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Duck ID, Ontario CANADA. (1 Viewer)

Tom Lusk

Well-known member
Here's about as bad a photo as I've ever taken- distance was likely 800+/- yards.

The rapid steady wing flap caught my eye as well as the colour - sort of a cinnamon teal.

ID?
 

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Thanks for your reply.

I believe Cinnamon Teal are rare in this area, St. Lwarence River, but would need to confirm.

Should the upper wing marking be much wider?
 
I would think that the pale blue upper wing coverts of a Cinnamon Teal should be visible from this angle, the bill looks on the small side as well. Cinnamon Teal would be extremely rare in Ontario. There was one near Cornwall in 1999. There have been a few others, mainly around Lake Ontario.

I'm thinking it looks better for Green-winged Teal. Maybe the color was influenced by the lighting. Was it taken early in the morning, or late in the evening? Or your white-balance was off?
 
Any reason why its not a female Mallard?


Well, depending which device I use to view the photo, the belly looks rather reddish, and uniformly dark. The bill seems uniformly dark as well, not saddled. Neither of those are definitive keys to ID even if accurate, but it's not surprising if people are looking at non-mallard ideas. Still, you've got a point: IDing this photo as a teal requires at least as much ignoring of detail as IDing it as a mallard.

And there's one little detail I just noticed. Right where the foot should be, there's a change in color. It looks to me that the foot is rather orange. That points strongly away from teal and towards mallard.

There is at least one other possibility, though. How about an immature male Northern Shoveler?
 
Don't see this being a Shoveler.

I agree, the bill is all wrong for a shoveler.

The orange foot does point toward Mallard. I was bothered by the lack of white at the trailing edge of the speculum, but I think that it may not be visible because it is in strong shadow.

Probably a Mallard, not a Northern Shoveler, not a Cinnamon Teal.
 
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