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Difficulty Bonding with 8x32 EL (1 Viewer)

gwlee

Member
Spent the day hiking with the 8x32 EL in its element. Photo was taken from the Pacific Crest Trail at about 10, 000 feet looking South into the Emigrant Wilderness.


1622691103214.jpeg
 

gwlee

Member
Have you bonded, yet? It looks like you might have, from that beautiful view that you shared together with your El.
Yes and no. I bought the 8x32 EL primarily to replace my 8x42 while hiking and cycling near my mountain home, and it works well for those applications, which entail more carrying than looking.

I’d hoped, or perhaps incorrectly assumed, it could also replace my 8x42 for all purposes except astronomy, which is better served by my 50mm porro, but I am not sure that’s going to work out for me given it’s 4mm exit pupil, so I have decided to hang onto both the 8x42 and the 8x32 for a second year to see how it goes. Ideally, I want to own just two handheld binoculars, a 50mm for astronomy, and a smaller roof for everything else, but might decide to keep all three. I‘ve definitely learned something from this experiment.

I doubt a different 8x32 would work any better for me than the EL, but I will look for post pandemic opportunities to inspect other 32mm, 42mm, and 50mm binoculars that might make a better two-binocular solution for me while I continue working with my EL. For example, my 8x32 EL combined with a 10x50 EL, or my 10x50 porro combined with a 7x42 roof?
 

mwhogue

Well Known Member
Supporter
Yes and no. I bought the 8x32 EL primarily to replace my 8x42 while hiking and cycling near my mountain home, and it works well for those applications, which entail more carrying than looking.

I’d hoped, or perhaps incorrectly assumed, it could also replace my 8x42 for all purposes except astronomy, which is better served by my 50mm porro, but I am not sure that’s going to work out for me given it’s 4mm exit pupil, so I have decided to hang onto both the 8x42 and the 8x32 for a second year to see how it goes. Ideally, I want to own just two handheld binoculars, a 50mm for astronomy, and a smaller roof for everything else, but might decide to keep all three. I‘ve definitely learned something from this experiment.

I doubt a different 8x32 would work any better for me than the EL, but I will look for post pandemic opportunities to inspect other 32mm, 42mm, and 50mm binoculars that might make a better two-binocular solution for me while I continue working with my EL. For example, my 8x32 EL combined with a 10x50 EL, or my 10x50 porro combined with a 7x42 roof?

I enjoy the EL 8x32, Fujinon 10x50 and several 7x42 roofs. IMO the best two bin combination given your intended use would be the 10x50 porros with a 7x42 roof. That pair covers more ground so to speak.

Mike
 

gwlee

Member
I enjoy the EL 8x32, Fujinon 10x50 and several 7x42 roofs. IMO the best two bin combination given your intended use would be the 10x50 porros with a 7x42 roof. That pair covers more ground so to speak.

Mike
I also have a Fujinon 10x50 FMT-SX that I use for astronomy and long range terrestrial viewing, two applications that don’t need central focus. IF makes it unsuited to viewing birds and other wildlife that are often encountered near my home at various distances though.

Although I haven’t tried it yet, I assume a 10x50 EL would work well for all three of these applications that entail more looking than carrying, and I think my 8x32 EL, which I find better suited to long carries in steep mountains than long observing sessions, might be a good complement to a 10x50 EL. It‘s a two-binocular approach I want to carefully examine. I think Cabellas stocks the 10x50 EL, should it be easy to find one to examine.

As you suggest, a Leica 7x42, or something similar, might be a good, wide-range complement to my existing 10x50 FMT-SX. I enjoy the easy view that comes with low power binoculars with wide exit pupils like my previously unmentioned 7x50 FMT-SX, but don’t know whether the 7x42 has enough eye relief. If so, it might replace my 7x50 as well as my 8x42, which is going in the right direction. I doubt a 7x42 is light enough or compact enough to work appreciably better than my 8x42 for long carries in steep terrain, but it’s another two-binocular approach I want to carefully examine.

Have a feeling that by starting down the 7x42 path, I might end up owning the same three binoculars you own, but would own one less binocular (7x50), obtain a more contemporary 42mm design, and do it without giving up any functional capability. It‘s going to be tough to find a 7x42 Leica to examine though.
 

