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ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

duck, Blakeney (1 Viewer)

marnixR

WYSIWYG
Supporter
not sure about this one, since i saw it at the Blakeney Conservation duck pond, so chances are that this is a captive bird, in which case i shouldn't really post it here
still, i can't place it amongst the run-of-the-mill UK ducks, and on the off-chance that it is an interloper from further away i thought i'd ask for people's opinion
pictures taken about a week ago

please ignore if it turns out to be a captive bird after all
 

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marnixR

WYSIWYG
Supporter
thanks - so obviously a captive, it's not very likely that it would have got to Norfolk under its own steam
 

Andy Hurley

All nations have the right to govern themselves
Opus Editor
Supporter
Scotland
These places are very useful as a live 3D experience of exotic ducks. Especially if you are about to travel to where some of them live naturally. If you are not able to travel, you see them in all there glory. They are all part of biology and if they escape, which is doubtful as they are fed regularly, what are the chances of survival? A little spot of exotic colour attracts visitors, which can be good for a local economy. If people went there to get a tick, their list, their rules, that's fine. Are places that feed the migrating Common Cranes or White storks in Germany any worse than the Blakeney Conservation duck pond? Garden feeders provide food for escapes and exotics too. Exotics come up regularly on this forum. Maybe some of us could be slightly less purist in their comments about them?
 

rosbifs

Well-known tool
France
These places are very useful as a live 3D experience of exotic ducks. Especially if you are about to travel to where some of them live naturally. If you are not able to travel, you see them in all there glory. They are all part of biology and if they escape, which is doubtful as they are fed regularly, what are the chances of survival? A little spot of exotic colour attracts visitors, which can be good for a local economy. If people went there to get a tick, their list, their rules, that's fine. Are places that feed the migrating Common Cranes or White storks in Germany any worse than the Blakeney Conservation duck pond? Garden feeders provide food for escapes and exotics too. Exotics come up regularly on this forum. Maybe some of us could be slightly less purist in their comments about them?
It was a joke and a typical comment of Mr Bishop - even funnier if said with his Norfolk accent… read it as such

One of the ‘greats’ in the history of Norfolk birdwatching - read about him too
 

Andy Hurley

All nations have the right to govern themselves
Opus Editor
Supporter
Scotland
It was a joke and a typical comment of Mr Bishop - even funnier if said with his Norfolk accent… read it as such

One of the ‘greats’ in the history of Norfolk birdwatching - read about him too
Knowing that is a joke from some bloke I have never heard of, doesn't make it funny to me! Thats life though.
 

Joern Lehmhus

Well-known member
If this is the same as the Blakeney collection Dave Appleton refers to on


they really had several hybrids at that place...
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia

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