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Denmark in June, song of warblers (1 Viewer)

PeterHD

Well-known member
Hi, I am still trying to get hold of the warblers here in Denmark.
I have made 4 recordings of singing warblers, would anyone be able to help me ID them?

1) This one is recorded in the reeds at a lake called Gundsømagle. I think it is a Eurasian reed warbler (Acrocephalus scirpaceus) or a Sedge warbler (Acrocephalus schoenobaenus). I hope it is the latter but i am not sure...

2) + 3) was recorded on the edge of a nearby field in a bush. Could that be a Marsh warbler (Acrocephalus palustris)? (there are sounds from a number of different species on the recording, but I am mostly interested in the one tat is singing - not the one that is alerting near the place where I recorded)

4) + 5) was recorded from a bird sitting in the trees near the lake. I think it is a Willow warbler (Phylloscopus trochilus)?

6) is a small video recorded a little earlier this year at Amager near Copenhagen. The bird cannot be seen in the video but the song can be heard. Is that an Icterine warbler (Hippolais icterina)?

Find the files here: https://sites.google.com/site/lydopagelsesangere/sangere2015

Thanks a lot in advance.
Best regards, Peter
 

lou salomon

the birdonist
recordings 1,4,5 and 6 correct.
2 and 3 probably also right with marsh warbler but i can hardly hear the song. i'm a bit unsure about the warning sound which sounds more like a common whitethroat to me.
 

PeterHD

Well-known member
Hi Lou - thank you. Regarding 1), did you confirm it as a Eurasian reed warbler (Acrocephalus scirpaceus) or a Sedge warbler (Acrocephalus schoenobaenus)?
Best, Peter
 
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