Maljunulo

Well-known member
If I may suggest, stop jumping around and stop the "more carrying than using" and just concentrate on actually using the 8X32 EL.

I too doubt if a different 8X32 would solve your perceived problem.

You could be overthinking the problem.
 

gwlee

Member
If I may suggest, stop jumping around and stop the "more carrying than using" and just concentrate on actually using the 8X32 EL.
When I find something that works well for me, I usually stick with until it stops working, or something obviously much better comes along. I have used the same 50mm porro binoculars for astronomy for about 50 years and used the same model of 8x42 binocular for everything else for the last 20 years, so I am not inclined to “jump around” much.

About a year ago, I began auditioning a more contemporary 8x32 as a possible replacement for my old 8x42 with mixed results. After starting this thread about a week ago, I have received some useful insights and good suggestions, and decided to continue working with this 8x32 for another year before deciding what to do with it, which I believe is more or less what you are suggesting, and what I am doing.

Like any binocular, it has both strengths and weaknesses that I continue to discuss because I find the discussion useful. While working with this 8x32 for the next year, I also plan to take advantage of opportunities to examine other binoculars for additional insight to help inform my decision.
 

Troubador

Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
When I find something that works well for me, I usually stick with until it stops working, or something obviously much better comes along. I have used the same 50mm porro binoculars for astronomy for about 50 years and used the same model of 8x42 binocular for everything else for the last 20 years, so I am not inclined to “jump around” much.

About a year ago, I began auditioning a more contemporary 8x32 as a possible replacement for my old 8x42 with mixed results. After starting this thread about a week ago, I have received some useful insights and good suggestions, and decided to continue working with this 8x32 for another year before deciding what to do with it, which I believe is more or less what you are suggesting, and what I am doing.

Like any binocular, it has both strengths and weaknesses that I continue to discuss because I find the discussion useful. While working with this 8x32 for the next year, I also plan to take advantage of opportunities to examine other binoculars for additional insight to help inform my decision.
gwlee, you might find it useful to take a look at this information about Eye Relief from Zeiss: 6. Eye relief

Lee
 

gwlee

Member
gwlee, you might find it useful to take a look at this information about Eye Relief from Zeiss: 6. Eye relief

Lee
Thank you. I never paid much attention to ER until I was forced to start using eyeglasses about 30 years ago. Within 10 years I was forced to replace all my binoculars to obtain sufficient ER to work well with my eyeglasses.

With the 8x32 EL, one click up from lowest eyecup position allows me to see the full field of view without blackouts, any lower produces blackouts, any higher prevents me from seeing the full field of view. For this binocular, ER seems to be more critical than others I own, so I plan to experiment with o-rings to see whether I can create an intermediate position that works a little better for me than the factory options. I also plan to order a smaller eyeglass frame with a single-vision prescription to see if that helps.
 

edwincjones

Well-known member
but it happens,
you get a good pair of binoculars well recommended by many people you respect,
but you just do not bond
like i barely remember from the long past - like a date

edj
 

Troubador

Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
Thank you. I never paid much attention to ER until I was forced to start using eyeglasses about 30 years ago. Within 10 years I was forced to replace all my binoculars to obtain sufficient ER to work well with my eyeglasses.

With the 8x32 EL, one click up from lowest eyecup position allows me to see the full field of view without blackouts, any lower produces blackouts, any higher prevents me from seeing the full field of view. For this binocular, ER seems to be more critical than others I own, so I plan to experiment with o-rings to see whether I can create an intermediate position that works a little better for me than the factory options. I also plan to order a smaller eyeglass frame with a single-vision prescription to see if that helps.
I wear spectacles too and have found o-rings a good solution. Do you mind me being a bit pedantic for a moment? Eye relief is an optical measurement taken from the top lens of the eyepiece. Eyecups do not take part in this process. Take the eyecups off the bino and the ER is still the same. So it is not the ER that is more 'critical' on these binos it is more a case of the eyecups perhaps not having positions that quite suit you and your spectacles, but there are things you can do. Firstly, remember the position of your spectacles on your nose will affect where your eyes end up in relation to the ER. If you get an eyecup position that is nearly perfect apart from the occasional 'blackout shadow' try moving your specs down your nose a fraction and don't press the binos too hard against your specs. And don't be too afraid to experiment with the position of the eyecups. I have one bino where the eyecups rest against the click-stop of the official position but I haven't rotated the eyecups to actually 'click' into it. Its perfect and the eyecups don't move when in use. Finally there is the o-ring option which has helped me out. I would try all of these out before considering getting different spectacles. Finally (and apologies if this all sounds like a lecture, it isn't meant to be) setting IPD really should be as simple as finding the place where the view is perfectly circular because the two images have merged. IPD does't alter the distance of your eyes from the the eyepiece so it doesn't take part in this adjustment.
Good luck with your adjustments.

