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Corvoidea (1 Viewer)

albertonykus

Well-known member
Peona, V., V.E. Kutschera, M.P. . Blom, M. Irestedt, and A. Suh (2022)
Satellite DNA evolution in Corvoidea inferred from short and long reads
Molecular Ecology (advance online publication)
doi: 10.1111/mec.16484

Satellite DNA (satDNA) is a fast-evolving portion of eukaryotic genomes. The homogeneous and repetitive nature of such satDNA causes problems during the assembly of genomes, and therefore it is still difficult to study it in detail in non-model organisms as well as across broad evolutionary timescales. Here, we combined the use of short-read and long-read data to explore the diversity and evolution of satDNA between individuals of the same species and between genera of birds spanning ~40 millions of years of bird evolution using birds-of-paradise (Paradisaeidae) and crow (Corvus) species. These avian species highlighted the presence of a GC-rich Corvoidea satellitome composed of 61 satellite families and provided a set of candidate satDNA monomers for being centromeric on the basis of length, abundance, homogeneity and transcription. Surprisingly, we found that the satDNA of crow species rapidly diverged between closely related species while the satDNA appeared more similar between birds-of-paradise species belonging to different genera.
 

jts1882

Well-known member
United Kingdom
I wonder if that will be adopted. There is a good case for the new families due to the age of the split and for taxonomic stability (keeping the vireo family traditional), but the larger family has already been adopted by most authorities. Is a further change condusive to taxonomic stability? Perhaps subfamilies?
 

Melanie

Well-known member
Germany
The family Lamproliidae (Schodde & Christidis, 2014) was also never considered as valid though Eutrichomyias rowleyi is more closely related to Rhipiduridae than to Monarchidae.
 

albertonykus

Well-known member
McCullough, J.M., C. Oliveros, B.W. Benz, R. Zenil-Ferguson, J. Cracraft, R.G. Moyle, and M.J. Andersen (2022)
Wallacean and Melanesian Islands promote higher rates of diversification within the global passerine radiation Corvides
Systematic Biology (advance online publication)
doi: 10.1093/sysbio/syac044

The complex island archipelagoes of Wallacea and Melanesia have provided empirical data behind integral theories in evolutionary biology, including allopatric speciation and island biogeography. Yet, questions regarding the relative impact of the layered biogeographic barriers, such as deep-water trenches and isolated island systems, on faunal diversification remain underexplored. One such barrier is Wallace’s Line, a significant biogeographic boundary that largely separates Australian and Asian biodiversity. To assess the relative roles of biogeographic barriers—specifically isolated island systems and Wallace’s Line—we investigated the tempo and mode of diversification in a diverse avian radiation, Corvides (Crows and Jays, Birds-of-paradise, Vangas, and allies). We combined a genus-level dataset of thousands of ultraconserved elements (UCEs) and a species-level, 12-gene Sanger sequence matrix to produce a well-resolved supermatrix tree that we leveraged to explore the group’s historical biogeography and effects of biogeographic barriers on their macroevolutionary dynamics. The tree is well-resolved and differs substantially from what has been used extensively for past comparative analyses within this group. We confirmed that Corvides, and its major constituent clades, arose in Australia and that a burst of dispersals west across Wallace’s Line occurred after the uplift of Wallacea during the mid-Miocene. We found that dispersal across this biogeographic barrier were generally rare, though westward dispersals were two times more frequent than eastward dispersals. Wallacea’s central position between Sundaland and Sahul no doubt acted as a bridge for island-hopping dispersal out of Australia, across Wallace’s Line, to colonize the rest of Earth. In addition, we found that the complex island archipelagoes east of Wallace’s Line harbor the highest rates of net diversification and are a substantial source of colonists to continental systems on both sides of this biogeographic barrier. Our results support emerging evidence that island systems, particularly the geologically complex archipelagoes of the Indo-pacific, are drivers of species diversification.
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
McCullough, J.M., C. Oliveros, B.W. Benz, R. Zenil-Ferguson, J. Cracraft, R.G. Moyle, and M.J. Andersen (2022)
Wallacean and Melanesian Islands promote higher rates of diversification within the global passerine radiation Corvides
Systematic Biology (advance online publication)
doi: 10.1093/sysbio/syac044

