• BirdForum is the net's largest birding community dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE!

    Register for an account to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

Dragonfly ID Pointers (1 Viewer)

stevo

Well-known member
This is a brilliant thread,please keep the photo`s & ID pointers coming as a newcomer like me is finding some Odonata`s bewildering!!!!

Cheers Steve.
 

puffinboy

Active member
Migrant & Southern Hawker Compared

Further to previous posts - here is a direct comparison of a Migrant Hawker (left) and a Southern Hawker (right)

Migrants are a little smaller and appear gray/blue at a distance and note the almost non-existant antehumeral stripes - also often seen in large numbers

Southerns are more robust and are more green/blue at a distance with the green broad antehumeral stripes very visible

Took the Migrant Hawker photo today after having several frustrating previous outings waiting for them to land :(

On this occasion not only did one land right in front of me but then another joined it...!!

Cheers Tom, East Sussex, UK
 

Attachments

  • migrant-southern-hawker2.jpg
    migrant-southern-hawker2.jpg
    107.8 KB · Views: 688

Adey Baker

Member
Immature male Darters can look very similar in colour to females.

Below shows the difference in 'Anal appendages', in this case, of Common Darters, between the two sexes which should help
 

Attachments

  • comdartdiff.jpg
    comdartdiff.jpg
    42.6 KB · Views: 565

Adey Baker

Member
Here's a very mature female Common Darter showing some red colouring on the abdomen - the wings can also be coloured slightly but the leaf in the background is masking that somewhat!
 

Attachments

  • mature-fem-com-dart-aug-23-.jpg
    mature-fem-com-dart-aug-23-.jpg
    45.3 KB · Views: 538

Hauer

Well-known member
Hi - Just thought I would share some info with you too..... I placed a forum article some time ago on Steve's DigiCams website regarding my personal experience with reverse lens photography. I thought, I would share as much info as possible from my side as there appears to be much interest in respect of this technique and experienced first-hand that it is not always easy to obtain all required components.

Here is the link: http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/view_topic.php?id=59210&forum_id=50

Do note that the various pictures are not displayed unless you login / register. The website links that I have mentioned offer besides inspiration, a vast amount of info on techniques in respect of insect photography.

Hope its of use. Thanks to you all for sharing the above wonderful info / photos!

Cheers - Herman Auer
 

Surreybirder

Ken Noble
puffinboy said:
Further to previous posts - here is a direct comparison of a Migrant Hawker (left) and a Southern Hawker (right)

Migrants are a little smaller and appear gray/blue at a distance and note the almost non-existant antehumeral stripes - also often seen in large numbers

Southerns are more robust and are more green/blue at a distance with the green broad antehumeral stripes very visible

Took the Migrant Hawker photo today after having several frustrating previous outings waiting for them to land :(

On this occasion not only did one land right in front of me but then another joined it...!!

Cheers Tom, East Sussex, UK

Has anyone got a pic of Common hawker to show the long thin antehumeral stripes? I've never seen the species locally but Southern and Migrant are both common.
Ken
 

Attachments

  • southern_hawker2.jpg
    southern_hawker2.jpg
    148 KB · Views: 513
  • pres-migrant_hawker.jpg
    pres-migrant_hawker.jpg
    22.2 KB · Views: 502

Ashton.P

Well-known member
Hi Ken,

Photo attached showing the thin antehumeral stripes and yellow costa (edge of wing) of a male Common Hawker, also second picture of female showing minimal antehumeral but still obvious yellow costa.

Regards,
Paul.
East Riding Dragonflies
 

Attachments

  • commonhawker3.jpg
    commonhawker3.jpg
    42.1 KB · Views: 537
  • comhawf3.jpg
    comhawf3.jpg
    33.5 KB · Views: 538

psilo

Well-known member
As Adey was kind enough to give me a positive id I thought that I would add my black darter (Sympetrum danae) photos here. These are quite a bit smaller than the common darter and when they fly they have the most beautiful blue wings. Being very dark though I found them very difficult to photograph. The literature says that they are common and widespread on lowlands and heaths and that it is rare on uplands. However these were found on a pond up on the moors which are quite high indeed.
 

Attachments

  • Black-darterbf.jpg
    Black-darterbf.jpg
    192.9 KB · Views: 475
  • blackdarter2-copy.jpg
    blackdarter2-copy.jpg
    196.3 KB · Views: 457
  • blackdarter3 copy.jpg
    blackdarter3 copy.jpg
    82.4 KB · Views: 423

harry eales

Ancient Entomologist
psilo said:
As Adey was kind enough to give me a positive id I thought that I would add my black darter (Sympetrum danae) photos here. These are quite a bit smaller than the common darter and when they fly they have the most beautiful blue wings. Being very dark though I found them very difficult to photograph. The literature says that they are common and widespread on lowlands and heaths and that it is rare on uplands. However these were found on a pond up on the moors which are quite high indeed.

