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Do you get bored always using the same bin? (1 Viewer)

CliveP

Well-known member
Since I have a little collection I do find I swop what I use quite a lot as I sort of become desensitised to whatever I have been regularly using so it seems good to alternate.

There isn't one (of my ten or so different models) that I just always want to use and that's also been the case with bins I've owned previously.

I kind of wish that there was only one I wished to use all of the time but I don't think it will ever happen.

I think I do like at least three. A full size 42mm, a 30/32mm and something smaller like a 10x25 or 8x25/22 or even a 7x18 or a 6x16 monoc or ...............

You see, the list just grows :eek!:
 

mfunnell

Registered Confuser
I don't. I normally don't get bored when birding ;)
That's an interesting point - because I'm not at all sure that what I do is "birding" per se. I like taking photos of birds, and I like observing birds, but I'm not at all sure that amounts to "birding" as it's often discussed. I don't get bored with either activity (though actual "birding", at least as many describe it with species lists and such, doesn't interest me much) - but I do prefer to have the right set of bins to support whichever of those activities I engage in. I'm getting close to having the right set of kit to support both, with no annoyance from the binoculars, but still need a better 10x bin.

If "not being annoyed by" is the same as "being bored by" then my objective is to find binoculars that bore me enough! 8-P

...Mike
 

Troubador

Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
Its a good question Clive. I had a Dialyt 10x40 BGA for 17 years and an FL 8x42 for 9 years, as my only bins and never got bored of using them. In recent years I have expanded my stable of bins and I must say I do enjoy using them in different circumstances according to habitat, weather, target species and what other equipment I am carrying and plan to use.

Lee
 

edwincjones

Well-known member
bored..........no.........well maybe..........I don't know...............

I have about a dozen pair, both birding and astronomy;
and rotate them on an irregular basis based on impulse or viewing goals
adds variety to observing
I may get bored with observing, but not the optics

It has been a long time since I only had one.

edj
 
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Gilmore Girl

Beth
Supporter
United States
It's human nature to become bored of most things. We become bored of material things, our jobs, friends, lovers, etc. I become bored quickly and I've had many different interests, but bird watching and nature
study has stuck with me and I haven't been too bored by it. It's a part of my identity now I guess. I do have days
when I need a break here and there, but I never stop caring about conservation and the environment.

Right now I have this shoulder injury and I'm super bored on the weekends
resting it, but I was able to get out last weekend which caused a little setback with healing.
Boredom is a symptom of depression too and I have struggled with depression my whole life.
It's easy for me to become unmotivated and disinterested. I have to struggle against this constantly.

I have gotten rid of a couple of bins I wish I had back now and both are hard to find. One that I would like
to add back to my little collection is the Leupold Hawthorne 7x42, so if anyone has one they want to unload let me know ;) I was impulsive (am still am to a degree) and now know which bins I shouldn't get rid of.

The key is to find a binocular or two that's comfortable and meets our requirements for the activity. Once you get one that "fits" you very well then it will be the one you mostly grab when heading out even if you may be a little bored with it. Then you concentrate on the birds and wildlife forgetting about the tool because you know it will get the job done for you. Since I started wearing glasses my choices diminished. Now I mostly care about comfort with glasses, ergonomics and weight and then optical quality.
 

mayoayo

Well-known member
I only own one pair now,and I use it when im outdoors ,or interested in seeing something a bit closer..At that point ,of being interested in seeing something,all boredom has already vanished from my mood,crushed by curiosity ..So no,i dont get bored wit a pair of bins in my hands..
At times I had owned more than one pair..Two pairs was normal ,and three or even four at times..and same with scopes..Well..If i have them i use them,some are better than others for this or that use..some are smaller,some brighter..we all know...but i know im lucky having one pair of bins and and a scope,because other times i havent had any ,and it was hard..The harder part ,though,is to forget your bins at home in a well planned trip...i have done it and sucks..Its worst than boring..
This said I can say that I have settled in a quite decent 8x32 roof and a full size old fluorite scope,as ultimate allrounders...7x35 and a 50 mm scope would both be welcomed...
 

CliveP

Well-known member
This seems to be going well as a general discuss :t:

I get stir crazy if I don't get out of the house and I just like calm nature spots where I can listen as well as watch and just get into the zone so I've developed a dislike of joggers who tend to ruin the ambience as they puff and pant up behind you. I'm never as happy as when it's just me and the nature although I enjoy meeting any interesting people that I may encounter occasionally and I do like where I live for luscious greenery also.

I'm just back in as I had to shoot out on the spare of the moment this morning as rain and cloud may move in for a few days but it's still sunny so far so will get some drying done. It'll be frosty autumn mornings soon and they are nice.

Really enjoy cycling to my local spots also but somehow I never get bored with my old bike of 25 years. I bought a new one recently and it's just waiting to get some use. I guess I can add or update parts on the old bike and even adjusting it slightly i.e. the seat angle for instance, can make it feel renewed unlike my legs

I think I also like changing bins as each one shows me the same places in perhaps a slightly different way be it colour, fov, magnification or whatever.

I'm sure I will continue to be interested in this for my remaining days (and there will be further optics along the way). I always liked nature as a kid and it's just the same now only even better with some decent bins and a bike for that matter. Never had one of those until my teens and then my mother decided to buy me a pretty beautiful racing bike but this old one I have now I bought some years afterwards and I can't quite believe I still enjoy it so much.

I'm also getting into reading adventure books, currently Ranulph Feines book Cold as I thought this might help me cope with winters and I actually think it will. What he has gone through is pretty shocking and he seems to have been extremely fortunate to have lived to tell the tales but I suppose the keyword is he has 'lived'.
 
