• Welcome to BirdForum, the internet's largest birding community with thousands of members from all over the world. The forums are dedicated to wild birds, birding, binoculars and equipment and all that goes with it.

    Please register for an account to take part in the discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.
Feel the intensity, not your equipment. Maximum image quality. Minimum weight. The new ZEISS SFL, up to 30% less weight than comparable competitors.

Canon 18X50 IS Binoculars (1 Viewer)

gfletcher

New member
Hi guys
I have recently acquired a pair of Canon 18X50 IS binoculars and was looking for your views as to how suitable they maybe for bird watching.
thanks
Graham
 

AlanFrench

Well-known member
A steady, handheld 18x view of birds is quite nice, but they are, for most people, too heavy to carry around in the field much. Their narrow field can make birds a bit hard to spot and follow around, but experience helps some. They also have very poor focus, 6m (19.7'), which can be a problem in some situations.

I sometimes leave my 15x50s where they are handy to check the birds at my feeders. They are not my choice when I am wandering around looking for birds.

Clear skies, Alan
 

Binocollector

Well-known member
Germany
I sometimes use mine for birding when I wanna have a closer look. But I don't use them quite as much as I had thought I would. I bought them mainly for astronomy but for that purpose the weight is even more annoying than when holding them horizontally. The views are spectacular though. But my most used binos are in the 8x to 10x range.
 

BinoBoy

Well-known member
They make a great spotting scope substitute. Get a sling strap, like an Op/Tech Utility Sling strap or a Vortex Archer's Strap and wear them cross body with a lower power binocular around your neck. That way, you can just swing them up when you need to make a long range ID. They are also great for shorebirds, raptors in flight and just close looks at waterfowl, etc. They are far easier to take on a long walk than a scope. I actually know an expert birder who uses a 15x50 IS for warblers. I wouldn't have even tried that, but it apparently works for her.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top