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CZ 8x30 (1 Viewer)

diverdude1

Active member
China
First thread, post? So. I'm learning how to do this. May be some difficulties getting started. Also please excuse English usage, haha. I'll try to ask question tmrw,, and show photos too.
 

diverdude1

Active member
China
I am very much considering purchasing a pair of what I believe to be CZ 8x30, but I am in China. I want to show pics and maybe translate some info and see what people here think. I want a good (very good) pair of bins, and I admire Vintage Products, and I admire German engineering. I hope these are ok and good. Medium to hi expensive for me. Maybe 300usd. Will post better detail as I learn this system. Late here, try again tmrw. xiexie
 

diverdude1

Active member
China
300usd roughly. Any comments?
 

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Patudo

Well-known member
Well made binocular, enjoyable to use, but...

- many examples are hazed up inside, which will require a professional service/cleaning job to clear - always check carefully for this;

- cannot be used with glasses/spectacles, but if your eyesight is good or you wear contact lenses, you'll be fine;

- will fog up in cold weather because the glass needs to be placed close to the naked eye;

- noticeably not as bright as modern binoculars thanks to the 1950s/60s era single coatings. Not a problem on a bright sunny day, but definitely makes itself apparent in darker conditions.

In summation: great for casual use/as a plaything, or if you are a collector/like to look at binoculars (which is not the same as looking through binoculars). But any good binocular from the 1990s or later will be more practical and useful for birding.

If USD300 is expensive to you, I strongly recommend you compare/test it very carefully against a more modern binocular before buying.
 

diverdude1

Active member
China
Well made binocular, enjoyable to use, but...

- many examples are hazed up inside, which will require a professional service/cleaning job to clear - always check carefully for this;

- cannot be used with glasses/spectacles, but if your eyesight is good or you wear contact lenses, you'll be fine;

- will fog up in cold weather because the glass needs to be placed close to the naked eye;

- noticeably not as bright as modern binoculars thanks to the 1950s/60s era single coatings. Not a problem on a bright sunny day, but definitely makes itself apparent in darker conditions.

In summation: great for casual use/as a plaything, or if you are a collector/like to look at binoculars (which is not the same as looking through binoculars). But any good binocular from the 1990s or later will be more practical and useful for birding.

If USD300 is expensive to you, I strongly recommend you compare/test it very carefully against a more modern binocular before buying.
Xiexie, I have no way of being with the set. It is purchase or not. Oh well, I am not as avid as most on here, so if they work ok, that's good enough for me. haha,, you all may think I'm silly, but I like them for the 'cool' factor. I realize new bins have a higher functionality.
 

diverdude1

Active member
China
One more thing if I may.... It seems when I find info online they say some of these models are 'B' models, and some are 'Non-B'. Do I have that right? If so, can anyone give a simple explanation. Thx much
 

garymh

Binocular Engineer
Hi,

'B' is short for the German word Brille which means spectacles.

The 'B' model has soft rubber eyecups which can be folded back to use with spectacles so that the field of view is not affected.

The non 'B' model has hard plastic eyecups (like in your picture) which will reduce the field of view if you wear spectacles when using them.


Gary
 

John A Roberts

Well-known member
Australia
Hi diverdude1,

For more information on the post-WWII Zeiss West 8x30's (including the two B versions) see at:


John
 

diverdude1

Active member
China
Hi,

'B' is short for the German word Brille which means spectacles.

The 'B' model has soft rubber eyecups which can be folded back to use with spectacles so that the field of view is not affected.

The non 'B' model has hard plastic eyecups (like in your picture) which will reduce the field of view if you wear spectacles when using them.


Gary
Thank you for the excellent explanation. No spectacles here,,,,, yet,,, :eek:
 

diverdude1

Active member
China
Hi diverdude1,

For more information on the post-WWII Zeiss West 8x30's (including the two B versions) see at:


John
Thank you so much for the excellent link.
 

Patudo

Well-known member
Xiexie, I have no way of being with the set. It is purchase or not. Oh well, I am not as avid as most on here, so if they work ok, that's good enough for me. haha,, you all may think I'm silly, but I like them for the 'cool' factor. I realize new bins have a higher functionality.

Lots and lots of people buy binoculars (especially Nazi era German binoculars) purely because of the 'cool factor' - so don't worry, you're not alone!

I've had two other people (not that experienced with binoculars) use my 8x30 non-B. Both of them seemed to enjoy using it and I do think that good binoculars from this era can still give good service, especially for the more casual user, if they are in good condition. Most Zeiss Wests in good exterior condition should be fine mechanically, but both my 8x30 and 10x50 needed their lenses and prisms cleaned of haze (carried out by garymh who responded earlier in the thread). Without this they would have been practically unusable. I would be quite reluctant to buy any older binocular unless I could have it cleaned/serviced. Are there shops/technicians in the PRC who offer this service?

PS. I understand Guangdong is quite hot and humid, a bit like parts of the American Southeast. If so, you may want to keep these binoculars in a dry box - as fungus can often develop in camera lenses and binoculars that are not fully sealed under those conditions.
 

diverdude1

Active member
China
Lots and lots of people buy binoculars (especially Nazi era German binoculars) purely because of the 'cool factor' - so don't worry, you're not alone!

I've had two other people (not that experienced with binoculars) use my 8x30 non-B. Both of them seemed to enjoy using it and I do think that good binoculars from this era can still give good service, especially for the more casual user, if they are in good condition. Most Zeiss Wests in good exterior condition should be fine mechanically, but both my 8x30 and 10x50 needed their lenses and prisms cleaned of haze (carried out by garymh who responded earlier in the thread). Without this they would have been practically unusable. I would be quite reluctant to buy any older binocular unless I could have it cleaned/serviced. Are there shops/technicians in the PRC who offer this service?

PS. I understand Guangdong is quite hot and humid, a bit like parts of the American Southeast. If so, you may want to keep these binoculars in a dry box - as fungus can often develop in camera lenses and binoculars that are not fully sealed under those conditions.
Ouch. :( I seriously doubt I could find anyone to service these here, but who knows. Anyway, I wouldn't try to do that. Let's put it simply, it is difficult to get anything done here, let alone something like servicing vintage binoculars. :)
Is a dry box just a dry box, or is it a special piece of equipment?
 

PYRTLE

Old Berkshire Boy
Might be worth asking the seller if these have ever been serviced, recollimated along with any appropriate paperwork. Out of interest where are they coming from? If Europe or North America they may be able to have them inspected and cleaned before shipment.
 

tenex

reality-based
Welcome to BF! (What is xiexie, not your name I think?) I totally understand the cool factor here. Case and all, this set is exactly like the Oberkochen (Zeiss West) 10x50 and 15x60 that our family had in the 1960s, and brings back fond memories. (If missing the real chamois lens cleaner with Zeiss logo, too bad.) It looks very well cared for, though photos 3 and 5 may show a bit of something on the bottom edge of the left objective, you could ask what it is. There are more practical choices for everyday birding (and this is the place to ask for recommendations!), but you didn't even say that's what you want them for... so it's up to you.
 

LPT

Well-known member
They’re definitely authentic but West German Oberkochen Zeiss, not Zeiss Jena. The company split in 1945. Today’s Zeiss is the West German one. The East German Zeiss Jena ceased operations circa 1990.
 

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