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Bridge camera vs macro lens (1 Viewer)

canonman77

Well-known member
United Kingdom
Hi, I’ve been toying the idea of getting a bridge camera (Sony rx10 iv) or other for macro mainly or should I go for a macro lens (canon 100mm is)for my 7d. I’ve seen lovely pics with both, but am at a loss as to which would be better at macro photography. It might be a no brainier but please humour me!. 🙂

Cheers
Sean
 

Swissboy

Sempach, Switzerland
Supporter
Switzerland
Hi, I’ve been toying the idea of getting a bridge camera (Sony rx10 iv) or other for macro mainly or should I go for a macro lens (canon 100mm is)for my 7d. I’ve seen lovely pics with both, but am at a loss as to which would be better at macro photography. It might be a no brainier but please humour me!. 🙂

Cheers
Sean

One major problem with the Sony is that the best macro feature works only with the wide-angle setting. Thus, one needs to get really very close to benefit fully from this macro feature. A true macro lens allows much more flexibility, But, of course, at the price of having to lug around much heavier material, Sony, by the way, also has the same great macro feature built into its truly very compact RX100 camera.
 

canonman77

Well-known member
United Kingdom
Macro

Hi, thanks for your message, I’ll probably go for a macro lens. The canon lens looks a really good macro lens & portrait.

Cheers
Sean
 

Steve Babbs

Well-known member
I'd agree with Swissboy. The Sony is great for near macro: butterflies etc but I now carry a Olympus TG-6 with me for true macro stuff. Carrying both is considerably lighter than my old 7D and 150mm macro though.
 

iveljay

Well-known member
TG-4 + the led light guide, even illumination without the need for a ring flash. The other flash diffuser is not really designed for macro.

Also use the built in focus stacking feature.

I use an old OMD E-M1 with the Oly macro lens also with built in focus stacking. The only trouble with focus stacking is that nothing must move during the multiple exposures, so its not always available.

The seperate macro lens does give you more of a chance with things like nervous insects.

Really depends on what you are shooting and the distance involved as to what works best. On the TG it is labelled microscope mode for a reason.

For ad-hoc close ups I often use my old faithful Canon Ixus - 960 Titanium, a mere 12 years old and still in regular use! Obviously not as weather resistent as the others.
 
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