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Does anyone mark their diopter setting (1 Viewer)

42za

Well-known member
The FOCUS always changes with distance to the target. However, if the observer sets the diopter adjustment when RELAXED (having learned to stare) that setting should remain the same throughout the observing session. The diopter setting is to compensate for the DIFFERENCE in the dioptric strength of your eyes and need not be fiddled with as that difference should remain the same whether your target is 50 feet or 5,000 yards away. :cat:

Bill

Hello Bill,

Of course I agree fully with you.

The diopter settings are indeed needed to compensate for the differences between right and left eyes , and once properly set SHOULD remain constant for that particular person for any particular viewing session.
But eyes get tired and sometimes one eye will tire more than the other depending on any particular viewing condition , I know that mine do.

But I agree , once set up properly the diopter settings should not change for any particular person.

But I still think that marking a binocular is not necessary.

I have indeed expressed myself very badly on this one.

|:D| |:D|

Cheers.
 

WJC

Well-known member
I have indeed expressed myself very badly on this one.

|:D| |:D|

Cheers.

Get over it!

While trying to express myself correctly and take several known, popular misgivings into account at the same time, I often express myself incorrectly. It’s hard to please everyone when their understanding, intellect, experience, and agendas are all over the map. :cat:

Cheers,

Bill
 

yarrellii

Well-known member
Supporter
Not exactly an answer to the OP, but slightly related, in the sense of "marking" something for a later use: one thing I like about classic binoculars is that they have a scale for the IPD, so that you can set them right for you, whether is after taking them out of their case or (more often), after having shared them with someone else for a quick look. This happens on a daily basis to me when I'm sharing observations, and with classic binoculars it's just a breeze, I don't even need to look through the binoculars, just set them before raising them to my face and bang. With more contemporary devices I have to readjust them, which is really not a lot of time or hassle, but it's a small inconvenience that is simply spared if the binoculars have an indexed scale :)
 
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