Lee
 

gwlee

Member
I wear spectacles too and have found o-rings a good solution. Do you mind me being a bit pedantic for a moment? Eye relief is an optical measurement taken from the top lens of the eyepiece. Eyecups do not take part in this process. Take the eyecups off the bino and the ER is still the same. So it is not the ER that is more 'critical' on these binos it is more a case of the eyecups perhaps not having positions that quite suit you and your spectacles, but there are things you can do. Firstly, remember the position of your spectacles on your nose will affect where your eyes end up in relation to the ER. If you get an eyecup position that is nearly perfect apart from the occasional 'blackout shadow' try moving your specs down your nose a fraction and don't press the binos too hard against your specs. And don't be too afraid to experiment with the position of the eyecups. I have one bino where the eyecups rest against the click-stop of the official position but I haven't rotated the eyecups to actually 'click' into it. Its perfect and the eyecups don't move when in use. Finally there is the o-ring option which has helped me out. I would try all of these out before considering getting different spectacles. Finally (and apologies if this all sounds like a lecture, it isn't meant to be) setting IPD really should be as simple as finding the place where the view is perfectly circular because the two images have merged. IPD does't alter the distance of your eyes from the the eyepiece so it doesn't take part in this adjustment.
Good luck with your adjustments.

Lee
Thank you. I agree with what you have written here. These are essential techniques for dealing with a fiddly binocular, and spectacle use makes any binocular more fiddly. I also find that fiddliness (?) tends to increase as binocular size decreases and AFOV increases.

I am due for new spectacles anyway, so it’s an opportunity to optimize them as part of an observing system. The cost of new spectacles is about 1/10 the cost of a new premium binocular, so a binocular accommodation worth considering in any case.
 

abhiram

New member
United States
I also have a Fujinon 10x50 FMT-SX that I use for astronomy and long range terrestrial viewing, two applications that don’t need central focus. IF makes it unsuited to viewing birds and other wildlife that are often encountered near my home at various distances though.

Although I haven’t tried it yet, I assume a 10x50 EL would work well for all three of these applications that entail more looking than carrying, and I think my 8x32 EL, which I find better suited to long carries in steep mountains than long observing sessions, might be a good complement to a 10x50 EL. It‘s a two-binocular approach I want to carefully examine. I think Cabellas stocks the 10x50 EL, should it be easy to find one to examine.

As you suggest, a Leica 7x42, or something similar, might be a good, wide-range complement to my existing 10x50 FMT-SX. I enjoy the easy view that comes with low power binoculars with wide exit pupils like my previously unmentioned 7x50 FMT-SX, but don’t know whether the 7x42 has enough eye relief. If so, it might replace my 7x50 as well as my 8x42, which is going in the right direction. I doubt a 7x42 is light enough or compact enough to work appreciably better than my 8x42 for long carries in steep terrain, but it’s another two-binocular approach I want to carefully examine.

Have a feeling that by starting down the 7x42 path, I might end up owning the same three binoculars you own, but would own one less binocular (7x50), obtain a more contemporary 42mm design, and do it without giving up any functional capability. It‘s going to be tough to find a 7x42 Leica to examine though.
I found the UHD 7x42 to be fairly heavy, yet much more compact than most 42s. I am not sure if weight is the primary factor, but size-wise I found it very well suited for hikes and traveling. I could even fit it in a coat pocket. It has vivid, beautiful colors (quite frankly much better than the NL’s I have now) and if you can tolerate the weight, I would highly recommend them. If you are looking for a trial run, you could buy them on B&H or Adorama in particular and return if you do not like them - they are very lenient on their policies
 

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