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Chlorospingus (1 Viewer)

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Chlorospingus ophthalmicus

Denisse Maldonado-Sánchez, Carla Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, Juan Francisco Ornelas. Genetic divergence in the common bush-tanager Chlorospingus ophthalmicus (Aves: Emberizidae) throughout Mexican cloud forests: the role of geography, ecology and Pleistocene climatic fluctuations. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. Accepted Manuscript, Available online 14 March 2016.

[Abstract]
 

Richard Klim

-------------------------
Maldonado-Sánchez et al

Denisse Maldonado-Sánchez, Carla Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, Juan Francisco Ornelas. Genetic divergence in the common bush-tanager Chlorospingus ophthalmicus (Aves: Emberizidae) throughout Mexican cloud forests: the role of geography, ecology and Pleistocene climatic fluctuations. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. Accepted Manuscript, Available online 14 March 2016. [Abstract]
[Fig 1] [Fig 2] [Fig 3]
4.4. Taxonomic implications
Previous studies based on coding mtDNA fragments and morphological traits have suggested that the C. ophthalmicus species complex is composed of several lineages, each one restricted to a different mountain range (García-Moreno et al., 2004; Sánchez-Gónzalez et al., 2007; Bonaccorso et al., 2008): C. ophthalmicus-Sierra Madre Oriental, C. wetmorei-Sierra de Los Tuxtlas, C. albifrons-Sierra Madre del Sur, C. dwighti-central highlands of Chiapas, and C. postocularis-Pacific slope of Chiapas. Our investigation based on mtDNA and microsatellites analyses supports these previous studies, proving further evidence that each of these lineages has evolved independently and need to be treated as separate species according to de Queiroz (2007). Although gene flow was detected between morphotectonic provinces of the Sierra Madre Oriental, our results suggest that C. ophthalmicus from these provinces are also genetically differentiated. Detailed morphological and behavioural studies of individuals from populations along the SMO are necessary to further investigate whether the detected genetic differentiation is concordant with patterns of variation on phenotypic traits.
  • Chlorospingus [flavopectus] ophthalmicus - Brown-headed Bush Tanager
  • Chlorospingus [flavopectus] wetmorei - Wetmore's Bush Tanager
  • Chlorospingus [flavopectus] albifrons - White-fronted Bush Tanager
  • Chlorospingus [flavopectus] dwighti - Dwight's Bush Tanager
  • Chlorospingus [flavopectus] postocularis - Dusky-headed Bush Tanager
Hilty 2011 (HBW 16).​
(See also: Scientific name of Common Bush Tanager.)
 
Last edited:

Melanie

Well-known member
Germany

A taxonomic assessment of Chlorospingus flavopectus phaeocephalus and Chlorospingus semifuscus (Passeriformes: Passerellidae), including the description of a new subspecies


MANUEL SÁNCHEZ-NIVICELA+ JORGE ENRIQUE AVENDAÑO+ JUAN C. SÁNCHEZ-NIVICELA+ ANA TORRES+ JÉRÔME FUCHS+ BENTLEY BIRD+ ELISA BONACCORSO+


Abstract​


Chlorospingus flavopectus, a widely distributed member of the New World sparrows and finches (Passerellidae), is among the most variable and complex Neotropical bird species. With up to 28 subspecies that inhabit montane forest from Mexico south to Argentina, it presents a recurring leapfrog pattern, with many genetically differentiated lineages, but even more morphologically distinguishable taxa. Chlorospingus flavopectus phaeocephalus is distributed along the eastern Andean slope (from southern Colombia to northern Peru) and in localized patches along the central and southwestern slopes of the Ecuadorian Andes, in the forest remnants of Chimborazo, El Oro, and adjacent Loja provinces. This allopatric distribution was based on plumage similarities, but no genetic or vocal analysis has tested if these populations share a common ancestry. Here, we compared data for populations of C. f. phaeocephalus, C. semifuscus semifuscus from northwest Ecuador, and C. s. livingstoni from west Colombia, and analyzed them in the context of other Chlorospingus. Our phylogenetic analyses revealed that the putative west Ecuadorian populations of C. f. phaeocephalus are nested within C. semifuscus. They also present diagnostic characters when compared to other populations of C. semifuscus and C. f. phaeocephalus. Based on these results, we recognize the population from El Oro and adjacent Loja Provinces as a new subspecies of C. semifuscus, and the population from Chimborazo Province as a morphological variation of C. s. semifuscus.

 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France

A taxonomic assessment of Chlorospingus flavopectus phaeocephalus and Chlorospingus semifuscus (Passeriformes: Passerellidae), including the description of a new subspecies


MANUEL SÁNCHEZ-NIVICELA+ JORGE ENRIQUE AVENDAÑO+ JUAN C. SÁNCHEZ-NIVICELA+ ANA TORRES+ JÉRÔME FUCHS+ BENTLEY BIRD+ ELISA BONACCORSO+


Abstract​


Chlorospingus flavopectus, a widely distributed member of the New World sparrows and finches (Passerellidae), is among the most variable and complex Neotropical bird species. With up to 28 subspecies that inhabit montane forest from Mexico south to Argentina, it presents a recurring leapfrog pattern, with many genetically differentiated lineages, but even more morphologically distinguishable taxa. Chlorospingus flavopectus phaeocephalus is distributed along the eastern Andean slope (from southern Colombia to northern Peru) and in localized patches along the central and southwestern slopes of the Ecuadorian Andes, in the forest remnants of Chimborazo, El Oro, and adjacent Loja provinces. This allopatric distribution was based on plumage similarities, but no genetic or vocal analysis has tested if these populations share a common ancestry. Here, we compared data for populations of C. f. phaeocephalus, C. semifuscus semifuscus from northwest Ecuador, and C. s. livingstoni from west Colombia, and analyzed them in the context of other Chlorospingus. Our phylogenetic analyses revealed that the putative west Ecuadorian populations of C. f. phaeocephalus are nested within C. semifuscus. They also present diagnostic characters when compared to other populations of C. semifuscus and C. f. phaeocephalus. Based on these results, we recognize the population from El Oro and adjacent Loja Provinces as a new subspecies of C. semifuscus, and the population from Chimborazo Province as a morphological variation of C. s. semifuscus.

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ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia

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