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Caatinga Antwren (1 Viewer)

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Whitney, B. M., G. A. Bravo, R. Belmonte-Lopes, M. R. Bornschein, M. R. Pie, and R. T. Brumfield. In review. Phylogenetic relationships of the enigmatic Herpsilochmus sellowi (Aves, Thamnophilidae) with description of a new genus from eastern South America.
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
G. A. Bravo, B. M. Whitney, R. Belmonte-Lopes, M. R. Bornschein, N. Aristizábal, R. Beco, J. Battilana, L. N. Naka, A. Aleixo, M. R. Pie, L. F. Silveira., E. P. Derryberry, R. T. Brumfield. A species-level phylogenetic hypothesis of Herpsilochmus antwrens (Aves, Thamnophilidae) with an assessment of their generic relationships using phylogenomic data. In review at Ornithology.

Is it the same work ?

However, the name of this journal "Ornithology" means nothing to me
 
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Jacana

Will Jones
Hungary
Might contain some of the same data, but it sounds like quite a different final publication. My guess is that the original one has been subsumed into a larger manuscript.

Ornithology is a well known journal
 

Jacana

Will Jones
Hungary
The changes for The Auk and The Condor have both been quite controversial. People who published there liked the old names but the people who run them thought that the names hold the journals back.
 

Nutcracker

Stop Brexit!
... but the people who run them thought that the names hold the journals back.
Perhaps because name searches would bring up lots of hits about the birds ahead of the journal title? I know that happens with searches for the BOU's journal Ibis.
 

Kratter

Well-known member
One of the main reasons for the journal title changes was that journals named after birds put ornithologists at a decided disadvantage when they were compared against academics from other "-ologies" that have standard journal titles. Let's say there is a search for a new faculty member at a smaller university. The search committee has members from several departments, and these members will not know that the Auk is different than the Chat (journal of Carolina Bird Club) or the Crane (newsletter of the Alachua Audubon Society) , whereas the Journal of Mammalogy will stand out.

Andy
 

Jacana

Will Jones
Hungary
Perhaps because name searches would bring up lots of hits about the birds ahead of the journal title? I know that happens with searches for the BOU's journal Ibis.

I doubt it. I dont think it is very common to search for references by journal title these days, unless you happen to know the paper you're looking for. Certainly, when I'm writing manuscripts and looking for references, I type in keywords into search engines like Google Scholar. The journal the paper is published in is something of an afterthought.

Andy has the correct explanation
 

Björn Bergenholtz

... earlier a k a "Calalp"
Sigh, so that's it, next year the (Good Old) Auk (1884–2020) becomes Ornithology, and the (ditto) Condor (1899–2020) turns into Ornithological Applications ... those Editors, their advisers, and consultants, sure came up with some imaginative names, full of inspiration. What fun they must have had, twisting their brains in such imaginative ways ...

Somewhat sad, I was kind of fond of the older truly Classic titles, as well as all the other well-known Bird Journals (in the same proud tradition), like; Emu, Ibis, Aquila, Alauda, Ardea, Cotinga, Hirundo, Scopus, Elepaio, and onwards ... as well as even lesser known ones, like; Sterna, Milvus and Bläcku.

Well, well, things are what they are. We'll get used to it.
 

l_raty

laurent raty
In this age of pseudo-scientific predatory electronic journals, I'd think it wholly unsound to presume that the presence of an -ology word in a title is a guarantee of any value...
RIP, Auk and Condor.
 

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