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Crypturellus tinamous (1 Viewer)

Richard Klim

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Laverde-R & Cadena (in press). Taxonomy and conservation: a tale of two tinamou species groups (Tinamidae, Crypturellus). J Avian Biol. [abstract]
...it appears that, minimally, the montane Colombian form castaneus merits recognition as a distinct biological species based on its remarkably different song and distinct elevational distribution (Fig. 2, 4). The degree of vocal and ecological differentiation between castaneus and other populations is comparable to, or even greater than, variation existing among good (i.e. reproductively isolated) species of tinamous (Cabot 1992, Maijer 1996), a criterion often used to treat allopatric populations as different species under the BSC (reviewed by Remsen 2005). Alternatively, if one were to follow species concepts based on diagnosability (e.g. the phylogenetic species concept, Cracraft 1983), which are often used in ornithology (Sangster 2014), then it is likely that several species would need to be recognized in the brown tinamou group. In turn, vocal variation does not support the split of C. erythropus into more species than currently recognized (Remsen et al. 2014) as has been suggested by some authors (Collar 1992, Renjifo et al. 2002, BirdLife International 2008). Intriguingly, our analyses indicate that C. kerriae, which has never been considered part of this group, exhibits songs within the range of vocal variation existing in C. erythropus, suggesting these two taxa may well be conspecific and that their phenotypic distinctiveness should be recognized at the subspecies level. ...
Cabot 1992 (HBW 1):
 
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Roy'N

Well-known member
SACC proposal from 2006 on splitting columbianus (Colombian Tinamou), idoneus (Santa Marta Tinamou) and saltuarius (Magdalena Tinamou) from C. erythropus (Red-legged Tinamou): http://www.museum.lsu.edu/~Remsen/SACCprop209-211.htm
Result was don't split and it looks like this was a good choice based on Laverde-R and Cadena's results.

Interesting that the analysis by Laverde-R and Cadena includes two sample recordings of saltuarius that were made in 2009 based on the appendix. A subspecies speculated by some as extinct and often said to be without recent records
 

Cadu Agne

Member
Yellow-legged Tinamou

Barbara Mizumo Tomotani, Luís Fábio Silveira. 2016. A REASSESSMENT OF THE TAXONOMY OF CRYPTURELLUS NOCTIVAGUS (WIED, 1820). RBO. 24(1), 34-45.

link pdf: http://www4.museu-goeldi.br/revistabrornito/revista/index.php/BJO/article/view/1356

abstract: Crypturellus noctivagus noctivagus (Wied, 1820) and C. noctivagus zabele (Spix, 1825) are endemic Brazilian tinamous restricted to Atlantic Forest and Caatinga, respectively. We used plumage, morphometric, vocal and oological characters to examine the validity of these taxa. Presence of sexual dimorphism in plumage only in birds occurring in Caatinga, and diagnostic differences in plumage pattern, tarsus color and egg color and shape allow us to recognize these two forms as distinct lineages, being considered here as Crypturellus noctivagus and Crypturellus zabele. We also provide updated diagnoses, descriptions, and geographic distributions for these two taxa.
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Crypturellus noctivagus zabele

Barbara Mizumo Tomotani, Luís Fábio Silveira. 2016. A REASSESSMENT OF THE TAXONOMY OF CRYPTURELLUS NOCTIVAGUS (WIED, 1820). RBO. 24(1), 34-45.

link pdf: http://www4.museu-goeldi.br/revistabrornito/revista/index.php/BJO/article/view/1356

abstract: Crypturellus noctivagus noctivagus (Wied, 1820) and C. noctivagus zabele (Spix, 1825) are endemic Brazilian tinamous restricted to Atlantic Forest and Caatinga, respectively. We used plumage, morphometric, vocal and oological characters to examine the validity of these taxa. Presence of sexual dimorphism in plumage only in birds occurring in Caatinga, and diagnostic differences in plumage pattern, tarsus color and egg color and shape allow us to recognize these two forms as distinct lineages, being considered here as Crypturellus noctivagus and Crypturellus zabele. We also provide updated diagnoses, descriptions, and geographic distributions for these two taxa.

Proposal (738) to SACC

Elevate Crypturellus noctivagus zabele to species rank
 
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