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Colour blind (1 Viewer)

binfield

Well-known member
Can somebody who is Colour blind be any good at this Hobby. I work with a person who is colour blind, quite a good wild life photographer and is showing a keen interest in birds. I would never discourage him from chasing after birds every weekend but part of me thinks it wont last because of his Disability (if that's what you would call it ? ). I must admit he has a knack for spotting birds ,in fact it's bordering on gifted the amount he points out .
 

MJB

Well-known member
Can somebody who is Colour blind be any good at this Hobby. I work with a person who is colour blind, quite a good wild life photographer and is showing a keen interest in birds. I would never discourage him from chasing after birds every weekend but part of me thinks it wont last because of his Disability (if that's what you would call it ? ). I must admit he has a knack for spotting birds ,in fact it's bordering on gifted the amount he points out .

I've quite a few friends whose vision is colour-deficient but who are not only keen birders, but are world birders. The commonest kind is red-green confusion, but it isn't to a consistent degree for all affected. Men are much more likely to suffer colour-deficient vision, and so some of my friends always go birding with their better half!

Interestingly, it seems that the extent to which red and green can't be distinguished for some people may differ between the birds seen and the illustrations in the field guides, due to the colour-composition in the feathers being different from the pigment-mix of the printed colours. In addition, not all feather colours are pigment-based: blues and greens tend to be a construct of selective absorption of white light.

Your friend should be encouraged by my experience birding in Australia with someone who could still identify green and red-plumaged parrots amongst green foliage and red banksia!
MJB
 

Mike C

Emeritus President at Burnage Rugby Club
With importance of jizz and calls/song it would make sense for him to get out and give it a go.
If his eye sight prices to be an insurmountable problem, at least he knows
 

Nutcracker

Stop Brexit!
Could be a very good birder - colour-blind people often have more rods (light/motion detecting) to make up for fewer cones (colour detecting), so they can be more aware of bird movement than most of us.

Worth adding too there's some blind birders around too, and they can be exceptionally good on picking up and distinguishing bird sounds (and remember in woodlands at least, even for fully sighted people, 90% of bird finding is hearing rather than seeing).
 

binfield

Well-known member
Could be a very good birder - colour-blind people often have more rods (light/motion detecting) to make up for fewer cones (colour detecting), so they can be more aware of bird movement than most of us.

Worth adding too there's some blind birders around too, and they can be exceptionally good on picking up and distinguishing bird sounds (and remember in woodlands at least, even for fully sighted people, 90% of bird finding is hearing rather than seeing).

I totally agree with what you say about Bird movement. I have only been out a few times with him and he does have Knack of picking up birds. From tall trees to bushes he can point something out. Ive just given him a Collins guide for when he is out with the camera on his own. Hopefully he will edge more towards birding once he gets to know a few bird names.:t:
 

Keith Dickinson

Well-known member
Opus Editor
Give your friend all the encouragement you can, he will become a better birder with time. I have bad enough colour vision to stop me passing colour vision test for RAF but it hasn't stopped me from enjoying birding. I do have trouble with birds against foliage sometimes but if there is movement then I have them nailed. Worst problem for me is the birds with dark plumage - I have difficulty differentiating dark shades, worst being reds and greens but blues can give me trouble if the light is poor. However there are usually enough clues that don't rely on colour to allow me to id the majority of birds.
 
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