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Dead-set on the MHG 10x42 - am I getting tunnel vision? (1 Viewer)

jgraider

Well-known member
Indeed, glad you are enjoying. Nikon potentially discontinuing the x30 MHGs is interesting. I wonder if they're not selling well, if a new model might be on the horizon, or if this is worth considering as additional evidence of Nikon just quietly exiting the mid/upper tiers of the binocular market?


Nikon is slowly exiting the sport optics market IMO. It started with the rifle scope segment and then by re-doing the binocular warranties with less coverage. If it weren't for this I'd own the MHG 8x42.
 

chill6x6

Well-known member
Indeed, glad you are enjoying. Nikon potentially discontinuing the x30 MHGs is interesting. I wonder if they're not selling well, if a new model might be on the horizon, or if this is worth considering as additional evidence of Nikon just quietly exiting the mid/upper tiers of the binocular market?

Didn't know that... I can see why though....that model has always been slightly overpriced for its market IMO. For the same price I can get a 8X42 MHG with the same FOV and is still compact/lightweight for a 42mm.
 

pbjosh

missing the neotropics
Switzerland
Didn't know that... I can see why though....that model has always been slightly overpriced for its market IMO. For the same price I can get a 8X42 MHG with the same FOV and is still compact/lightweight for a 42mm.

Agreed Chuck - I really like my little 8x30MHG but I don't pretend that at MSRP it is a good value compared to the 42mm version. It is a bit of a niche product, really it only has one competitor, the CL-B. And if it's not selling well, c'est la vie perhaps.
 

NDhunter

Experienced observer
United States
Nikon is slowly exiting the sport optics market IMO. It started with the rifle scope segment and then by re-doing the binocular warranties with less coverage. If it weren't for this I'd own the MHG 8x42.

Johnny:
You are always negative posting about Nikon, and that is unfair.

You have no clue about how things are going forward.

Nikon is very big and popular in the binocular market, they make very good products.

Jerry
 

jgraider

Well-known member
You're right, It is my opinion which is why I put IMO in my post. Nikon has proven to me on 3 separate occasions to be inept in their customer service, and utterly clueless with facts regarding their products. I can't foresee the future, but I can see what they've done in the very recebt past, and that is a huge negative.
 

Arthur Red Rod

Well-known member
Can't the point be made that Nikon is definitely a little out-of-touch with the demands of the modern sporting market, but is still technologically capable of producing world-class optics? I think Nikon proved itself plenty with the EDG, Premier and even the MHG line of products - it's capable of delivering heavy hitters to the market. Perhaps the problem is a lack of strong direction?

I am just pontificating here, but if Nikon could somehow collaborate with Light Optical Works - a large OEM producer of many American-branded tactical riflescopes - and combine their production capacity and optical tech with LOW's decades of OEM design experience and knowledge of Western consumer needs, Japan could be putting out products that really take the market by storm.

It's just really bizarre that the manufacturing of some of the most reputable optical devices in the sporting market happen almost entirely in Japan (e.g., Vortex Razor line, Nightforce NXS scopes), yet no singular Japanese corporation or similar entity is levearging this into a powerful force of domestic production and export. There is just no way Japan can hope to compete with Western companies in this industry if they don't keep up to date with today's very picky and rapidly changing demands.
 

Ries

Well-known member
Netherlands
I read somewhere that Nikon made the choice to focus on photography instead of birding/hunting optics. Don't know why? Indeed almost every sporting optic product they produce has something strongly speaking for them, and they indeed could be a very strong player on that market. Is there too little money in it for them, compared to photography, and to much fuss or something? They almost seem to put out a serie of bins/scopes once every now and then as reminder that they're there, with short production without any after-availability of parts, seemingly not taking their sporting optics market position all too seriously. In the meantime each and every product (incl old ones like the ed78/82) is still among the top ones of many different best-of-lists...but never quite on top, which with effort I also feel they could be.
 

Arthur Red Rod

Well-known member
I read somewhere that Nikon made the choice to focus on photography instead of birding/hunting optics. Don't know why? Indeed almost every sporting optic product they produce has something strongly speaking for them, and they indeed could be a very strong player on that market. Is there too little money in it for them, compared to photography, and to much fuss or something? They almost seem to put out a serie of bins/scopes once every now and then as reminder that they're there, with short production without any after-availability of parts, seemingly not taking their sporting optics market position all too seriously. In the meantime each and every product (incl old ones like the ed78/82) is still among the top ones of many different best-of-lists...but never quite on top, which with effort I also feel they could be.

