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ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

Do you have a great "viewing station" at home where you can relax with your bins and watch the wildlife? (1 Viewer)

ZDHart

Well-known member
Supporter
I use all of those since I can see for miles…..but I keep going back to 7x for its relaxing views and they remain steady even if it’s windy out.
Some may not think a 7x would be enjoyable with such expansive views that you have, so it's interesting to hear your view on that. I agree that the 7x (UVHD+ 7x42, in my case) provides a fantastic viewing experience.
 

Blue72

Well-known member
Some may not think a 7x would be enjoyable with such expansive views that you have, so it's interesting to hear your view on that. I agree that the 7x (UVHD+ 7x42, in my case) provides a fantastic viewing experience.

I learned a lot over the years. I always had 7x since my childhood. But when I moved here with miles and miles of shoreline to observe. The magnification bug hit me. I bought multiple binoculars and scopes up to 78x to see what worked best

First thing I learned is that you can have all the magnification in the world but atmospheric conditions and comfortable exit pupils really limits you to around 20-30x.….and regardless of magnification anything beyond 2 miles isn’t worth observing Unless it’s a very big object like a cargo ship.

the next thing I learned is that one eye spotting scope observing gives you a headache after while and puts to much strain on your body when observing for a long time. It was at this point that two eye views is the way to go while enjoying the coastline

since I also learned that two miles is the limit of observing. I have found 15/16x binoculars can scout that area well and a 20-30x scope was no longer necessary. This might be different for others who want more detail. But for me it worked.

After making the switch to two eyed viewing. I realized setting up a tripod, making numerous adjustments, and moving the tripod around was limiting my fun. I absolutely love the freedom of handholding my binoculars and is easier to keep up with any action that might be going on

I can handhold 12x pretty well. But eventually the shakes would settle in, making observing uncomfortable, 10x was better but not much. 8x are wonderful and if you never experienced 7x you would think they are the best handholding binoculars. But since I have 7x. Every time I use them, I never get tired of looking through them and I always feel RELAXED. …..Relaxed is the key word, I want a relaxed experience to wind down from a full days work. So I tend to grab 7x more then any other magnification. When I want to see more detail, I grab the others, but I never feel satisfied with the larger magnification due to the shakes. So once again, I go back to 7x and feel like I’m missing nothing

7x might limit my view to a mile or so, but that’s ok. I rather have the better overall experience. Plus astronomers know shakes kill details. So sometimes you can see more with 7x

Like Ferrari always said when someone said another car was faster. Ferrari would respond “Ferrari’s are not about the numbers”
 
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Maljunulo

Well-known member
First thing I learned is that you can have all the magnification in the world but atmospheric conditions and comfortable exit pupils really limits you to around 20-30x.….and regardless of magnification anything beyond 2 miles isn’t worth observing Unless it’s a very big object like a cargo ship.

the next thing I learned is that one eye spotting scope observing gives you a headache after while and puts to much strain on your body when observing for a long time. It was at this point that two eye views is the way to go while enjoying the coastline

since I also learned that two miles is the limit of observing. I have found 15/16x binoculars can scout that area well and a 20-30x scope was no longer necessary. This might be different for others who want more detail. But for me it worked.

After making the switch to two eyed viewing. I realized setting up a tripod, making numerous adjustments, and moving the tripod around was limiting my fun. I absolutely love the freedom of handholding my binoculars and is easier to keep up with any action that might be going on

I can handhold 12x pretty well. But eventually the shakes would settle in, making observing uncomfortable, 10x was better but not much. 8x are wonderful and if you never experienced 7x you would think they are the best handholding binoculars. But since I have 7x. Every time I use them, I never get tired of looking through them and I always feel RELAXED. …..Relaxed is the key word, I want a relaxed experience to wind down from a full days work. So I tend to grab 7x more then any other magnification. When I want to see more detail, I grab the others, but I never feel satisfied with the larger magnification due to the shakes. So once again, I go back to 7x and feel like I’m missing nothing

7x might limit my view to a mile or so, but that’s ok. I rather have the better overall experience. Plus astronomers know shakes kill details. So sometimes you can see more with 7x

Like Ferrari always said when someone said another car was faster. Ferrari would respond “Their cars are not about the numbers”
This is one of the best posts I have ever read here.

My 8X binoculars will clearly show atmospheric turbulence, which renders a precise focus impossible.
 

ZDHart

Well-known member
Supporter
I learned a lot over the years. I always had 7x since my childhood. But when I moved here with miles and miles of shoreline to observe. The magnification bug hit me. I bought multiple binoculars and scopes up to 78x to see what worked best

First thing I learned is that you can have all the magnification in the world but atmospheric conditions and comfortable exit pupils really limits you to around 20-30x.….and regardless of magnification anything beyond 2 miles isn’t worth observing Unless it’s a very big object like a cargo ship.

the next thing I learned is that one eye spotting scope observing gives you a headache after while and puts to much strain on your body when observing for a long time. It was at this point that two eye views is the way to go while enjoying the coastline

since I also learned that two miles is the limit of observing. I have found 15/16x binoculars can scout that area well and a 20-30x scope was no longer necessary. This might be different for others who want more detail. But for me it worked.

