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can this be possible (1 Viewer)

marty31

Member
first of all I live in northern England! the other day when eating our lunch at work, actually In a farm yard, my work pall, knowing I know a thing or two about uk birds asked me what that funny bird was over by a farm shed? the bird was feeding on the ground on either spilled seeds or more likely insects! I got out the van and walked over a bit closer, and although quite tame it eventually flew away, only to return 10 minutes later, IMO it could only be one bird! a hoopoe??? it couldn't be anything else! could it be a hoopoe? in northern England, in early November?
 

Larry Sweetland

Formerly 'Larry Wheatland'
first of all I live in northern England! the other day when eating our lunch at work, actually In a farm yard, my work pall, knowing I know a thing or two about uk birds asked me what that funny bird was over by a farm shed? the bird was feeding on the ground on either spilled seeds or more likely insects! I got out the van and walked over a bit closer, and although quite tame it eventually flew away, only to return 10 minutes later, IMO it could only be one bird! a hoopoe??? it couldn't be anything else! could it be a hoopoe? in northern England, in early November?

Not impossible. What features did you note at the time that made you think it was a Hoopoe?
 

Mono

Hi!
Staff member
Supporter
Europe
Indeed it is. There has been a vagrant hoopoe around Northumberland this autumn. It even got a mention on Autumnwatch.
 

marty31

Member
colour, size, crest, everything about it really! the only doubt in my mind was that, in my book it should not be here! when I told my non birding mate (who first noticed it) because he was facing it and had been watching it, to google hoopoe! he immediately remarked that's definitely that bird!
 

Larry Sweetland

Formerly 'Larry Wheatland'
Your bird may well be in the same area tomorrow if it's found somwhere to feed. Might be worth you or someone going back there with a camera, if you fancy it :t: The only likely bird that could be said to be of similar size and colour with a crest is Jay, so provided you eliminated that as a possibility (you haven't described why it wasn't a Jay yet) then it sounds good.
 
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harr1y

Well-known member
and although quite tame it eventually flew away?

Surely that would rule out Jay .. the minute i get within 10 miles of one of the buggers they are off whereas i.ve been able to get relatively close to Hoopoe ..that and the fact that it had a crest ... Look out for the black and white wings if you see it again and in flight ... they are very distinctive
 

_pauls

Well-known member
Indeed it is. There has been a vagrant hoopoe around Northumberland this autumn. It even got a mention on Autumnwatch.

There was a hoopoe in Lynemouth two weeks ago - that's only around 15 miles away from Alnwick as the hoopoe flies.
 

Larry Sweetland

Formerly 'Larry Wheatland'
Surely that would rule out Jay .. the minute i get within 10 miles of one of the buggers they are off whereas i.ve been able to get relatively close to Hoopoe ..that and the fact that it had a crest ... Look out for the black and white wings if you see it again and in flight ... they are very distinctive

It may well be a Hoopoe, but we simply don't have enough information, and in my experience Jays can be tame. Only yesterday for example, on here someone described a bird as being about the size of (American) Robin, so you would think that would rule out White-throated Sparrow, but that's what the bird turned out to be.
 
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Nutcracker

Stop Brexit!
It may well be a Hoopoe, but we simply don't have enough information, and in my experience Jays can be tame. ....
And Hoopoes can also be extremely flighty! One in Northumbs a few years ago would flush if it saw anyone from about 200 metres, and when it flew, it wouldn't stop until it had gone at least another 400-500 m further from those who flushed it :eek!:
 

WACCOE

Marching on Together
And Hoopoes can also be extremely flighty! One in Northumbs a few years ago would flush if it saw anyone from about 200 metres, and when it flew, it wouldn't stop until it had gone at least another 400-500 m further from those who flushed it :eek!:
Hoopoes can also be tame the one in Collingham recently wasn't concerned despite been surrounded by lots of birders and photographers.
 

marty31

Member
Hoopoes can also be tame the one in Collingham recently wasn't concerned despite been surrounded by lots of birders and photographers.
thanks for the positive input, I am even more sure now even 100% the single bird was definitely not a jay! it was reasonably tame and approachable, you could see its pied wings, it was the correct size (smaller than a jay) the colouring was right, and when I walked over to get a better look, it cocked up its unmistakable crest, you could see its thin curved beak, it appeared to be feeding on ground that the farmer had just shifted bales of either hay or straw, it flew away when approached, bur returned 10-15 mins later, the only doubt I had was that I thought it shouldn't or couldn't be there in November.
 

RafaelMatias

Unknown member
Portugal
thanks for the positive input, I am even more sure now even 100% the single bird was definitely not a jay! it was reasonably tame and approachable, you could see its pied wings, it was the correct size (smaller than a jay) the colouring was right, and when I walked over to get a better look, it cocked up its unmistakable crest, you could see its thin curved beak, it appeared to be feeding on ground that the farmer had just shifted bales of either hay or straw, it flew away when approached, bur returned 10-15 mins later, the only doubt I had was that I thought it shouldn't or couldn't be there in November.

I think your detailed description leaves no margin for error, very nice! :t:
 

Deb Burhinus

Used to be well known! 😎
Europe
And Hoopoes can also be extremely flighty! One in Northumbs a few years ago would flush if it saw anyone from about 200 metres, and when it flew, it wouldn't stop until it had gone at least another 400-500 m further from those who flushed it :eek!:

on the Continent, they are very confiding birds, frequenting back gardens - any bird would be ‘flighty’ with a horde of twitchers flushing it!

The description clearly rules out any other species
 

dantheman

Bah humbug
Nice one! You should report it to your local county bird club.

Wrt flightiness or not - in my experience the ones in S France are just as flighty as the local Blackbirds ie quite nervous on the whole. Feeding on lawns frequently as they do they can be more approachable at times.

Not sure that hordes of twitchers have ever flushed a Hoopoe though!
 

Larry Sweetland

Formerly 'Larry Wheatland'
thanks for the positive input, I am even more sure now even 100% the single bird was definitely not a jay! it was reasonably tame and approachable, you could see its pied wings, it was the correct size (smaller than a jay) the colouring was right, and when I walked over to get a better look, it cocked up its unmistakable crest, you could see its thin curved beak, it appeared to be feeding on ground that the farmer had just shifted bales of either hay or straw, it flew away when approached, bur returned 10-15 mins later, the only doubt I had was that I thought it shouldn't or couldn't be there in November.

That'll do :t:B :)
 

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