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Do you use objective covers? (1 Viewer)

etudiant

Registered User
Supporter
The Canon 10x42ISL's built in objective cover glass protects the sensitive optics and the IS mechanism, but it also has threaded objective tubes.
Screwing on lens hoods further reduces stray light and allows protected viewing even in rain and snow.
I don't understand why that is not standard practice.
 

mwhogue

Well Known Member
In some cases it depends on how well the objective covers work. Otherwise, I don't always use them in the field. I always use them for storage and transportation. I always use them on the beach.

This and some of our other "either or" discussions on BF bring to mind an old saying which is much more beautiful in the original Spanish:

"Never say 'From this well, I will never drink.'"

Mike
 

chill6x6

Well-known member
I'll add years ago I used objective covers most of the time. They come off during use and you never know it. The Swarovski FP objective covers are especially vulnerable to coming off or tearing at point of attachment. I've also had objective covers flip back to cover the objective during use. When you go to spots frequented by other birders, you'll find objective covers along the way. Sometimes your own!
 

ReinierBos

Well-known member
Netherlands
Does anyone use a bino guard like this?
1674642389366.png

I don't know. When it is raining I do not go birding. Maybe it is more applicable for hunters. But still, it could be handy, because you can't always know when it is going to rain.
 

Will K

Too well-known member
United Kingdom
Does anyone use a bino guard like this?
View attachment 1490845

I don't know. When it is raining I do not go birding. Maybe it is more applicable for hunters. But still, it could be handy, because you can't always know when it is going to rain.
No, but I've thought about it. But it looks like it might really get in the way when lifting binos up to your eyes to view. Is is supposed to fall behind the binos, or clip-off to the side, I wonder?
 

crinklystarfish

Well-known member
Ireland
I briefly tried one and it was awful. It spent most of its time jammed uncomfortably between the strap and my chin / mouth / neck.

I do sometimes use objective covers but only if I have an uncased binocular on the seat of my car or in my bike's rack pack and similar.

FWIW, when I'm in the field with bins round my neck, I also have a habit of shielding my uncovered objective lenses if faced with swirling dust etc, or if bashing through vegetation etc.

You can buy used from me with confidence. ;)
 

A2GG

Beth
United States
I stopped using the objective lens caps several years ago. I never find a need to attach them to the bino anymore.
They're put away in the original box.

I always keep the rain guard on when the bino is in its case and put the rain guard in my pocket when out if it looks like it could rain.
 

Maljunulo

Well-known member
At the risk of being indelicate, for me the “rain guard” is more of a spit guard, since I do not go birding in the pouring rain.

I do, however, converse while wearing my binocular around my neck. The “rain guard” minimizes the number of times I have to clean my ocular lenses.
 

soloflyfisher

Active member
My (Leica) binoculars are old enough not to have objective covers, but I always bring a soft case into the field with me so I can protect the objective lenses as soon as I'm not actively using the binoculars.
 

Troubador

Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
At the risk of being indelicate, for me the “rain guard” is more of a spit guard, since I do not go birding in the pouring rain.

I do, however, converse while wearing my binocular around my neck. The “rain guard” minimizes the number of times I have to clean my ocular lenses.
In the west of Scotland it is perfectly possible to step out in the morning under a clear blue sky and blazing sunshine and then, before lunchtime, have dark clouds and pouring rain arrive. When this happens we don't run back to our rental cottage or even spit at our binos :) .
 

MiddleRiver

Well-known member
United States
In the west of Scotland it is perfectly possible to step out in the morning under a clear blue sky and blazing sunshine and then, before lunchtime, have dark clouds and pouring rain arrive. When this happens we don't run back to our rental cottage or even spit at our binos :) .
I learned to spit in my facemask to prevent fogging in cold water. Assumed Pure users with fogging issues would do the same? :cool:
 

mwhogue

Well Known Member
Please post it in Spanish, if you would.



Nunca digas "de este agua no beberé"
Water, instead of well (my version)


Thank you Tote. Majjunulo, having last taken Spanish in 1973 and never having the discipline to "keep it up"over the decades, I was going to have to resort to Google translate. Good advice in any language. Again, somehow more impactful in Spanish.

Mike
 

Rg548

Retired Somewhere
United Kingdom
Always... without fail, indoors and outdoors, in the car.... everywhere....
The Primary part of a bino, (or camera lens) is the glass, and its' coatings, why would you 'risk' damage, dust or dirt that isn't necessary.
My Meopta objective caps were a joke, so I replaced them with Vortex ones, flip down style. I bought some on day 1 for my CL 8x25's.
Same for my Leica BN's.
I've never found it a problem flicking them down, and will leave them down, if appropriate.

They are an insurance policy, and if anyone here says they wouldn't be right royally p###ed off if they damaged their NL Pure, Noctovid, EL lenses etc, with a scratch, however small, they are either rich enough not to care or lying!!
Perhaps a real cheap pair of bins wouldn't matter... but most of us here own expensive gear.

And just look at Dorubird's photos..... those lenses look amazing.... gotta love a bit of glass (without scratches)(y)
 

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