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ZEISS DTI thermal imaging cameras. For more discoveries at night, and during the day.

Current Sightings (1 Viewer)

Local hotspot this am:
Herring Gull
Double-Crested Cormorant
Broad-Winged Hawk
Alder Flycatcher
Solitary Vireo-Blue-Headed
Blue Jay
American Crow
Black-Capped Chickadee
Tree Swallow
Starling
Gray Catbird
Veery, heard
Lots of Cedar Waxwing
American Goldfinch
Song Sparrow
Ovenbird
Common Yellowthroat
American Redstart
Northern Parula
Yellow Warbler
Chestnut-Sided Warbler
Black-Throated Green Warbler
Canada Warbler
Indigo Bunting, FOY
 
A few pelagics while over the Grand Manan Banks yesterday:
A dozen or so Greater Shearwater
Oodles of Common Tern and Wilson's Storm Petrel
Plenty of Atlantic Puffin
Not so pelagic Herring Gull and Double Crested Cormorant

3 Humpback Whales and a Gray Seal
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Out for a crepuscular patrol and heard a first ever here at the outer homestead American Bittern song emanating from the woods behind a postage stamp sized boggy sphagnum pool, slowly being colonized by Rushes, Sedges and Blue Flag Iris. Listened for 15 minutes while feeding the mosquito hoard, with Common Nighthawk screeching above. Back at the homestead proper, I hear another Bittern singing from closer in and a distant second out further. Surprised by these as there is really only wet Alder/Winterberry thicket with sparse Spruce and Red Maple, hardly what I'd consider classic Bittern habitat. Plently of bull frogs in the muck though. Spooked a Timberdoodle into twittery flight while the duo of Hermit Thrush came in for their last lawn gleanings of the eve. And Coyotes, good howls nice and close.
 
Yesterday, foggy, light drizzle, pondside:
Things are quieting down, definitely less bird activity this year over last (One gauge being the 65lbs+ of black oil seed last year vs 25 lbs this Winter/spring at the feeder).
Ruffed Grouse drumming
Barred Owl
Song Sparrow
Gray Catbird
Alder or Willow Flycatcher, good view but no song to distinguish, and I can't otherwise.
Eastern Bluebird
Black-Throated Green
Broad-Winged Hawk soaring

Plenty of Azure Bluet Damselflies and White Tail Skimmer Dragonflies, Bull Frogs and a realtively fearless young Chipmunk
 
Downeast today for a drizzly/foggy coastal recce of the MCI NWR in attempts to start remedying my shorebird ineptitude.
Brief detour to check out the top end of Pinkham Bay:
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3 Great Blue Heron within minutes of arrival, 3 Bonaparte's Gull and a large bevy of, most likely, Common Tern, not Arctic-- too far to tell for sure, repeatedly hitting a school of something or other.
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Then down to a cove with a lot of activity but too little time to spend. Did spot about a dozen Canada Geese, 3 Willet, 2 Short-Billed Dowitcher, 2 adult Black-Bellied Plover and 2 juvenile-- I think, a Double Crested Cormorant and numerous UI Peeps just out of range of the 38WF on the 78ED. A Timberdoodle descended from above and led the car down the track for a spell on the way in. Hermit Thrushes and Ovenbirds singing in the woodland stretches. Stopped to glass any boggy backwaters traveling in, numerous N Pitcherplant blooms visible.
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Back to a local hotspot this foggy/drizzly am:
Northern Gannet flyover, a first for me.
Bevy of Herring Gulls
Double Crested Cormorant
Alder Flycatcher
Solitary Vireo/BH
American Crow
Black-Capped Chickadee
Tree Swallow tending a nest box
Gray Catbird
American Redstart
Veery, heard
Cedar Waxwings
Chipping Sparrow
Song sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Black Throated Green Warbler
 
Today's semi-complete tally of sightings:
Eastern Phoebe
Mourning Dove pair
Chipping Sparrow
Ruby-Throated Hummingbird at feeder and spied on a frequent perch, highest point of a distant dead Spruce snag over-looking its domain.
Hermit Thrushes
Winter Wren
Common Yellowthroat
Tufted Titmouse
Black Capped Chickadee
Red Breasted Nuthatch
ETA: A Black & White Warbler apparently using the Ovenbird tactic of a feigned broken wing and chirps as distraction around a nest?

