• Welcome to BirdForum, the internet's largest birding community with thousands of members from all over the world. The forums are dedicated to wild birds, birding, binoculars and equipment and all that goes with it.

    Please register for an account to take part in the discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.
Feel the intensity, not your equipment. Maximum image quality. Minimum weight. The new ZEISS SFL, up to 30% less weight than comparable competitors.

Crowned-Pigeons (1 Viewer)

Daniel Philippe

Well-known member
Bruxaux J., Gabrielli M., Ashari H., Prŷs-Jones R., Joseph L., Milá B., Besnard G. & Thébaud C., in press. Recovering the evolutionary history of crowned pigeons (Columbidae: Goura): implications for the biogeography and conservation of New Guinean lowland birds. Mol. Phylogen. Evol.

Abstract:

Assessing the relative contributions of immigration and diversification into the buildup of species diversity is key to understanding the role of historical processes in driving biogeographical and diversification patterns in species-rich regions. Here, we investigated how colonization, in situ speciation, and extinction history may have generated the present-day distribution and diversity of Goura crowned pigeons (Columbidae), a group of large forest-dwelling pigeons comprising four recognized species that are all endemic to New Guinea. We used a comprehensive geographical and taxonomic sampling based mostly on historical museum samples, and shallow shotgun sequencing, to generate complete mitogenomes, nuclear ribosomal clusters and independent nuclear conserved DNA elements. We used these datasets independently to reconstruct molecular phylogenies. Divergence time estimates were obtained using mitochondrial data only. All analyses revealed similar genetic divisions within the genus Goura and recovered as monophyletic groups the four species currently recognized, providing support for recent taxonomic changes based on differences in plumage characters. These four species are grouped into two pairs of strongly supported sister species, which were previously not recognized as close relatives: Goura sclaterii with Goura cristata, and Goura victoria with Goura scheepmakeri. While the geographical origin of the Goura lineage remains elusive, the crown age of 5.73 Ma is consistent with present-day species diversity being the result of a recent diversification within New Guinea. Although the orogeny of New Guinea's central cordillera must have played a role in driving diversification in Goura, cross-barrier dispersal seems more likely than vicariance to explain the speciation events having led to the four current species. Our results also have important conservation implications. Future assessments of the conservation status of Goura species should consider threat levels following the taxonomic revision proposed by del Hoyo and Collar (HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world 1: non-passerines, 2014), which we show to be fully supported by genomic data. In particular, distinguishing G. sclaterii from G. scheepmakeri seems to be particularly relevant.
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Bruxaux J., Gabrielli M., Ashari H., Prŷs-Jones R., Joseph L., Milá B., Besnard G. & Thébaud C., in press. Recovering the evolutionary history of crowned pigeons (Columbidae: Goura): implications for the biogeography and conservation of New Guinean lowland birds. Mol. Phylogen. Evol.

Abstract:

Assessing the relative contributions of immigration and diversification into the buildup of species diversity is key to understanding the role of historical processes in driving biogeographical and diversification patterns in species-rich regions. Here, we investigated how colonization, in situ speciation, and extinction history may have generated the present-day distribution and diversity of Goura crowned pigeons (Columbidae), a group of large forest-dwelling pigeons comprising four recognized species that are all endemic to New Guinea. We used a comprehensive geographical and taxonomic sampling based mostly on historical museum samples, and shallow shotgun sequencing, to generate complete mitogenomes, nuclear ribosomal clusters and independent nuclear conserved DNA elements. We used these datasets independently to reconstruct molecular phylogenies. Divergence time estimates were obtained using mitochondrial data only. All analyses revealed similar genetic divisions within the genus Goura and recovered as monophyletic groups the four species currently recognized, providing support for recent taxonomic changes based on differences in plumage characters. These four species are grouped into two pairs of strongly supported sister species, which were previously not recognized as close relatives: Goura sclaterii with Goura cristata, and Goura victoria with Goura scheepmakeri. While the geographical origin of the Goura lineage remains elusive, the crown age of 5.73 Ma is consistent with present-day species diversity being the result of a recent diversification within New Guinea. Although the orogeny of New Guinea's central cordillera must have played a role in driving diversification in Goura, cross-barrier dispersal seems more likely than vicariance to explain the speciation events having led to the four current species. Our results also have important conservation implications. Future assessments of the conservation status of Goura species should consider threat levels following the taxonomic revision proposed by del Hoyo and Collar (HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world 1: non-passerines, 2014), which we show to be fully supported by genomic data. In particular, distinguishing G. sclaterii from G. scheepmakeri seems to be particularly relevant.

