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Civilan B&L Mk28, I think. (1 Viewer)

rdnzl

Not Sure.
Civilian B&L Mk28, I think.

I have these coming to me next week. Made in 1945, I think they are the civilian version of the Mk28. They don't have a Mk number on them. Just BU and the serial number. They look amazingly clean, and come with the Hood case and strap. I'm excited to finally own a B&L from this era.

How well will they work for birding?
 

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WJC

Well-known member
I have these coming to me next week. Made in 1945, I think they are the civilian version of the Mk28. They don't have a Mk number on them. Just BU and the serial number. They look amazingly clean, and come with the Hood case and strap. I'm excited to finally own a B&L from this era.

How well will they work for birding?

They’re Navy Mk 28s. The civilian version came in a leather case. Those backplates could have been changed out more than once and the Navy had plenty of B&L generic plates.

Birders are not fond of individual focus binos. :cat:

Bill
 

rdnzl

Not Sure.
Thanks Bill. I see your point about IF. Not exactly speedy for birding. But I have plenty of birds who just sit in the trees and on the fence posts in my yard I can use them on. :) They should be pretty good for stargazing, I would think.
 

WJC

Well-known member
Thanks Bill. I see your point about IF. Not exactly speedy for birding. But I have plenty of birds who just sit in the trees and on the fence posts in my yard I can use them on. :) They should be pretty good for stargazing, I would think.

I once laid back on a pile of tarps next to the funnel on USS Grand Canyon while out at sea. There was warmth from the stack to keep me warm, vibrations from the engine trying to rock me to sleep, and with the closest streetlight a hundred miles away, a Mk 28 was pure magic. :cat:

Bill
 

rdnzl

Not Sure.
I once laid back on a pile of tarps next to the funnel on USS Grand Canyon while out at sea. There was warmth from the stack to keep me warm, vibrations from the engine trying to rock me to sleep, and with the closest streetlight a hundred miles away, a Mk 28 was pure magic. :cat:

Bill

I have a couple spots way up in the mountains where on a moonless night, the sky looks like a blanket of stars. I take a few bins and a telescope or two. But I enjoy laying back on a cot under the stars with binoculars the most. I get what you mean by magic. For sure.
 

rdnzl

Not Sure.
Here are some photos and impressions, now that I have them in my hands. Impressions from someone who has never owned or viewed through anything like them. So I am sure many of you know how good these are.



They are massive compared to all of my other 7x50's. A very imposing piece of hardware. But the design is great. They feel really good when brought to my eyes. Not as heavy as they look. My hands automatically assume the proper hold. The curves guide my fingers to the proper place. I do not wear glasses. The eye cups go right up against my orbital sockets and make a nice "seal". They are very clean, and the focusers are very smooth. Not a mark on the glass and not a single spec of dust inside. I am amazed at the condition they are in.



The case is also in excellent condition, and has the original strap. It is built like a tank. Sturdiest binocular case I have ever encountered.



Daytime views are really good. Very sharp focus, and quite bright. Collimation seems to be spot on. I imagine they will be very good after dark. I can't wait to try them tonight. Hopefully the haze we've been having in the evenings and after dark will not be present tonight.
 

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Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Hello Rdnzl,

You might try them on the Perseids, which are just past their peak.

Stay safe,
Arthur :hi:
 

Binastro

Well-known member
The chances of seeing a Perseid with a binocular are pretty slim.

I have seen a fireball in the Canon 18x50 IS and I almost fell over in shock.

Unaided eyes are best for most meteors, although I have occasionally caught a meteor with a binocular.

Regards,
B.
 

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