After making the switch to two eyed viewing. I realized setting up a tripod, making numerous adjustments, and moving the tripod around was limiting my fun. I absolutely love the freedom of handholding my binoculars and is easier to keep up with any action that might be going on

I can handhold 12x pretty well. But eventually the shakes would settle in, making observing uncomfortable, 10x was better but not much. 8x are wonderful and if you never experienced 7x you would think they are the best handholding binoculars. But since I have 7x. Every time I use them, I never get tired of looking through them and I always feel RELAXED. …..Relaxed is the key word, I want a relaxed experience to wind down from a full days work. So I tend to grab 7x more then any other magnification. When I want to see more detail, I grab the others, but I never feel satisfied with the larger magnification due to the shakes. So once again, I go back to 7x and feel like I’m missing nothing

7x might limit my view to a mile or so, but that’s ok. I rather have the better overall experience. Plus astronomers know shakes kill details. So sometimes you can see more with 7x

Like Ferrari always said when someone said another car was faster. Ferrari would respond “Ferrari’s are not about the numbers”
Indeed... it's easy to think that more magnification is always better. For me, it isn't, always.

I certainly love my 10x42 Victory SFs, for some things. But 10x is the most magnification that I desire. (Hand holding).

At my frequently used close-viewing distances (up to 150') I often find 7x preferable for general enjoying of what's going on around me. 7x is a fairly significant degree of magnification, though it may not sound all that impressive, "spec-wise" as compared to 10x.

I don't always want the most-magnified, highly-detailed image possible. I do on occasion, but not all the time.

Often, I prefer a nicely magnified view (7x) with very delicious "picture" quality:

-sparkly bright
-very snappy contrast
-rich, vibrant colors
-very slight warmth of color temperature
-deep depth-of-focus
-wide field-of-view
-razor-sharpness

The Leica UVHD+ 7x42s I recently bought provide exactly this viewing experience, and they have taught me this lesson about binoculars.
 
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SUPPRESSOR

Well-known member
England
I learned a lot over the years. I always had 7x since my childhood. But when I moved here with miles and miles of shoreline to observe. The magnification bug hit me. I bought multiple binoculars and scopes up to 78x to see what worked best

First thing I learned is that you can have all the magnification in the world but atmospheric conditions and comfortable exit pupils really limits you to around 20-30x.….and regardless of magnification anything beyond 2 miles isn’t worth observing Unless it’s a very big object like a cargo ship.

the next thing I learned is that one eye spotting scope observing gives you a headache after while and puts to much strain on your body when observing for a long time. It was at this point that two eye views is the way to go while enjoying the coastline

since I also learned that two miles is the limit of observing. I have found 15/16x binoculars can scout that area well and a 20-30x scope was no longer necessary. This might be different for others who want more detail. But for me it worked.

After making the switch to two eyed viewing. I realized setting up a tripod, making numerous adjustments, and moving the tripod around was limiting my fun. I absolutely love the freedom of handholding my binoculars and is easier to keep up with any action that might be going on

I can handhold 12x pretty well. But eventually the shakes would settle in, making observing uncomfortable, 10x was better but not much. 8x are wonderful and if you never experienced 7x you would think they are the best handholding binoculars. But since I have 7x. Every time I use them, I never get tired of looking through them and I always feel RELAXED. …..Relaxed is the key word, I want a relaxed experience to wind down from a full days work. So I tend to grab 7x more then any other magnification. When I want to see more detail, I grab the others, but I never feel satisfied with the larger magnification due to the shakes. So once again, I go back to 7x and feel like I’m missing nothing

7x might limit my view to a mile or so, but that’s ok. I rather have the better overall experience. Plus astronomers know shakes kill details. So sometimes you can see more with 7x

Like Ferrari always said when someone said another car was faster. Ferrari would respond “Ferrari’s are not about the numbers”
Wise words indeed.
 

ZDHart

Well-known member
Supporter
Where I bird. Not out back window, but not too far. Richmond Bay Trail, salt marsh and open bay. Last pic is Golden Gate bridge. Japan is just behind... Maybe folks can see why 10X??


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Nice, Tom!

And yes, I can certainly see that is 10x territory, indeed. Probably 12x territory if stability isn't difficult!

To see Japan, I'm pretty sure you'll want to bump up to at least 15x! o_O
 

GrampaTom

Well-known member
United States
Don, as we've chatted, I've spent time in AZ, have very fond memories of what to me is a rather exotic place. I truly dig your photos and the AZ critters, you captured so well. (you do need a rattlesnake though). Im no photographer. My photos do not compare to yours. Still, looking at my own, Im reminded why this place makes me smile, what the Bay and marsh looks like filled with waterfowl during migration, and am looking forward to October.
 
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ZDHart

Well-known member
Supporter
Don, as we've chatted, I've spent time in AZ, have very fond memories of what to me is a rather exotic place. I truly dig your photos and the AZ critters, you captured so well. (you do need a rattlesnake though). Im no photographer. My photos do not compare to yours. Still, looking at my own, Im reminded why this place makes me smile, what the Bay and marsh looks like filled with waterfowl during migration, and am looking forward to October.
Tom... California is a magical place and offers some of the most wonderful geography anyone could ask for. I enjoyed growing up there and living there for over four decades. These days, aside from the amazing geography, I don't miss what's going on there.

I'm very glad that you have some wonderful birding out your windows at home... and when out along the bay! Don't forget to pop by Muir Woods and the Redwoods, from time to time! I'm glad to know that you're plenty mobile to enjoy the sights and sounds, in many different places. The Pacific Northwest offers amazing beauty, as well.

Cheers, buddy!
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

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