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ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

Bucket List Birds (1 Viewer)

Welsh Peregrine

Well-known member
I am also after all the families. Top ten left include
Kagu
Kiwi
Trumpeter
Tody
Rail-babbler
Stitchbird
Kokako
Plains Wanderer
Secretarybird
Seriema

Of those others have mentioned , I have seen Cassowary, Capercaillie, Shoebill, Baikal Teal, Harpy Eagle, Bat Hawk, Pygmy Falcon, Peregrine, Ibisbill, Diademed Sandpiper Plover, Pallas’ Sandgrouse, Sunbittern, Sungrebe, Hoatzin, Cuckoo-roller, Tropicbird, Puffin, Ivory Gull, Cock of the Rock, Crowned Pigeon, KoS BoP, Gnatpitta, Spatuletail, Wallcreeper, Bristlehead, Painted Bunting and both Picathartes, and mighty fine they all are too, but no better than Great Grey Owl, lekking Ruff, Magellanic Plover, King Penguin, Helmeted Hornbill and many others....
 

lgonz1008

Well-known member
United States
I am also after all the families. Top ten left include
Kagu
Kiwi
Trumpeter
Tody
Rail-babbler
Stitchbird
Kokako
Plains Wanderer
Secretarybird
Seriema

Of those others have mentioned , I have seen Cassowary, Capercaillie, Shoebill, Baikal Teal, Harpy Eagle, Bat Hawk, Pygmy Falcon, Peregrine, Ibisbill, Diademed Sandpiper Plover, Pallas’ Sandgrouse, Sunbittern, Sungrebe, Hoatzin, Cuckoo-roller, Tropicbird, Puffin, Ivory Gull, Cock of the Rock, Crowned Pigeon, KoS BoP, Gnatpitta, Spatuletail, Wallcreeper, Bristlehead, Painted Bunting and both Picathartes, and mighty fine they all are too, but no better than Great Grey Owl, lekking Ruff, Magellanic Plover, King Penguin, Helmeted Hornbill and many others....
Sounds like you've gotten some amazing birds already on your life list, of the ones missing, I'm guessing Oceania offers the most new bird families. But it seems like Todies, Seriemas or Secretarybird might be the easiest families because they can be readily found if you go to the right countries (and most of those countries are already open).

For Todies, I'd say Dominican Republic is the best option since they have at least 2 more endemic bird families, but Puerto Rico and Cuba also have Todies have their own endemic families, so maybe you've already seen all those families or might need to make a sweep through the Caribbean endemics.
 

Welsh Peregrine

Well-known member
The countries may well be open, but not to UK citizens at present! Yes, I do need Cuba, Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico in due course (but did get a vagrant Spindalis in Florida).
 

lgonz1008

Well-known member
United States
The countries may well be open, but not to UK citizens at present! Yes, I do need Cuba, Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico in due course (but did get a vagrant Spindalis in Florida).
Forgot the UK is still closed off, hopefully they will realize soon enough that keeping things closed doesn't help much, but then again, some people are worried the US might go back to lockdown, so who can predict at this point.

That's one family down, but the Caribbean seems to get a new bird family every decade now, it's reaching the point that missing an endemic songbird might lead to missing a family down the line in those islands...
 

Mysticete

Well-known member
United States
I am also after all the families. Top ten left include
Kagu
Kiwi
Trumpeter
Tody
Rail-babbler
Stitchbird
Kokako
Plains Wanderer
Secretarybird
Seriema

Of those others have mentioned , I have seen Cassowary, Capercaillie, Shoebill, Baikal Teal, Harpy Eagle, Bat Hawk, Pygmy Falcon, Peregrine, Ibisbill, Diademed Sandpiper Plover, Pallas’ Sandgrouse, Sunbittern, Sungrebe, Hoatzin, Cuckoo-roller, Tropicbird, Puffin, Ivory Gull, Cock of the Rock, Crowned Pigeon, KoS BoP, Gnatpitta, Spatuletail, Wallcreeper, Bristlehead, Painted Bunting and both Picathartes, and mighty fine they all are too, but no better than Great Grey Owl, lekking Ruff, Magellanic Plover, King Penguin, Helmeted Hornbill and many others....
It's fun to see what "bucket List" birds have been knocked off by others here. I've seen Secretarybird, Kokako, and Stitchbird, but most of the already seen birds here would be lifers for me.
 

qwerty5

Well-known member
United States
Good favorite bird family for sure, as for your targets, I'd say that a trip to South Texas or Florida during spring migration might give you all of the birds in your list except Kirtland's Warbler, Henslow's Sparrow and Bicknell's Thrush (these might only have a good chance in their breeding grounds or their wintering grounds if you're willing to leave the US for the Warbler and the Thrush).
All of the warblers (except Swainson's), Summer Tanager, Henslow's Sparrow, and Peregrine Falcon are technically possible where I live, but are uncommon or rare. I would love to go on a dedicated birding trip sometime, but it's not possible now, maybe in a few years. South Florida would definitely be near the top of the list of places to go.
 