Yes, what we need is something like an "EDG Super" line to rocket on to the market. I have always respected Nikon for making the titans in Germany feel a little humility - a tsunami from the East!
 

eitanaltman

Well-known member
I can't speculate as to why, but Nikon seemed like it gave up on the alpha market after the EDG never got a real foothold with the big three Euro brands. Not sure I can blame them for instead bringing out a killer product in the popular sub-alpha $1K class, and maintaining their strength in the entry and mid level price points. Their Monarch 5 and 7 dominate the $500 and under class among casual birders from what I've seen in the field and leading tours. Even the new Monarch ED scope is priced to compete more with a Vortex Razor than with a Kowa or Swarovski.

Clearly they are capable of producing world class sport optics as good as anything produced anywhere, by anyone. The EDG 10x32 in my possession are absolutely brilliant, as well corrected a binocular as I've ever used. I'm sure for us binocular junkies it's fun to dream of an EDG-i-fied Monarch HG, bringing the more robust build and superior glass and coatings of the EDG to the slimmer/lighter chassis and especially the wider FOV of the MHG models.

The thought of a ~700g EDG-HG 8x42 with an 8.3 degree FOV makes my heart flutter. But I am realistic that it's probably not going to happen, as Nikon seems to have all but ceded the alpha binocular market to the Euro troika.
 

Arthur Red Rod

Well-known member
I can't speculate as to why, but Nikon seemed like it gave up on the alpha market after the EDG never got a real foothold with the big three Euro brands. Not sure I can blame them for instead bringing out a killer product in the popular sub-alpha $1K class, and maintaining their strength in the entry and mid level price points. Their Monarch 5 and 7 dominate the $500 and under class among casual birders from what I've seen in the field and leading tours. Even the new Monarch ED scope is priced to compete more with a Vortex Razor than with a Kowa or Swarovski.

Clearly they are capable of producing world class sport optics as good as anything produced anywhere, by anyone. The EDG 10x32 in my possession are absolutely brilliant, as well corrected a binocular as I've ever used. I'm sure for us binocular junkies it's fun to dream of an EDG-i-fied Monarch HG, bringing the more robust build and superior glass and coatings of the EDG to the slimmer/lighter chassis and especially the wider FOV of the MHG models.

The thought of a ~700g EDG-HG 8x42 with an 8.3 degree FOV makes my heart flutter. But I am realistic that it's probably not going to happen, as Nikon seems to have all but ceded the alpha binocular market to the Euro troika.

Eitan, your comment on the Monarch 5's and 7's dominating the middle market is reflected very strongly in my area as well. Everyone seems to be quite satisfied, save for some individuals who experienced issues with the armoring. Nikon seems to be more focused on securing large sectors of the market, rather than cutting-edge developments, at least in regards to sporting optics.

Whatever the case may be, if I ever stumble upon a Nikon exec in an elevator, I will ensure that my hypothetical EDG Super's will not only be made, but also surpass the FOV of the Swaro NL and beat it in edge-to-edge performance. :king:
 

Patudo

Well-known member
I've often thought that although Nikon unquestionably have the knowhow to produce the very finest of optical instruments, the mid to upper mid market (the current day Monarch 5/7 and HG) has historically been Nikon's sweet spot in terms of binoculars. This was more or less the area the famous A and E series porros competed in, and even today's EII is a step down from eg. the Habicht in terms of weatherproofing and build quality. Competition at the alpha end of the market is incredibly intense - there are fewer offerings than the sub-alpha class, but also fewer buyers - and the competition are not only excellent at marketing but also superb optical manufacturers in their own right. Nikon vs Leica/Swarovski/Zeiss alphas remind me somewhat about Lexus vs the top Euro supercar manufacturers - Toyota's people were capable of producing a car like the LFA which, without a shadow of doubt, is amazing, yet most folks, if push came to shove, would rather a Carrera GT, or probably a Zonda etc. With regard to the EDGs specifically, it strikes me that their strongest points (focus feel, baffling) probably don't make themselves as immediately apparent as edge performance (SV), field of view (SF), colour rendition (Noctivid). Having had the opportunity to try all of them, I can absolutely understand why those that prefer the EDG do, but, excellent performer though it is, it isn't mine - and, it would seem, not popular with enough folks for Nikon to continue competing in that sector of the market.

NB. if you're a Nikon fan or even interested in optics, there are a couple of web links featuring visits to Nikon factories in Hikari and Tochigi that are most interesting reading. It amazes me that even with such a degree of precision manufacturing and, no doubt, quality control, sample variation still exists.
 

dries1

Member
Nikon IMHO makes the best flat field optics and if they wanted to they could make the best in the world. I own over 100 binoculars including the SV 8.5X42, the Noctivid 8X42, UVHD 8X42, FL 8X42 and the EDG is my first choice. To me it is the best compromise regarding optics and build quality. Others miles may vary, and they do.

Andy W.
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
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