Pondside lunch:
4 Eastern Bluebirds
Immature Bald Eagle sharing a thermal with a Turkey Vulture
Pair of Gray Catbird
Raven
Pine Warbler
Starling

Trilling Gray Treefrogs, one starts, 5 or 6 chime in from different treetops, goes on for 3 or so minutes, seems to set off the wood frogs, then bullfrogs, then quiet. If I sit there for an hour, I may hear this successional chorus once.
Azure Bluets
Common Whitetails
 
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Foggy coastal venue today
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Spied a f Gadwall in a tide pool behind the half moon bar above and a f Mallard out among the bladderwrack flotillas.
A family of 4 Winter Wren, looked to be 3 fledglings, all skulking around a clump of fallen tree debris on the wooded trail in, along with Hermit Thrush and Ovenbird. A few Crows kept up a lively chatter, also watched a duo of adult porcupine and its young'n waddle down into the beach peas.
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Lone Herring Gull perched in the fog
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Back at the homestead the American Bittern is still 0onk gahlunking away. No sign of him, not for want of trying though, White Throated Sparrow, Robin and Hermit Thrush providing soundtrack for my efforts.
 
Back up to MCI MWR of post #25 above on a beautiful day, perfect temps around 68-70 at the water but very little activity at low tide, just a few annoyed looking Herring gulls, 3 Black Guillemot, 2 Double Crested Cormorant and a probable Common Loon bobbing out a ways. Off I went to hike a trail down to the opposite side of this spikey peninsula and a rocky coastal jaunt across basalt dikes to a large tide pool and mud flat that was also empty. Myrtle, Yellow Warblers on the way. Back to initial location 3+ hours later and just past mid-tide. IIRC, they are about 16-18' feet here, spied 1 Great Black Backed Gull attempting to down a fish that appeared far too large for its mouth but it managed, 7 more annoyed Herring Gulls and 1 Willet perched on a bladderwrack covered rock of an 'island' apparently just enjoying the view all the while being chitted at by a Song Sparrow whom I gathered had a nest nearby. Didn't tarry long. Headed out to a tidal falls, incoming creating massive eddys of outgoing, odd to see water flowing both ways in one channel. A bevy of Common Eider taking refuge from the current and no doubt snacking on the influx and outflux of fish in the calm on the inland side of an island. 4 Common Tern, half dozen Cormorant perched on a ledge amidst the rips.

Pileated Woodpecker debarking a dead Spruce and Northern Flicker chipping the moss from between patio stones to get at ant larva at the homestead prior to departing this am. Sending this off after the Hermit Thrush, Ovenbird, Winter Wren evening chorus has ended and the coyotes chimed in.
 
A few visits to a couple of different spots this Solstice weekend, one coastal w/ fields and shoreline, the other a meandering flowage connecting two ponds and its final, now free flowing wooded course for anadromous fish-- after the old mill damn was removed--into the local tidal estuary. Had a quick glance at Northern Waterthrush at the latter (long time since encountering those), along with Black Throated Green, Northern Parula, Ovenbird and plenty of Ebony Jewelwing Damselflies. Location two gave me good sightings of 2 Veery I'd been hearing there the last few visits but have not seen anywhere in decades.
Others spied through fog and misty drizzle:
Common Loon
Bald Eagle
Osprey
Double Crested Cormorant
Oodles of Herring Gull
Black and White Warbler with fledglings
Yellow Warbler
Gray Catbird
Lots of Song Sparrow
Alder Flycatcher
Common Yellowthroat
And a female Redstart chasing a chipmunk out of the underbrush and across the road

Back at the homestead in more misty drizzle, the warblers were low and active:
Black Throated Green
Ovenbird-- can be signing 10' in front of me in open, mature forest and often still can't find them.
Black and White Warbler doing its feigned broken wing routine
Timberdoodle
Long view of a Brown Creeper
Hermit Thrush
Common Yellowthroat
Downy Woodpecker
Solitary Vireo, BH
American Bittern
2 Barred Owls calling
Coyotes

Liberated stream:
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Ebony Jewelwing
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Waterproof and water repellent lens coatings!
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A lot of woodpecker activity this am.
Adult F with 2 Downy Woodpecker fledglings going between suet feeder and ant larva in a dead snag, good to see the youngins are getting a bit of proper training.
Hairy Woodpeckers
Juvenile Red-Bellied Woodpecker, bit of a rarity here. While munching suet, it took a puff of feathers off of an incoming Hairy.
Broad-Winged Hawk, soaring low
Northern Parula with a beak full of caterpillars
Purple Finch duo
Tufted Titmouse
Northern Cardinal, an occasional visitor
Pine Warbler
Hermit Thrush alternating between Fly Honeysuckle berries and insects in the grass
Blue Jays strafing the feeders
Red-Breasted Nuthatch

Afternoon edit: Red-Eyed Vireo feeding caterpillars to 4 nestlings in a nicely woven hanging 'basket'
A Broad-Winged Hawk pair, looked to be M & F
A lot of Pileated woodpecker activity from a duo in a friends yard
 
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@VonMaunder,

More than 100 years, ago, Fannie Eckstorm wrote about Maine, its fauna and its Indian lore. You might want to look at her book The Woodpeckers. A bonus in the book are the colour illustrations by Louis Agassiz Fuertes.

