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Budgie in Central Park (1 Viewer)

jasperpatch

Amy, Brit in Quebec.
I'm assuming it was a released pet, but i stumbled on a lovely blue budgie in the park yesterday and was interested to know if it is a 'regular' in the park. Looked very healthy, was observing the juvenile robins eating berries. Hopefully it has the sense to migrate!
Have photos, but on holiday so they'll have to wait.
 

KC Foggin

Super Moderator
Staff member
Opus Editor
Supporter
United States
Our member, Pinewood, would be the best person to ask as he is a daily visitor to Central Park. ;)
 

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Hello Jasperpatch,

Yes, it is probably an escape, but I doubt that it can migrate back to Australia.

On the other hand, in New York, we do have colonies of monk parrots, those were started by escapes from JFK airport. Where there are overhead electric cables, the monk parrots built their colonies around transformers, so they have central heating.

Happy bird watching,
Arthur Pinewood :hi:
 

jasperpatch

Amy, Brit in Quebec.
Hello Jasperpatch,

Yes, it is probably an escape, but I doubt that it can migrate back to Australia.

Arthur Pinewood :hi:

:) I was thinking south to warmer States rather than that far, but I see your point!

Ah, sounds like the Monk are a similar phenomenon to the Ring-necked Parakeets back in London in the UK. Clever adaptation to deal with the cold. Thanks for the info and happy birding to you too.
 

rdcny

Well-known member
A Parakeet in a City Park (1919).

Nothing could be more pleasing to the eye than the sight of the distinguished officers of the Allies in their handsome uniforms as they go about the streets of our city. The drab-clad civilian notes them from the corner of an envious eye, and the small boys gaze with frank and unqualified admiration.

I noticed much the same effect among the birds in Central Park one afternoon in October. I was coming along the path around the Reservoir above 85th Street when my eye was caught by a large flock of dingy English Sparrows that were feeding in the grass by the bridle-path. As my eye roved from the outskirts of the flock toward its center I became aware of some cause of commotion and special interest. The birds were craning their necks, chirping loudly, and jostling one another in their effort to stand all in the same place. In another moment I had discovered the cause. Shining with the brightness of a patch of sunlight on the green grass, and politely oblivious of the vulgar peering crowd about him, sat a little Parakeet busily engaged in feeding on the grass seeds. He showed little fear as I approached, and finally flew to a small tree a few paces away, from which he watched a moment or two and then returned to the grass. The distinguished stranger was about the size of a White-throated Sparrow in body, but of course his tail was much longer. On his forehead he bore a clear yellow mark. His head, throat, breast, underparts, and rump were bright bluish green. His upperparts were distinctly yellowish green, while the wing coverts were blackish, each feather being delicately fringed with pale yellow or whitish. The tail feathers, as the bird spread them in alighting, showed a fringe at the outer ends of yellowish green and whitish.

Such a sight always fills the observer with strange I thoughts of other lands and times. Perhaps some will be reminded of the day when Carolina Paroquets were casual visitors even in New York State. I suppose the little Parakeet was an escaped cage-bird, or, possibly, one that is allowed to fly at large to return at night to his cage. Anyway, I have not seen him since, and often wonder what became of him. But nothing can blot out the picture of the graceful, brilliant stranger so superior to the vulgar curiosity of the dingy Sparrows. - Tertius Van Dyke, New York City.
 

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Hello RDCNY,

Note that in 1919 house sparrows were still called "English sparrows," as they were imported only decades, earlier. The 1912 edition of Birrds of New York by Eaton uses both terms. By then the house sparrow was truly despised by farmers, bird watcher and ornithologists.

Happy bird watching,
Arthur :hi:
 

rdcny

Well-known member
VAN DYKE, Tertius

Date of Birth: January 18, 1886 NYC. Parents: (request lineage). Education: Tertius Van Dyke attended Lawrenceville School and was graduated at Princeton University in the class of 1908. He then studied at Magdalen College, Oxford University, England, where he earned a B.A. degree in 1910, an M.A. degree in 1917. He also holds a B.D. degree from Union Theological Seminary since 1913. Profession: Mr. van Dyke is now Headmaster of the Gunnery School at Washington, Connecticut. He has held pastorates in New York City and Washington, Conn. and during World War I worked with his father in Europe and also in Washington, D.C. Clubs and Organizations: Century Association; Princeton Club of New York; University Club. Marital Status: He married Mary Elizabeth Cannon of New Haven, Connecticut in 1924. Children: There are three children: Dorothea Atherton van Dyke; Henry van Dyke and Paul Cannon van Dyke.

He died in 1958...
 

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