• BirdForum is the net's largest birding community dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE!

    Register for an account to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

Blackcap in my garden (1 Viewer)

Hi there, just this year and for the first time, I have a blackcap regularly visiting my garden. I have to admit that I had to Google for ID, so I know that it's a female (think I would have had a good guess at the male version! 😆). I'm now just wondering whether blackcaps are normally solitary? Also where's the male? All the other garden birds are getting very excited at the approach of spring, and I feel a bit sorry for this little lady. She's feeding on sunflower hearts from a feeder, and pyracantha berries. Thanks in advance!
 

foresttwitcher

Virtually unknown member
United Kingdom
Blackcaps are normally migratory, heading south for our winter. But recent milder winters have meant some over-winter, either our own birds or more likely those that bred further north last summer. This means that there are fewer around in the winter so are more likely to be solitary. So your bird may either move north in the spring or if she stays a male may pass through and set up a territory.

Welcome to the forum.
 

Deb Burhinus

Used to be well known! 😎
Europe
Britain’s Blackcaps are primarily migratory as FT says but ringing studies (of Black Forest Blackcaps) also show we have a significant winter influx of German Blackcaps into Britain. It is thought supplementary garden feeding has influenced an increase in our winter Blackcap numbers.
 

StephenHampshire

Well-known member
United Kingdom
Britain’s Blackcaps are primarily migratory as FT says but ringing studies (of Black Forest Blackcaps) also show we have a significant winter influx of German Blackcaps into Britain. It is thought supplementary garden feeding has influenced an increase in our winter Blackcap numbers.
I have a male and female visit my garden regularly, and assume they will move back up north in Spring, so probably not a pair, which ties in with the above two posts. The RSPB bird fact page for Blackcap lists breeding birds as arriving in April.
 

Pam_m

Well-known member
I have had Blackcaps visiting my garden since the last week in December. A male has been more regular with visits than a female. They fed on the Mahonia flowers initially whilst the flowers lasted. I spike apples on branches and they will perch for a long time pecking away at the fruit. Enjoy them while they are still around in your garden.
 
Blackcaps are normally migratory, heading south for our winter. But recent milder winters have meant some over-winter, either our own birds or more likely those that bred further north last summer. This means that there are fewer around in the winter so are more likely to be solitary. So your bird may either move north in the spring or if she stays a male may pass through and set up a territory.

Welcome to the forum.
Thank you so much for this informative reply. I'll keep an eye on her!
 
Thanks
Britain’s Blackcaps are primarily migratory as FT says but ringing studies (of Black Forest Blackcaps) also show we have a significant winter influx of German Blackcaps into Britain. It is thought supplementary garden feeding has influenced an increase in our winter Blackcap numbers.
for this reply. I've been feeding birds for many years but this little blackcap is my first one 😊
 
I have had Blackcaps visiting my garden since the last week in December. A male has been more regular with visits than a female. They fed on the Mahonia flowers initially whilst the flowers lasted. I spike apples on branches and they will perch for a long time pecking away at the fruit. Enjoy them while they are still around in your garden.
Thank you, I hope she'll become a regular, and maybe bring some companions next time. I shall try the apple trick. I often throw cores out in the garden but they generally just rot uneaten!
 
I have a male and female visit my garden regularly, and assume they will move back up north in Spring, so probably not a pair, which ties in with the above two posts. The RSPB bird fact page for Blackcap lists breeding birds as arriving in April.
Thanks for your reply, interesting. Why do you assume that your male and female are not a pair? 🤔
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top