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Cabela's Guide Series 8x32 Revisted (1 Viewer)

brocknroller

A professed porromaniac
United States
First, let me link to Jerry’s original thread on these binoculars to catch up anyone who missed it. It’s too old for me to reply to, so I had to start another thread to continue the story.

https://www.birdforum.net/showthread.php?t=332112

Jerry generously sent me the Cabela 8x32 Guide a few years ago, and it’s been my go-to birding bin ever since. I didn’t know the price until I recently read his thread on BF, but for $199 (or better yet $149 discounted price), it is certainly worthy of mention on Frank’s never-ending Bargain Bin thread. It’s sharp, bright, color neutral, and it has a wide FOV and wide sweet spot. Overall, it gives one of the best views I’ve seen through non-alpha roof-prism binoculars. I also like the ergonomics, which is not something I can say about most roof binoculars I’ve tried. This is due to the narrow, high bridge, which gives me plenty of barrel to wrap my fingers around, and the shallow thumb indents for support underneath.

The main reason I sold my Nikon 8x32 LX was that I couldn’t hold it steady or comfortably. It was heavy for its size, and with no barrels to wrap my fingers around or thumb indents, I felt like I was holding a brick. The other issue was the fast focuser (though it wasn’t as fast as the Terra ED, which wins the Quick Draw McGraw Prize). For me, the Guide’s focuser speed is like Baby Bear’s porridge--just right. The focuser recently developed a squeak, which could probably be remedied with lube, but since the focuser is internal, that’s not something I can do myself.

Someone on the original thread mentioned about the eyecups feeling “plasticy.” They don’t feel that way to me. The eyecup frames, which might be metal, are covered in rubber. They remind me of the Nikon 8x32 LX’s twist-up eyecups in diameter and thickness, and like the LX, they have one intermediate stop.

Even though I remain a diehard porro fan, when it comes to 8x birding bins, I have come to appreciate the advantages of roofs. You can focus closer without barrel shadow overlap and without having to adjust the IPD. Even though I don’t go birding in the rain (or singing in the rain, though I sometimes sing in the shower), it’s convenient to have a sealed bin in the winter, so you can just walk right inside without fear of fogging (or fear of flogging if it's someone else’s porro). For using my porros in the winter, I would let them acclimate slowly to house temperature by putting them in the basement for an hour before taking them upstairs.

It’s also comforting to know I can use them with impunity when it “rains” pollen in the spring because the sticky yellow goo is not going to be drawn inside the binoculars by external focuser tubes. I once got a cat hair in one of my porros, which stuck to the bottom of the EP on some lube. I had to screw off the EP and remove the hair, which would never be a concern with the Guide.

Last month, I saw an 8x32 Cabela’s Guide in “excellent condition” for sale on eBay for $199, so I bought as a backup for when I send my original sample in for servicing. I don’t know if it’s sample variation or my imagination, but the view through the second sample appears even more “crisp” (as the Brits say) than the original.

I saw a 10x42 Cabela’s Guide for sale recently but passed on it based on the comment on the original thread that it was not the standout in its configuration as the 8x32 was. But I wanted a 10x bin for extra “social distancing,” so I bought a 10x35 E2 (black body version) on eBay for a good price (not as good after eBay added $50 shipping from Japan and PA sales tax), but still lower than others listed because it was used but in near mint condition, according to the seller. I'll find out next week. The price of E2s has gone up about $200 since I bought my first BB 10x35 E2.

Thanks to Jerry for the 8x32 Cabela’s Guide and for showing me that the “best bang for your buck” is no longer limited to porros.
 
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brocknroller

A professed porromaniac
United States
Thank you! Lee, Rich and Peter. And thanks for the link to the thread on Cabela's warranties and repairs (or lack thereof). I wasn't expecting the focuser lube to be covered under warranty since I'm not the original owner and they don't have transferable warranties like Vortex, but I didn't realize that they didn't do repairs. I'll email Cory Suddarth about the issue and find out what he charges. I got these for free, and really like them, so spending some money on repairs would be worth it as long as it didn't cost more than the original price of the binoculars.

I think Cabela's response to eitanaltman's inquiry about repairs was odd. "I am sorry to inform you that these being 5 years old, they would be considered to of had their life time." Besides the bad grammar and spelling, to say that the Cabela's Euros, which are relabeled Meoptas, have had their lifetime in just 5 years as if they were a cheap, Chinese-made laptop computer (which is expected to last 5 years) doesn't speak well for the company.

OTOH, if the rep had told the owner he had voided his warranty by attempting to fix the binoculars himself and had damaged them--that might be legitimate since that's often a caveat of warranty conditions, but that was not his response.

Anyway, there are a couple other features I like about the Cabela's Guide I failed to mention. Although they don't have ED glass, they show very little chromatic aberration. I tested them by looking at crows flying overhead and saw no CA in the center and only a moderate amount near the edge. I also looked at a robin perched on the power line in shadow against the sky at twilight and couldn't see any CA on axis. The only time I saw CA was when looking at crows flying against gray clouds, and even then, there was a minimal amount of purple fringing around the birds. At this price point, that's darn good CA control.

The flare control is also fairly good. I see a bit of flickering veiling glare at the bottom of the view as I tilt the bins from the ground to the top of trees (but during the day the sun is high since it's summer), but even as the sun goes down, I see only a single glare spot at the edge of the view at certain angles, which can be blocked with the rubber shades I used on my 8x32 SE, but I rarely need to use them.