Hello psilo,
I'm afraid the literature about Black Darter being an acidic pool loving species in either upland or lowland heaths is now quite incorrect.

It may have been true some ten years ago, but in the Northern counties of England it has expanded out of it's predominantly acidic water upland habitat and can now even be found in coastal low lying ponds many miles from any bogs or mire. It has even turned up as a breeding species in ponds on Magnesium Limestone which is about as none-acidic as you can get.

Harry
 

Surreybirder

Ken Noble
The male demoiselles are easy to tell apart (I'm talking in a UK context here) but the females are not always easy in isolation. The female beautiful has a 'dipped in tea' look. I'll try and show the differences:
 

Attachments

  • beautiful_demoiselle_female.jpg
    beautiful_demoiselle_female.jpg
    35.3 KB · Views: 475
  • beautiful_demoiselle_immmale.jpg
    beautiful_demoiselle_immmale.jpg
    30.8 KB · Views: 450
  • banded_demoiselle_female.jpg
    banded_demoiselle_female.jpg
    30.8 KB · Views: 449
  • banded_demoiselle7.jpg
    banded_demoiselle7.jpg
    32.1 KB · Views: 433
  • beautiful_demoiselle.jpg
    beautiful_demoiselle.jpg
    37.9 KB · Views: 452

BugMan

Member
Immature or Female Blue Coporal

This is the coloring of a Blue Corporal Dragonfly immature male or female. Since it was found around May it may likely be a male. The adults are .. well "blue" *wink*
 

Attachments

  • bluecorporal008.jpg
    bluecorporal008.jpg
    85.9 KB · Views: 437

Sue Wright

Well-known member
What a brilliant thread! I was delighted to see so much about them all as I find them all a little complicating to ID at times, to say the least, even with a good book.

I even put a Large Red Damsel (wrongly now I know) on the Butterfly & Moths thread on Friday.

This is all making for fascinating learning. Thank you all.

Sue
 

digitalbirdy

Well-known member
Chaser or Skimmer !

This Dragonfly I photographed yesterday in Devon (UK), has Brown eyes but a blue back - so which is it, a Chaser or a Skimmer.

Please excuse me posting it in this thread, but as the photo came out quite well, I thought it could be useful for others regarding ID.

Adrian
 

Attachments

  • dragonfly_15jun06_1117crp1_t450.jpg
    dragonfly_15jun06_1117crp1_t450.jpg
    66.7 KB · Views: 469

Adey Baker

Member
Blue-tailed Damselflies are very common over much of the UK (only really confusable with Scarce Blue-tail - which I don't have any photos of for comparison!) but they come in a bewildering variety of colours.

Hopefully, I've got all the commonest forms labelled correctly below:

Pic 1: Males, immature on the left showing the bright green colour of the abdomen which turns through a blue/green turquoise colour into the blue male. Note the two-toned pterostigma.

Females are more variable, either called just A, B and C-types or various scientific names.

Pic 2: is a near-adult 'andromorph'-type female with colouring similar to the male with the inset showing the differences between the male and female appendages.

Pic 3: shows the two regular colours of immature females, the more or less self-explanatory violacea purple-coloured on the left and the pinkish rufescens on the right. Both show the whitish pterostigma and blue segment 8.

Pic 4: shows adult females which have now lost the blue 'tail' - the greenish form of infuscans on the left and rufescens-obsoleta on the right which, together with its immature rufescens form lacks the black line on the thorax.

Anybody got any Scarce Blue-tail photos to put on here?
 

Attachments

  • bt-male-imm-ad-1.jpg
    bt-male-imm-ad-1.jpg
    64.9 KB · Views: 405
  • bt-fem-and-1.jpg
    bt-fem-and-1.jpg
    72.8 KB · Views: 402
  • bt-fem-imm-1.jpg
    bt-fem-imm-1.jpg
    61.2 KB · Views: 387
  • bt-fem-ad-1.jpg
    bt-fem-ad-1.jpg
    64.6 KB · Views: 425

Stranger

Well-known member
stevo said:
This is a brilliant thread,please keep the photo`s & ID pointers coming as a newcomer like me is finding some Odonata`s bewildering!!!!

Cheers Steve.

I`ll second that, (both the brilliant and the bewildering).
 

brianfm

Botanical Birder
Brilliant stuff. I am a newcomer to all of this, but I am going to work through the thread slowly. Hope it keeps going.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top