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Does Canon Advertise or Promote IS to Birders? (1 Viewer)

AlanFrench

Well-known member
Some years ago I subscribed to a couple of birding magazines. I do not remember any Canon ads for their IS binoculars, although there were certainly plenty of ads for other brands.

Does Canon actively advertise to birders and promote their line at birding events?

Thanks, and clear skies, Alan
 

Mono

Hi!
Staff member
Supporter
Europe
TVs Chris Packham is always seen using Canon IS, when BBC presenter guidelines permit.
Chris-Packham-_M9A0846-2-copy-2-1-scaled.jpg
 

fazalmajid

Well-known member
Supporter
United States
I just checked my latest RSPB Nature's Home and there are manufacturer ads for:
  • Nikon Monarch M7 and M5
  • Zeiss SF32
  • Swarovski NL
  • Hawke Frontier
Nothing from Canon. Their IS doesn't handle panning very well (at least on my 10x42L IS), so it's best for static views, not birds in flight.

They do have a presence at Birdfair, but reading between the lines, it looks like they emphasize cameras and printers more than binoculars, that are paid lip service to. I have not yet been to Birdfair, so take this with a grain of salt.
 

etudiant

Registered User
Supporter
I just checked my latest RSPB Nature's Home and there are manufacturer ads for:
  • Nikon Monarch M7 and M5
  • Zeiss SF32
  • Swarovski NL
  • Hawke Frontier
Nothing from Canon. Their IS doesn't handle panning very well (at least on my 10x42L IS), so it's best for static views, not birds in flight.

They do have a presence at Birdfair, but reading between the lines, it looks like they emphasize cameras and printers more than binoculars, that are paid lip service to. I have not yet been to Birdfair, so take this with a grain of salt.
No clue on why Canon keeps its excellent IS binoculars under wraps, my guess is that it is a very peripheral business that has no clout in the hierarchy.
Was surprised that panning with your 10x42 ISL does not work for you, I find it very effective for flying birds, raptors, waterfowl etc.
 

wllmspd

Well-known member
Never see any ads, only once met anyone in the field with a pair (18x heavyweights). My 12x continue to be my “take only one optic” as the IS allows you to see more detail for the magnification. Look after them and they’ll do you good service.

Peter
 

AlanFrench

Well-known member
Thanks for the responses.

For years Canon Professional Services has been bringing their cameras to the annual Northeast Astronomy Forum in Suffern, NY, USA. In 2018 they got so many people asking "Why not the IS binoculars?" that one of the reps made sure they had some in 2019. They didn't have the entire line, but had most of them, and promised to have them all in 2020. Because of the pandemic, NEAF was not held in 2020. We'll see what Canon has on hand in 2022.

I've had some friends buy a pair of Canon IS, generally the 10x30 or 12x36, after seeing my 12x36 IIs. I find it odd that Canon doesn't get these "out and about" among birders and amateur astronomers - although amateur astronomers are generally aware of them and the 10x42L, 15x50, and 18x50 are their typical choices. The IS certainly makes a good impression on most people.

Clear skies, Alan
 
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CSG

Well-known member
United States
I've had my 10x30 IS for years but I bought them more for astronomy than anything else. The IS function is superb but the optics are middling. I almost never think of them for birding but I don't consider myself a birder, more a general user.
 

AlanFrench

Well-known member
I've had my 10x30 IS for years but I bought them more for astronomy than anything else. The IS function is superb but the optics are middling. I almost never think of them for birding but I don't consider myself a birder, more a general user.
When my wife bought me a pair of 12x36 II IS, about 20 years ago, my birding binocular was a Swarovski 7x42 SLC. Better optics, but the larger image scale and a steady view at 12x revealed more detail and allowed for easier IDs. The difference between "There were some kinglets out in the wood-line" and "There are some Ruby-crowned Kinglets and one Golden-crowned Kinglet in the edge of the woods."

As I've gotten older IS has become increasingly helpful - I can't imagine trying to hand-hold even 7x binoculars.

My 7x42s are quite neglected, although I kept them for their 8-degree true field, which can be enjoyable exploring dark night skies, and is often helpful at providing context for celestial objects. I can hold them reasonably steady reclining in a zero-gravity chair, and they also have a nice tripod adapter.

Clear skies, Alan
 

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