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Can’t identify this bird (1 Viewer)

Ndarcyfox

New member
Australia
Hi I was hoping someone might be able to help me identify this bird? Found in Murrumbeena in Victoria, Aus.
 

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Patrycja

Member
Poland
Hi. Psittacula krameri. As far as I know these birds do not live there, so it must be an escapee. Try to catch the bird, if it is possible.
 
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THE_FERN

Well-known member
Hi. Psittacula krameri. As far as I know these birds do not live there, so it must be an escapee. Try to catch the bird, if it is possible.
Yes it does look like ring-necked parakeet which (under the old taxonomy) is native to Africa and Asia. It was recently split into 2 species so that these 2 groups are distinct. I'm not sure which this is without further work. Either way not a true blue occa aussie.
 

KC Foggin

Super Moderator
Staff member
Opus Editor
Supporter
United States
Hi there and a warm welcome to you from those of us on staff here at BirdForum (y)

We're glad you found us and thanks for taking a moment to say hello. Please join in wherever you like ;)
 

delia todd

If I said the wrong thing it was a Senior Moment
Staff member
Opus Editor
Supporter
Scotland
Hi Ndarcyfox and a warm welcome from me too.

I'm sure you will enjoy it here and I hope to hear about all the birds you see when out and about.
 

Kits

Picture Picker
Welcome to Birdforum! I am sure that you will find lots to interest you here and I hope that you enjoy your visits.
 

omnitec

New member
United States
Hi

Since we're doing the "please identify" thing... The bird in the attachment is driving me nuts.

These two quite large birds showed up today on my midtown Atlanta balcony and hung out for about half an hour.

I've never seen one of these before, and can't find them on any "common birds of Georgia" list.

"Large" meaning "even big vs. most ravens or owls". Not large like a condor or anything like that, but... Maybe... a three foot wingspan at minimum? Hard to tell with the wings tucked down, but "large" anyway. LOL. All jet black, except the face, which looked dark grey in the rain.

Anybody who can throw an ID my way, it'd certainly help me sleep better tonight. :)

Josh
 

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Tired

Well-known member
United States
Those would be black vultures, yes. They aren't aggressive at all, they aren't dangerous. Vultures are known to projectile vomit when attacked while feeding, but unless you plan to run threateningly up to some black vultures while they're eating, that's not really a worry. They have to be fairly provoked to do that, too. I've seen people walk right by them, within ~5 feet, without getting any reaction beyond the vultures backing up a little. Yours may have stopped for a rest, or may have been eyeing something tempting on the ground below.

I like them. Some people find vultures ugly, but they're invaluable scavengers. Their stomachs are acidic enough to kill just about any pathogens they ingest, to the point where their droppings are sterile. This helps prevent the spread of disease, once a sick animal dies. If something is killed on a road near my house, I always make sure to (safely) move whatever it is off the road. Vultures can't take off terribly fast, so are vulnerable to being hit by cars if they try to scavenge something on the road. Not only is this typically fatal for the bird, it can be dangerous to the driver as well- a vulture's wingspan is more than enough to cover a windshield and prevent the driver seeing anything.
 

Deb Burhinus

Used to be well known! 😎
Europe
Good post ‘Tired’ - informative and quells any concerns that people might have when being in such proximity. (I think the OP was quite impressed though!).

PS I think I would ‘projectile vomit’ if somebody attacked me when eating 😁

PPS Welcome to Birdforum NDarcyfox - it’s your thread and somehow you ended up sharing! 😏
 

jmepler

It's just a flesh wound.
United States
Those would be black vultures, yes. They aren't aggressive at all, they aren't dangerous. Vultures are known to projectile vomit when attacked while feeding, but unless you plan to run threateningly up to some black vultures while they're eating, that's not really a worry. They have to be fairly provoked to do that, too. I've seen people walk right by them, within ~5 feet, without getting any reaction beyond the vultures backing up a little. Yours may have stopped for a rest, or may have been eyeing something tempting on the ground below.

I like them. Some people find vultures ugly, but they're invaluable scavengers. Their stomachs are acidic enough to kill just about any pathogens they ingest, to the point where their droppings are sterile. This helps prevent the spread of disease, once a sick animal dies. If something is killed on a road near my house, I always make sure to (safely) move whatever it is off the road. Vultures can't take off terribly fast, so are vulnerable to being hit by cars if they try to scavenge something on the road. Not only is this typically fatal for the bird, it can be dangerous to the driver as well- a vulture's wingspan is more than enough to cover a windshield and prevent the driver seeing anything.

Black Vultures in some areas have developed a taste for rubber, windshield wiper blades in particular. They have also done serious damage to rubber roofing. It does seem to be a local phenomenon. There is a population of Black Vultures near me of several hundred birds. There have never had any problems with them that I am aware of.
 

THE_FERN

Well-known member
Dunno. My first question would be "what does tif think?" (I've not checked). I guess my view is if we accept echo parakeet is a species, we should accept this...
 
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