Happy bird watching,
Arthur
Thank you Arthur, I wasn't familiar with that one. I've seen Eckstorm's name mentioned often in Maine's natural and native history. I thought I had something or other by her on the shelves, I know I've come across her Indian Place Names of the Penobscot Valley but what I do have is a book based on her research on Native canoe routes entitled Above the Gravel Bar-The Native Canoe Routes of Maine. I'll have to find a copy of The Woodpeckers.
 
Thank you Arthur, I wasn't familiar with that one. I've seen Eckstorm's name mentioned often in Maine's natural and native history. I thought I had something or other by her on the shelves, I know I've come across her Indian Place Names of the Penobscot Valley but what I do have is a book based on her research on Native canoe routes entitled Above the Gravel Bar-The Native Canoe Routes of Maine. I'll have to find a copy of The Woodpeckers.
Hello,

I have been in Maine only twice, each time rather briefly. Her book on woodpeckers, perhaps aimed at children, seems rather thorough but the colour plates by Louis Agassiz Fuertes truly standout. Folklore and bird watching seem to have been her greatest interests. As the book is well out of copyright, I will add one of the colour plates, a depiction of the northern flicker from the web.

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You can find other of her works at the Internet archive, but Above the Gravel Bar-The Native Canoe Routes of Maine is not listed.

Happy bird watching,
Arthur
 
Hello,

I have been in Maine only twice, each time rather briefly. Her book on woodpeckers, perhaps aimed at children, seems rather thorough but the colour plates by Louis Agassiz Fuertes truly standout. Folklore and bird watching seem to have been her greatest interests. As the book is well out of copyright, I will add one of the colour plates, a depiction of the northern flicker from the web.

You can find other of her works at the Internet archive, but Above the Gravel Bar-The Native Canoe Routes of Maine is not listed.

Happy bird watching,
Arthur
Beautiful plate and thank you again for the link, I saw another book listed there that references Eckstorm, The Wildest Country-Exploring Thoreau's Maine, another I have on the shelf here where she is cited. Above the Gravel Bar is just based on her notes, written by David S. Cook.
 
Much to the ire of the Downy Woodpecker clan, a Black Bear raided and stole one seed and the suet feeder this week. We heard the ruckus, about 10pm, as the 1/2" square, iron crook was flattened to the ground. Bear seemed to have scared itself off with the racket, but it returned later that night, flattening a wide swath through the Hay Scented Fern to claim its bounty. Both feeders were recovered about 80' into the woods where they were cleaned out.

From the homestead today:
Black & White Warbler
Northern Parula quickly scouring a close Poplar for caterpillars with much success.
Winter Wren
Hermit Thrush
Ovenbird
Pine Warbler
Solitary Vireo BH
Gray Catbird
Brown Creeper, good long view with the Zeiss of it hunting up a large White Pine
Red Breasted Nuthatch
Black Capped Chickadee
Hairy Woodpecker
Blue Jay
Northern Cardinal
Ruby Throated Hummingbird
Chipping Sparrow clan
A high soaring Broad-Winged Hawk, a middle height Immature Bald Eagle and a low circling Osprey sharing a thermal above the homestead. And a young woodchuck just waddled in to make the list. Only the second? time I've seen them here in 30 yrs.

Yesterday we took a trip a bit up N to a bog boardwalk, a bit crowded with folks whom I gathered would be just as happy walking down a city sidewalk as in a peat bog, as they often appeared to be going for # of steps via a Malus watch. I've seen a friend's NSA asset...err 'watch' count up 1/3 of a mile while stopped for 10 min of conversation, so pausing to see the birds or all of the blooming orchids and Pitcher plants should present NO problem! My sometimes judgemental twit of a self digresses. Saw very few birds, a Black & White Warbler low and close, a possible Northern Waterthrush but not a good look, lots of White Throated Sparrow singing. The Grass Pinks (Calopogon tuberosus), Northern White Fringed Orchis (Platanthera blephariglottis), a few remaining blooms of Rose Pogonia (Pogonia ophioglossoides) and the Northern Pitcher Plants stole the show. I left the camera behind, these taken by my partner on her Malus phone.
Grass Pink:
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White Fringed Orchis:
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N Pitcher Plant
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And Bloom:
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My dumbphone pics:
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Out to a local point this evening with rod and reel, going for the elusive-to me- Striped Bass. No luck but did see a Great Blue Heron on arrival, a bevy of graceful Common Tern for the duration, 2 Osprey, Herring Gulls, 3 Double Crested Cormorant and across the inlet on the far shore, Swainson's Thrush were signing along with an occasional Ovenbird.
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Hello Von Maunder,

I have been told that fishing is like bird watching: you should have been here, ten minutes, ago.

Happy nature observation,
Arthur
 

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