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Brown Bear encounter (1 Viewer)

fugl

Well-known member
Edit: I wish they'd disable the bloody predictive text element of this site!

Know what you mean, I’ve been stung more than once in the same way. What I do in such cases is to ask one of the mods to correct it for me.
 

opisska

Jan Ebr
Poland
I would be walking like that, but not because of clever care, but because of poop in my pants! Properly scary, Italy keeps surprising me with their wildlife.

I had a similarly close encouter in Armenia, but the bears turned around the moment they noticed us, so it was way less scary.
 

Steve

Surfing
Staff member
United Kingdom
Edit: I wish they'd disable the bloody predictive text element of this site!

There is no Predictive text element in the sites software, if it's anywhere its in your own Browser or you have it turned on on your phone or computer , I think you forked up and instead of asking to have Bare changed to Bear you decided as usual to take the negative approach and blame anyone else but yourself and in this case blamed the site.

As it happens I changed it for you, your welcome.
 

Arbu

Well-known member
Surely the father should have got into a position close to his son rather than walking back at a distance and videoing?
 

fugl

Well-known member
Surely the father should have got into a position close to his son rather than walking back at a distance and videoing?

Yeah, I would have thought so too if for no other reason than to provide a diversion if the bear got aggressive.
 

Farnboro John

Well-known member
Hard to tell of course but don't phones usually have quite a wide angle lens unless you deliberately zoom it? How easy is it to tell the perspective, especially with the phone held vertically? (I admit as a DSLR man this routine phone video practice both offends me and drives me crazy with essentially rubbish footage largely of sky instead of the breadth of the action!)

John
 

fugl

Well-known member
Hard to tell of course but don't phones usually have quite a wide angle lens unless you deliberately zoom it? How easy is it to tell the perspective, especially with the phone held vertically? . . .

Yeah, that’s a point. . .he may have been a lot closer than it looks.
 

Arbu

Well-known member
Well you can see a good few metres of ground between them. But actually I read that most bear attacks on humans are because the bears feel threatened, rather than out of predation, and very few attacks are on children, so from that point of view I suppose it does make sense for the father to be further back.
 

PCreed

Member
Well you can see a good few metres of ground between them. But actually I read that most bear attacks on humans are because the bears feel threatened, rather than out of predation, and very few attacks are on children, so from that point of view I suppose it does make sense for the father to be further back.

That's indeed the case. And many bears will do a "bluff charge" when they want to scare off a human without engaging in an actual physical altercation.

But none of that advice works with a polar bear. They're extremely intelligent and fatal encounters have often involved predation. They will actively hunt humans.

--Phil C.
 

Chosun Juan

Given to Fly
Australia - Aboriginal
Saw this on a news snippet. Pretty sure I would have wet my pants ! Give me a big cranky buck Kangaroo to tackle in preference any day !

I think that was one well fed bear - luckily.

Kudos to the boy - great job. Father too. I had the distinct feeling that every time the bear reared on hind legs that it was sussing the larger adult human form out.

Phew ! All's well that ends well. Grizzlies - you can have them !





Chosun :gh:
 

Farnboro John

Well-known member
That's indeed the case. And many bears will do a "bluff charge" when they want to scare off a human without engaging in an actual physical altercation.

But none of that advice works with a polar bear. They're extremely intelligent and fatal encounters have often involved predation. They will actively hunt humans.

--Phil C.

Indeed. One of the regular wildlife cameraman divers (it might have been Doug Allan) said he'd never had a Polar Bear look at him as if he was anything other than lunch.

John
 

Maroon Jay

Airborne
Canada
I don't know anything about European bears but I live in Alberta Canada where there are lots of bears, both Grizzly and Black Bears. I spend a lot of time hiking in the mountains and I meet them all the time. It is rare that they will bother anyone. Exceptions are if you get near their babies or their food or you take them by surprise in the tall plants. I have often encountered bears just a few metres from me. They look at me and go on their way. As mentioned above, this does not include Polar Bears which will hunt and eat you.
 

opisska

Jan Ebr
Poland
Polar bears are a special thing. On Svalbard, the whole situation,if you think about it, is out of this world: people there live in the territory of these large predators, which they however also want to protect. The relationship is basically: we know we are a box of chocolates for you, but could you please not eat us? Pretty please? It's the one animal nobody fucks with, ever. So impressive!

On a side note, ever thought about Orcas? They are fully capable to become a Polar bear squared of the seas (good look in self-defense against them) but they just voluntarily choose not to and are our friends instead.
 

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