The other thing I noticed is that for an 8x32 roof, they give a rather easy view, more like I would expect from an 8x42--certainly an easier view than I experienced with the 8x32 LX.

All and all, I'm very pleased and feel no need to buy more expensive 8x32 binoculars for birding (unless there's another round of stimulus funds :).
 
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dries1

Member
Brock,

I really enjoyed your posts over the years, always with some great laughs (needed more today than ever) reading the old posts - great writers to that to readers, it is great to have you back.

Andy W,
 

elkcub

Silicon Valley, California
United States
I've been wondering where you went, Brock, but wherever it was I'm happy that you're back. :t:

Ed

PS. Is THIS the model you're referring to? If so, what are that basic specs, most importantly eye relief?
 
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adhoc

Well-known member
Well, hello there Brock! I missed and look forward to your accounts of your rambles and the sites you visit for your birdwatching. They added charm and calm to this forum (while reminding us what binoculars are for!)
 
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Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Hello Brock,

Welcome back, indeed.

It is good to know that there is a moderately priced roof which might tickle people's fancy.

Stay safe,
Arthur
 

ceasar

Well-known member
Hi Brock,

Welcome back!

I managed to pick up a Cabela's 8x30 Porro Prism on May 30, 2012 for $49.99. Its box says it was made in Japan so I guess I am set for the millenium.

Bob
 

adhoc

Well-known member
Hi Brock,

Welcome back!
As you might know, Cabela's Guide is very similar to Leupold Mojave (and possibly to other clones as well) and before you buy more Cabela's binos you better have a look at the posts in this thread:
https://www.birdforum.net/showthread.php?t=390851

Peter

Celestron have just added an 8x32 and 10x32 to their new widely praised TrailSeeker-ED series (which had only 8x42 and 10x42). Each of the four models is between USD 280 and 300 at US online retailers.
 
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Tero

Retired
United States
Haven't bought any binoculars for several years. I've had the same Nikon 8x42 for years. The rubber outer layer started failing so they sent me a new pair. I have one 8x32, the old Pentax, but I hardly use them, as they are as heavy as a 8x42. I lend them out to guest birders.

Since I wear glasses at all times, most of the compact models don't work very well due to eye relief. My only store in town with anything sold me a Scheels 8x42 for 99 dollars a few Christmases back. They are quite good with optics, but a bit cheaply made.

Local birders buy the 8x42s at the bird store, or drive to Cabela's in Omaha.

I am still in the market for something, to carry on a bike when birding ends up accidental. The lightest 8x32 or a really good 8x25, not the Nikon bottom of the line model. But when I look at the specs for the 8x32s, and the eye relief is 15mm, I lose interest.
 
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lmans66

Out Birding....
Supporter
United States
Haven't bought any binoculars for several years. I've had the same Nikon 8x42 for years. The rubber outer layer started failing so they sent me a new pair. I have one 8x32, the old Pentax, but I hardly use them, as they are as heavy as a 8x42. I lend them out to guest birders.

Since I wear glasses at all times, most of the compact models don't work very well due to eye relief. My only store in town with anything sold me a Scheels 8x42 for 99 dollars a few Christmases back. They are quite good with optics, but a bit cheaply made.

Local birders buy the 8x42s at the bird store, or drive to Cabela's in Omaha.

I am still in the market for something, to carry on a bike when birding ends up accidental. The lightest 8x32 or a really good 8x25, not the Nikon bottom of the line model. But when I look at the specs for the 8x32s, and the eye relief is 15mm, I lose interest.

Try the Opticron 8x32...19mm eye relief. A nice pair....order thru B and H and you have them in a few days. $399..... Small, 15.9 ounces...a perfect size for what you want, jim
 

Tero

Retired
United States
Try the Opticron 8x32...19mm eye relief. A nice pair....order thru B and H and you have them in a few days. $399..... Small, 15.9 ounces...a perfect size for what you want, jim
Sounds good. Will have to wait for my next 1200 relief check.
 

lmans66

Out Birding....
Supporter
United States
Sounds good. Will have to wait for my next 1200 relief check.

Forget to mention...the 8x32 Traveler series.... I know Opticron has others below that but I have never tried. But the Traveler is one nice pair for the money. In my mind it beats the Maven, GPO, Frontier, Terra etc..all in that price point. I have never seen the Monarch 7 so can't refer to but quality wise, I can see where the Traveler beats the ones I have listed.
 

NDhunter

Experienced observer
United States
Brock is Back....

Brock:

Thanks for posting, I suppose it took me and some others prodding to get you
back.

When I think about the Cabela's 8x32, I do find it very good, and one would
not need to go any further when looking for a quality binocular.

This model does it all. When these were on clearance, I stocked up, and I like to share, my brother also got one. :t:

Jerry
 

Chosun Juan

Given to Fly
Australia - Aboriginal
I saw that you'd mosied on back into these here parts Brock .... howdy par-te-ner !
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=c5bP5NEhArc
The place hasn't changed at all (much ! :-O :) - you'll fit right in:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=PIs41AWdvDs

Good to see the evolution from diehard Porrosaurus - it worked out pretty well for the Marsupials (well until they ran foul of the invading Colonialists and the feral hordes). We won't expect you to go to the all-weather extremes of the monotremes - and let you transport your new 'babies' in a pouch ..... but you know, baby steps ;)







Chosun :gh:
 

DocSarvis

Well-known member
United States
BROCK! Holy Moly! I guess the kryptonite finally wore off. Welcome back....if it really is you. Sounds like you. Your unique perspective was missed. By me anyway. Stick around!
 

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