The complex island archipelagoes of Wallacea and Melanesia have provided empirical data behind integral theories in evolutionary biology, including allopatric speciation and island biogeography. Yet, questions regarding the relative impact of the layered biogeographic barriers, such as deep-water trenches and isolated island systems, on faunal diversification remain underexplored. One such barrier is Wallace’s Line, a significant biogeographic boundary that largely separates Australian and Asian biodiversity. To assess the relative roles of biogeographic barriers—specifically isolated island systems and Wallace’s Line—we investigated the tempo and mode of diversification in a diverse avian radiation, Corvides (Crows and Jays, Birds-of-paradise, Vangas, and allies). We combined a genus-level dataset of thousands of ultraconserved elements (UCEs) and a species-level, 12-gene Sanger sequence matrix to produce a well-resolved supermatrix tree that we leveraged to explore the group’s historical biogeography and effects of biogeographic barriers on their macroevolutionary dynamics. The tree is well-resolved and differs substantially from what has been used extensively for past comparative analyses within this group. We confirmed that Corvides, and its major constituent clades, arose in Australia and that a burst of dispersals west across Wallace’s Line occurred after the uplift of Wallacea during the mid-Miocene. We found that dispersal across this biogeographic barrier were generally rare, though westward dispersals were two times more frequent than eastward dispersals. Wallacea’s central position between Sundaland and Sahul no doubt acted as a bridge for island-hopping dispersal out of Australia, across Wallace’s Line, to colonize the rest of Earth. In addition, we found that the complex island archipelagoes east of Wallace’s Line harbor the highest rates of net diversification and are a substantial source of colonists to continental systems on both sides of this biogeographic barrier. Our results support emerging evidence that island systems, particularly the geologically complex archipelagoes of the Indo-pacific, are drivers of species diversification.
I contacted the corresponding author to try to get the paper. Unless someone here can get it
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
Looking at the figure on the additional file, I come to the conclusion that the genera Metabolus, Pomarea, Mayrornis, Clytorhynchus, Chasiempis and Neolalage must become synonyms of Monarcha.
That new genera are needed for some Hylophilus and "Vireo" hypochryseus.
That Pteruthius must be split into three genera : Pteruthius, Aenopogon and a new genus for the distinctive "Pteruthius" xanthochlorus, because the long branches.
 
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Acanthis

Well-known member
Looking at the figure on the additional file, I come to the conclusion that the genera Metabolus, Pomarea, Mayrornis, Clytorhynchus, Chasiempis and Neolalage must become synonyms of Monarcha.
That new genera are needed for some Hylophilus and "Vireo" hypochryseus.
That Pteruthius must be split into three genera : Pteruthius, Aenopogon and a new genus for the distinctive "Pteruthius" xanthochlorus, because the long branches.
Jim could you email me a copy s'il vous plait? Merci in advance:)
 

Acanthis

Well-known member
Found some time to look over this today. Sorry authors I haven't read the text yet, just perusing the tree. :)
The detail seems to build well on the suggested classification of Jønsson et al 2016.
A couple of things I've picked up on: In that paper Vireolanius melitophrys was connected to Vireosylva which didn't seem correct. In this one the species is distantly related to the other shrike-vireos leaving the option of retaining Vireolanius for them all, or splitting of the green species in Smaragdolanius.
I think possibly the labels Platylophus and Eurocephalus have been transposed on the tree, as Eurocephalus is placed in Platylophidae and Platylophus in Laniidae!
 

Acanthis

Well-known member
Looking at the figure on the additional file, I come to the conclusion that the genera Metabolus, Pomarea, Mayrornis, Clytorhynchus, Chasiempis and Neolalage must become synonyms of Monarcha.
That new genera are needed for some Hylophilus and "Vireo" hypochryseus.
That Pteruthius must be split into three genera : Pteruthius, Aenopogon and a new genus for the distinctive "Pteruthius" xanthochlorus, because the long branches.
Chlorochroa for hypochryseus?
 

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