Mysticete

Well-known member
United States
All of the warblers (except Swainson's), Summer Tanager, Henslow's Sparrow, and Peregrine Falcon are technically possible where I live, but are uncommon or rare. I would love to go on a dedicated birding trip sometime, but it's not possible now, maybe in a few years. South Florida would definitely be near the top of the list of places to go.
Do you use ebird? If so, the needs alert can be an effective way of finding new spots and less common local species. I've managed to get several good birds locally through that method
 

qwerty5

Well-known member
United States
Parulidae is my favorite group to, and honestly spring migration is my favorite time of year birding wise, just because it's so great to see all the warblers come through. The Fox Valley of Wisconsin also has some pretty great spring birding spots to.

I think Kirtland's Warbler was amongst the first 10 warbler species I ever saw, but that bird is easy when you grow up 2 hours from there core breeding range. Hopefully when things return to normal I can make another pilgrimage to see them.

Warbler-wise, Kentucky and Worm-eating are my biggest misses. They both breeding in Wisconsin (well Worm-eating is super rare and protected), and I tried my best, but dipped on both this spring. Still need Swainson's as well, but then I don't think I have actually spent time anywhere where they occur.
Spring migration is my favorite time as well, it's when the birds are at their peak color and are much more concentrated than in the fall.

I've seen only 22 species of warblers, so I'm not near complete yet. I need fifteen more species to finish all the eastern warblers. All can be found in my area, except Swainson's. I just picked up five species (Chestnut-sided, Black-throated Blue, Canada, Ovenbird, and Worm-eating) on vacation in WV. What is most satisfying to me is that in 2021 I've seen 20 of my 22 total warbler species (Tennessee and Louisiana Waterthrush are t

Where my life list really lacks is in the birds attached to water (waterbirds, shorebirds, gulls, etc.). I currently have seen only the most common species. For example, I have 7 waterbirds, 3 shorebirds, 3 gulls, and 3 herons on my life list. But I have 90 songbird species. I am planning to put more effort into finding waterbirds and shorebirds, so my list should soon grow.
Do you use ebird? If so, the needs alert can be an effective way of finding new spots and less common local species. I've managed to get several good birds locally through that method
No, I haven't started eBird yet. I've really just gotten started seriously birding in the last couple years. I've been birding more casually since 2014, but over the last couple years I've really gotten obsessed with birding and identification.
 

Patudo

Well-known member
My top 10, but most will forever be unattainable because I can't justify flying so far (Greta would be pleased), are probably, in no particular order:

- Orange-breasted falcon - I would really, really like to see this highly specialized tropical falcon

- Siberian white crane - rare, beautiful, charismatic, emblematic of the struggle that birds face to survive under the pressure of ever-encroaching humanity.

- Gyrfalcon (grey or white) - dream bird of my childhood, and not totally out of reach given that Iceland isn't a continent away from the UK

- Monal - stunningly beautiful bird living in some of the most picturesque locations in the world

- Van Hasselt's or really any spectacular sunbird or hummingbird

- White-throated or any large needletail

- Whooping crane or red-crowned/Japanese/Manchurian crane

- Eleonora's falcon (in action, hunting migrants)

- any large forest eagle (crowned, harpy, Philippine)

- Verreaux's eagle (hopefully in flight, in huge mountain updrafts)


I don't really expect to ever see any more than two or three of these, but, as you said, a list of wishes...
 

lgonz1008

Well-known member
United States
My top 10, but most will forever be unattainable because I can't justify flying so far (Greta would be pleased), are probably, in no particular order:

- Orange-breasted falcon - I would really, really like to see this highly specialized tropical falcon

- Siberian white crane - rare, beautiful, charismatic, emblematic of the struggle that birds face to survive under the pressure of ever-encroaching humanity.

- Gyrfalcon (grey or white) - dream bird of my childhood, and not totally out of reach given that Iceland isn't a continent away from the UK

- Monal - stunningly beautiful bird living in some of the most picturesque locations in the world

- Van Hasselt's or really any spectacular sunbird or hummingbird

- White-throated or any large needletail

- Whooping crane or red-crowned/Japanese/Manchurian crane

- Eleonora's falcon (in action, hunting migrants)

- any large forest eagle (crowned, harpy, Philippine)

- Verreaux's eagle (hopefully in flight, in huge mountain updrafts)


I don't really expect to ever see any more than two or three of these, but, as you said, a list of wishes...
A list of wishes indeed, though most of them can't be seen, a decent planned trip could probably net you some of the big targets you have, a winter trip to the Darien in Panama will give you Harpy Eagle, Crested Eagle, and a few beautiful hummingbirds, if you make a layover stop around Texas for a day or two, Whooping Crane can be pretty easy to get too. Alternatives could be a trip to Guyana (which is a bit more expensive) but you are guaranteed Orange-breasted Falcon and Harpy Eagle there or a trip to Ecuador, if you plan it to match with a confirmed Harpy nest, you can get your big target alongside dozens of beautiful and sought-after hummingbirds without spending as much as you would in other locations.

Just throwing ideas, like you said it's a wish list, but everyone wants to get their wishes fulfilled once or twice, especially for a big raptor and crane lover which you seem to be.
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

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