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edwincjones

Well-known member
A different binocular means seeing the same thing just a little different,
getting to know the subject just a little better.
 

[email protected]

Well-known member
Supporter
Yes, I get bored with binoculars the same way I get bored with woman. I change them as often as I change my socks.:smoke:
 
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Torview

Registered User
Supporter
Trick is to have something less good than your prime bin, that way you get reminded how good the prime one is and why you paid the extra for it originally, works a treat for me.
 

iveljay

Well-known member
At home I often change to a different bin that will suit what I am looking at - similarly I curse not carrying several to choose from frequently when away from base. As yet I have to find the perfect bin, guitar, camera etc. and probably never will. In life I have fought against being pigeon-holed, so will never be a birder or anything else, but I do attempt to be good at all my diverse interests.

Some if my non-prime bins have excellent qualities that the 'primes' do not have. Handling being one common example. I have lots of 8x bins. all with differering handling. As we are all different this should not be surprising. If one bin is enough for you then that is right for you and don't be talked into getting more than one just because some sad sucker like me does differently. Of course the reverse is also true...

At the end of the day you are doing this for you, so listen to the experts but follow your heart. Well it works for me...

J
 

CliveP

Well-known member
One of the bins I owned that I did like to use probably more than most was a Hawke 8x56 ED and then I sold it to some-one on here.

It was heavy, bulky and narrow fov so quite impractical but it had something of that feeling at times that you could just reach out and touch things and of course very nice in low light.

I remember taking my Leica HD and Hawke Sapphire out to test and afterward thinking the 8x56 would have beaten both. I suppose a good 7x42 probably has some similar effect in a smaller package?

I also had a bigger 10x58 ED Minox at one stage but it never had the same effect.
 

CliveP

Well-known member
Right now I have this shoulder injury and I'm super bored on the weekends
resting it, but I was able to get out last weekend which caused a little setback with healing.
Boredom is a symptom of depression too and I have struggled with depression my whole life.
It's easy for me to become unmotivated and disinterested. I have to struggle against this constantly.
The key is to find a binocular or two that's comfortable and meets our requirements for the activity. Once you get one that "fits" you very well then it will be the one you mostly grab when heading out even if you may be a little bored with it. Then you concentrate on the birds and wildlife forgetting about the tool because you know it will get the job done for you. Since I started wearing glasses my choices diminished. Now I mostly care about comfort with glasses, ergonomics and weight and then optical quality.


That convalescence "sucks" as I believe they say stateside.

I'm still recovering from nearly dying two years back after some kind of lung problem, they said pneumonitis so I don't really know what happened but I suspect some kind of fungus mould infection and my immune system seemed to be unable to clear it up and instead sort of went into overdrive and bunged up my lungs with mucus so I had great difficulty getting any air into my lungs and therefore oxygen into my blood. I think it was touch and go for a while but now it seems that I have some extra time again but am left with asthma which I never had before but it is well controlled with inhalers presently. The problem actually started about a year after I quit smoking but if I had not done that then I think I was heading for COPD or worse anyhow.

I wanted to say though that I had tried to read up something on mindfulness as it is touted as almost a miracle cure for depression and anxiety or whatever but I found the books to be full of nonsense exercises and basically talking a load of crap but I sort of got the idea and then one day I realised that birding or nature observation in general is actually practicing mindfulness and what a great way to do it and if you have some great bins then the effect is more dramatic I think.

So for me I get the physical fitness side with the cycling and walking and the mindfulness mediation side with the birding or general nature observation and the outdoors fresh air and the elements enjoyment.

I no longer bring a camera or scope as I need to travel lighter and my priority is observing, so bins are my main item and making sighting lists and so on is bureaucracy I don't wish for. Keeping it simple and changing my bin for a bit of a refreshing change.
 

Troubador

Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
So for me I get the physical fitness side with the cycling and walking and the mindfulness mediation side with the birding or general nature observation and the outdoors fresh air and the elements enjoyment.

I no longer bring a camera or scope as I need to travel lighter and my priority is observing, so bins are my main item and making sighting lists and so on is bureaucracy I don't wish for. Keeping it simple and changing my bin for a bit of a refreshing change.

Long may you continue to enjoy this and feel the full benefits of what the natural world offers.

Lee
 

CliveP

Well-known member
Long may you continue to enjoy this and feel the full benefits of what the natural world offers.

Lee

Yes thank you and likewise to all.

It will be interesting to see how things go. I don't like taking inhalers but I suppose it's easier than puffing on a cigarette 20 times a day. I can actually breath better going up hills when cycling now than I could when I was a smoker but I still find walking briskly a challenge for some reason but normally I don't so this while birding, more of a stalk style but I can run up stairs now while at the worst point I could only crawl up them if you can imagine that?

We never really know what is around the corner that is for sure and how suddenly a potentially life threatening illness can appear and progress but I didn't appreciate this as much before as I certainly do now. In a way it's made me try and look after my health more and appreciate nature while I'm here to see it but barring incidents I may have a couple of decades yet so no need to panic. I shouldn't have smoked for so long so I have only myself to blame for mistreating my system but am lucky and actually a bit surprised that I am so ok at present.

Positive mental attitude is a tough one though with so much crap around in this crazy world so birding is something of an escape from all of that.

This guy is very good https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GfTNV6kDAYg&index=1&list=PL7iYxOOL22RE1vCfiYc_xw_fbV4lv4il_
 
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Ratal

Well-known member
One bin, one scope.

That's all I need. Both are bright, sharp, give relaxed views and are super lightweight.
 

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