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Curaçao waders (1 Viewer)

Paalo

Well-known member
These waders were seen in Jan Kok Salt Pans in Curaçao December 23, 2005. Are they Semipalmated Sandpipers? Sorry for the poor quality of the image.
 

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To me they look more like Semi-p's. The legs don't seem to be greenish on my screen. Also the jizz is wrong for Least IMO...
 
Well I'm probably off-beam, but I get a Baird's feel about these. The middle bird esp. seems way too elongated for either semis or least, and the backs seem warm buff brown, certainly not grey and white.
 
Least Sandpipers for me. I do get a hint of color on the legs. The legs are often underexposed in pictures due to them being in the shadow of the bird. It would be unusual to see Baird's Sandpipers probing for food, particularly in the water. They would also be very unusual to see in Curaçao. The last sighting of the species being a single bird in 1977.
 
I get a feel of White-rumped Sandpiper which I cannot imagine is that rare in the area. I agree with the Fern that the rear is very long for a least sand.

Niels
 
I get a feel of White-rumped Sandpiper which I cannot imagine is that rare in the area. I agree with the Fern that the rear is very long for a least sand.

Niels


f it's true that Baird's is that rare there (I'm not familiar with the area, just looked at the ebird map.

I get a feel of White-rumped Sandpiper which I cannot imagine is that rare in the area. I agree with the Fern that the rear is very long for a least sand.

Niels
If it's true that Baird's really is rarer there than it is in the UK then these must be white-rumped (I'm not familiar with the area: just looked quickly at the ebird map which has a blob or 2 there). The bills and general proportions rule out least, semis etc. in my view. I really can't see yellowish legs on these either
 
Note that both Baird's and White-rumped have a very different structure, showing the longest primary projections within genus Calidris: on those 2 species the wings not only go a very long way beyond the tertial tips, they go well beyond the tail tip; in consequence they have a noticeably elongated shape. The birds in the OP photo have no obvious primary projection (the central bird is either missing the longest tertial or it looks obscure); the wing tips barely pass the tail tip (if at all). Both of those species can be ruled out as possibilities.
The birds are front heavy, with apparently pale leg colour (greenish?), one of them with a fine tipped bill, and the scapulars of the central bird have broad dark centres. Least Sandpipers for me.
 
Thank you all for your comments! Good to see its not only me that struggle with ID'ing these small sandpipers ..

Paalo
 
At the very most, but it's not clear what going on there (the tips are obscured). What is clear is that bairdii and fuscicollis are not possible.

EDIT: I'll attempt a proper analysis when I have a bit more of time, to try and produce a better answer to this. Hopefully today, but if not then tomorrow. Cheers
 
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Note that both Baird's and White-rumped have a very different structure, showing the longest primary projections within genus Calidris: on those 2 species the wings not only go a very long way beyond the tertial tips, they go well beyond the tail tip; in consequence they have a noticeably elongated shape. The birds in the OP photo have no obvious primary projection (the central bird is either missing the longest tertial or it looks obscure); the wing tips barely pass the tail tip (if at all). Both of those species can be ruled out as possibilities.
The birds are front heavy, with apparently pale leg colour (greenish?), one of them with a fine tipped bill, and the scapulars of the central bird have broad dark centres. Least Sandpipers for me.
Agreed. Cant see anything which is wrong, structurally, for Least Sandpiper.
 
When I commented before on the elongated shape it was in part because the wing extension beyond tail seemed quite large (taking missing feather into account). As it stands I can see it's on the long side for least, short for white-rumped or Baird's. For me this is a good example of birds that would have been easy and obvious in the field. I find them more difficult from this photo
 
I'm trying really hard to make it greenish legs but don't succeed. Anyway, I don't think it's reasonable to try to estimate the bill shape from that angle. For me they still look like Semi-p's. Agree that White-rumped would appear longer-winged.
 
Any other photos available Paalo or just that one? Given the light and shadow effect I don't think its much use trying to assess leg colour, which will more than likely look darker in this kind of image than what they actually are. I'm still struggling to see these birds as Semi-Ps
 
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