TiF Update December 2 2017

Crowned-Pigeons: Sclater's Crowned-Pigeon, Goura sclaterii has been split from Southern Crowned-Pigeon, Goura scheepmakeri. See del Hoyo and Collar (2014) and Bruxaux et al. (2018). I have also adjusted the order of genera in Raphini based on Bruxaux et al.

IOC Updates Diary Dec 4

Post proposed split of Sclater’s Crowned Pigeon on Updates/PS
 

l_raty

laurent raty
Possible reasons might be
- to align the names with those already used by BirdLife,
- to avoid retaining the same name for a species with a significantly different taxonomic circumscription, and
- because scheepmakeri is actually not that more 'southern' than sclaterii...?

(Of course, if people pronounced Scheepmaker correctly (i.e., the first part, if anything, much closer to 'scape' than to 'sheep'), this particular misspelling would not be likely to happen.)

As promised by Christophe above (merci :t:!), the paper is now available [on ResearchGate].
 
Last edited:

Frank Gill

Well-known member
Possible reasons might be
- to align the names with those already used by BirdLife,
- to avoid retaining the same name for a species with a significantly different taxonomic circumscription, and
- because scheepmakeri is actually not that more 'southern' than sclaterii...?

(Of course, if people pronounced Scheepmaker correctly (i.e., the first part, if anything, much closer to 'scape' than to 'sheep'), this particular misspelling would not be likely to happen.)

As promised by Christophe above (merci :t:!), the paper is now available [on ResearchGate].

Thank you, Laurent, and Happy New Year to all
 

njlarsen

Gallery Moderator
Opus Editor
Supporter
Barbados
(Of course, if people pronounced Scheepmaker correctly (i.e., the first part, if anything, much closer to 'scape' than to 'sheep'), this particular misspelling would not be likely to happen.)

Excuse me, but in which language would that be the correct pronunciation?

Niels
 

l_raty

laurent raty
I hear those as (as I expected) SHR......
I admit it's not perfect, but the Dutch sound has no perfect match in English, hence perfection is arguably not possible. (What you have in mind with your rendering is presumably not an English 'shr' either...? Think 'shrew', for example.)
Anyway, a Dutch 'sch' starts as an 's', but ends in something that comes from much farther back in the throat (that might be likened to a Greek chi or a Spanish jota); the English 'sh' is a single uniform sound; thus miswriting the former as the latter doesn't seem very likely if you know the pronunciation. (Which was my main point.)
 

njlarsen

Gallery Moderator
Opus Editor
Supporter
Barbados
I agree that a Spanish "J" pronunciation is a rather good match for how I hear the second part of that Dutch sound.

Niels
 

Nutcracker

Stop Brexit!
I admit it's not perfect, but the Dutch sound has no perfect match in English, hence perfection is arguably not possible. (What you have in mind with your rendering is presumably not an English 'shr' either...? Think 'shrew', for example.)
Anyway, a Dutch 'sch' starts as an 's', but ends in something that comes from much farther back in the throat (that might be likened to a Greek chi or a Spanish jota); the English 'sh' is a single uniform sound; thus miswriting the former as the latter doesn't seem very likely if you know the pronunciation. (Which was my main point.)

I'd guess the closest in normal English is 'skeep-' like sch in 'school'. Not perfect, but better than 'sheep-'.
 
Warning! This thread is more than 5 years ago old.
It's likely that no further discussion is required, in which case we recommend starting a new thread. If however you feel your response is required you can still do so.

Users who are viewing this thread

Top