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ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

Can you see red panda independently? (1 Viewer)

Winterdune

Well-known member
Hi all,

I'm aware of the Red Panda Network trips but just wondered if there is anywhere in the world where it's possible to see them independently. Or maybe with a guide for a couple of days if necessary.

Thanks
Sean
 

kitefarrago

Well-known member
Travelling independently in China is not easy, but if you can get yourself to Labahe then I would have thought you'd have good chances of seeing them. We spent one morning going up the road by park bus and walking down, and from that admittedly single experience it seems that: They sleep in the trees, eventually the sun warms them up (this is in a valley and so it takes the sun a while to come up), and then they start moving. When they start moving they occasionally cross the road. We had four in a single morning there (one spotted while still sleeping and the others while we were walking down the road, in the hour or so after).

Andrea
 

jurek

Well-known member
Yes, you can although the easy site - Labahe in China - is apparently closed for redevelopment. There is every indication it will reopen in 1-2 years max and red pandas will still be easily to find.

There is a number of other sites in China and also Nepal, India etc, but they are not so reliable.

I suggest checking reports on mammalwatching.com.
 

amears

Well-known member
Have heard they are seen more often by ‘tourists’ than birders because the talking/chat disturbs them and makes them move...
 

Britseye

Well-known member
Sandakphu on the Nepal / India border may be your best bet.

Name didn't ring a bell at first, but now I think about it, it does. I was still shooting with a 500mm wildlife lens back when I did the trek in 1995, and when my friend picked this up in the tops of the trees at midday somewhere near Garibans, boy was I glad I was carrying that lens.
 

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DMW

Well-known member
Name didn't ring a bell at first, but now I think about it, it does. I was still shooting with a 500mm wildlife lens back when I did the trek in 1995, and when my friend picked this up in the tops of the trees at midday somewhere near Garibans, boy was I glad I was carrying that lens.

Brilliant shot! Great pose and very atmospheric.
 

b_reynolds_ak

Well-known member
Name didn't ring a bell at first, but now I think about it, it does. I was still shooting with a 500mm wildlife lens back when I did the trek in 1995, and when my friend picked this up in the tops of the trees at midday somewhere near Garibans, boy was I glad I was carrying that lens.

What an incredible capture. Its hard sometimes to justify carrying big glass, but when an opportunity presents itself like that, you completely forget about the inconvenience.
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia
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