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Convenience vs performance. What do you choose? (1 Viewer)

Chosun Juan

Given to Fly
Australia - Aboriginal
I think any recommendations to use the Canon IS models are more likely to be found on AllCephalopoda.com rather than Allbinos.com because you need the dexterity of an octopus to use one. I find even holding the reasonably weighted 12x36 IS III is very unsteady - necessitating operating the IS ! Perhaps that's part of their plan ! :-O





Chosun :gh:
 

etudiant

Registered User
Supporter
I think any recommendations to use the Canon IS models are more likely to be found on AllCephalopoda.com rather than Allbinos.com because you need the dexterity of an octopus to use one. I find even holding the reasonably weighted 12x36 IS III is very unsteady - necessitating operating the IS ! Perhaps that's part of their plan ! :-O

Chosun :gh:

Honestly, Chosun, this is beneath you.
Usage is pretty simple, just push the inconveniently located button. Cephalopods need not apply.
After the IS kicks in, all is forgiven anyways.
 

Chosun Juan

Given to Fly
Australia - Aboriginal
Honestly, Chosun, this is beneath you.
Usage is pretty simple, just push the inconveniently located button. Cephalopods need not apply.
After the IS kicks in, all is forgiven anyways.

Lol :-O I'm just saying how they feel in the hand for me :)

(also, someone was having a dig at Dennis which was out of order, so I thought I'd have a bit of fun showing them the error of their ways and take it to the nth degree :) :cat:

It's welcome having Canon in the space (I'm a big fan of using Porro II prisms) , now Nikon too ...... it's just for me there's some big ergonomic, and other engineering issues to be solved before it becomes a realistic option for my generalist uses. They've both done reasonably well with the UX for cameras, so there's hope for the future.

If people find they work for them, and they love them now - then that's great :t:






Chosun :gh:
 

wdc

Well-known member
It just depends on my observing goals.

If I am going for a causal hike in the woods, then light weight bino are taken,
if looking at shore birds or distant raptors, then bigger binoculars;
but all optics are chosen with some degree of bondings or fit.

I have about a dozen pair. Of those the 8.5x42s are the best all around pair,
but each of the others are better for their nitch in observing--"the right tool for the job"

an example--I was excited when the Nikon WXs came out-these were clearly the best quality binoculars available,
but even if I could have afforded them, the weight and cost made them noncompetitive with what I have.

edj

^ this.

In addition: The binocular needs to fit the individual. As the OP said, there is no right answer here. Good BF question.

-Bill
 

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