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ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

Black birds in London (1 Viewer)

Maroon Jay

Airborne
Canada
Saw two different black birds in London. Can someone ID for me please.
 

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Sangahyando

Well-known member
Thank you very much. How do you tell so that I will know for next time to tell them from other black birds?
They're very similar to American Crows. By contrast, Rooks have a subtly different profile (and adult Rooks have a bare whitish face), and Jackdaws have a grey back of the neck, a shorter bill, and silvery irides.
 

Maroon Jay

Airborne
Canada
Thank you very much Richie. Although I have seen almost 1000 birds in many countries, it is my first time looking for birds in Europe. Very helpful information.
 
Thank you very much Richie. Although I have seen almost 1000 birds in many countries, it is my first time looking for birds in Europe. Very helpful information.

Wow almost 1000 - I think I'm nearly up to 100, but only been doing this over a year now so that's my excuse and I'm sticking to it ;)

I thought you may be a seasoned birder but those pages, though basic, are good for quick identification help - well, they help me ha ha
 

CARERY

Well-known member
Do possibly have another photo of bird 1. From this angle the bill looks a little too pointed for Carrion Crow IMO. It could be a juvenile Rook I'd say. They can look very similar.
 

Maroon Jay

Airborne
Canada
Wow almost 1000 - I think I'm nearly up to 100, but only been doing this over a year now so that's my excuse and I'm sticking to it ;)

I thought you may be a seasoned birder but those pages, though basic, are good for quick identification help - well, they help me ha ha

Yes, almost 1000 birds. 974 before coming to England. But I am new at birding in Europe and need some help. Hope to hit 1000 before I go home. Have found 9 so far in London. Have been spending most of my time taking in the typical tourist attractions so far.
 

pianoman

duck and diver, bobolink and weaver
Surprisingly difficult, because I think this bird is somewhat immature. But by the time imm. Rook has lost that much feathering from the top of the bill, it would be starting to display other adult characteristics like shaggier thighs and the start of a bare patch at the base of the bill. Therefore my guess is Carrion Crow.

We don't have that ID problem in Ireland, where the CC is replaced by Hooded Crow!
 

aeshna5

Well-known member
Do possibly have another photo of bird 1. From this angle the bill looks a little too pointed for Carrion Crow IMO. It could be a juvenile Rook I'd say. They can look very similar.

Very unlikely to be a Rook in London unless in more rural outskirts. If in a London park almost definitely a Carrion Crow!
 

Paul Longland

Well-known member
Good luck on reaching your millennium of birds I am sure you will pick up plenty here in UK. A word of caution though if birding in the royal parks of London..... many of the wildfowl will not be wild birds even though some are species that are indigenous.
 

Valéry Schollaert

Respect animals, don't eat or wear their body or s
Wow almost 1000 - I think I'm nearly up to 100, but only been doing this over a year now so that's my excuse and I'm sticking to it ;)

I thought you may be a seasoned birder but those pages, though basic, are good for quick identification help - well, they help me ha ha

You can visit a place like Kasese / Queen Elizabeth NP in Uganda... you can see nearly 200 species in one day B :)
 

Maroon Jay

Airborne
Canada
Good luck on reaching your millennium of birds I am sure you will pick up plenty here in UK. A word of caution though if birding in the royal parks of London..... many of the wildfowl will not be wild birds even though some are species that are indigenous.

Thank you. City parks around the world often have tame birds. Some are wild birds that have come to exist on human handouts and stay in the parks. Most of them are common and I have seen before such as Rock Dove, Mute Swan, Canada Goose, Greylag Goose, Starlings, several species of ducks and other common park birds.
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia
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