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Buteo in east Tennessee (1 Viewer)

don45_tn

Member
Request help identifying hawk that was photographed near Knoxville, Tennessee, USA on November 21, 2020.
 

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birdmeister

Well-known member
United States
I believe this is an immature Red-shouldered Hawk. First of all, date heavily favors Red-shouldered over Broad-winged.

Photo 1 shows the pale crescents in the primaries of Red-shouldered. Broad-winged should show much more squared panels. Also, some reddish-brown markings are present in the patagial area (and underneath about half of the leading edge of the wing), rarely seen in Broadwings.

Photo 2 shows two neat rows of white checker marks in the secondaries, a Red-shoulder ID point. Also, the pattern of several faint brown bands of equal length in the tail points to Red-shouldered.
 

Deb Burhinus

Used to be well known! 😎
Europe
Yeah, I won’t argue with that -posted very hastily without even looking at the second image (which shows a breast pattern like a juvenile ReSHa) (very blurry eyed at the moment too after hours of negotiating the idiosyncracies of the new site)

Broad-winged Hawk are seen on migration well into late November btw so it’s definitely not too late for them to be going through https://ebird.org/science/status-and-trends/brwhaw/range-map
 

Microtus

Maryland USA (he/his)
Supporter
United States
Young Red-shouldered Hawk. Broad-winged Hawks are pretty much gone from Tennessee before mid-November.
 

birdmeister

Well-known member
United States
Yeah, I won’t argue with that -posted very hastily without even looking at the second image (which shows a breast pattern like a juvenile ReSHa) (very blurry eyed at the moment too after hours of negotiating the idiosyncracies of the new site)

Broad-winged Hawk are seen on migration well into late November btw so it’s definitely not too late for them to be going through https://ebird.org/science/status-and-trends/brwhaw/range-map
This is true on the coast, Deb, where Broadwings regularly linger from Cape May south into November.

As Microtus said, they're much rarer inland, with only one confirmed November eBird record in Tennessee in the past 10 years. Even on the coast, they rarely linger at places like Cape May (NJ), Virginia, etc. past November 15.

I'm really not sure why the eBird graphic you linked shows that! It's quite misleading.
 

Deb Burhinus

Used to be well known! 😎
Europe
This is true on the coast, Deb, where Broadwings regularly linger from Cape May south into November.

As Microtus said, they're much rarer inland, with only one confirmed November eBird record in Tennessee in the past 10 years. Even on the coast, they rarely linger at places like Cape May (NJ), Virginia, etc. past November 15.

I'm really not sure why the eBird graphic you linked shows that! It's quite misleading.
Thanks BB as I said, I posted very quickly without even looking at the second image and didn’t check ebird records for autumn sightings in Tennessee etc so thanks for doing so. I‘ve seen Broad-winged hawk in the beginning of the first week of November in MI before but admittedly that would have been a straggler albeit much further North than Tenn.
 

Jeff Hopkins

Just another...observer
United States
Another vote for Red-shoulder, for the reasons already given.

To add to what birdmeister said, we haven't had a Broad-wing at our hawk watch here in eastern PA since Oct. 23rd. And still lots of Shoulders going through this month. And I haven't checked, but I suspect that's true at the hawk watch birdmeister counts at, too.
 

Birdbrain22

Well-known member
Agree with Red-shouldered Hawk here. Yeah and Broad-wingeds are usually the first ones through here... most by mid Oct.
 
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Deb Burhinus

Used to be well known! 😎
Europe
Yeah, I won’t argue with that -posted very hastily without even looking at the second image (which shows a breast pattern like a juvenile ReSHa) (very blurry eyed at the moment too after hours of negotiating the idiosyncracies of the new site)
I agree it’s a Red-shouldered Hawk for the reasons (among others) I gave in post #5!!
 

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