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Eastern Pacific storm petrels (1 Viewer)

Richard Klim

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Sausner, Torres-Mura, Robertson & Hertel 2016. Ecomorphological differences in foraging and pattering behavior among storm-petrels in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Auk 133(3): 397–414. [abstract]
 

mb1848

Well-known member
Thanks Laurent: the best part is where the paper describes Howell 2012 Petrels, Albatross and Storm Petrels as gray literature. That has been described as "non-conventional, fugitive, and sometimes ephemeral publications."
 

l_raty

laurent raty
Thanks Laurent: the best part is where the paper describes Howell 2012 Petrels, Albatross and Storm Petrels as gray literature. That has been described as "non-conventional, fugitive, and sometimes ephemeral publications."
Assignment was based on primary and gray literature (del Hoyo et al. 1992, Cornell Lab of Ornithology 2010, Howell 2012)

[...]
del Hoyo, J., A. Elliot, and J. Sargatal (Editors) (1992). Handbook of the Birds of the World, vol. 1: Ostrich to Ducks. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona, Spain.
[...]
Cornell Lab of Ornithology (2010). Neotropical Birds Online. http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu
[...]
Howell, S. N. G. (2012). Petrels, Albatrosses, and Storm-Petrels of North America: A Photographic Guide. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, USA.
It is quite odd to oppose "primary literature" (definition based on the nature and source of the content) to "gray literature" (definition based on publishing and distribution channels). Grey literature can be primary, if it reports directly the results of research but is not published through the usual commercial channels. Howell 2012 is published by Princeton University Press, a well established commercial and academic publisher, hence can hardly be called "grey". None of the three works cited above is primary literature.
 

njlarsen

Gallery Moderator
Opus Editor
Supporter
Barbados
Maybe gray refer to the overall blue-gray color of the cover of Howell's book? o:D

A little more seriously, using a somewhat derogatory term in a text such as this should have been avoided. I also agree with Laurent that none of these are primary. Usually, if you want to contrast "primary" with something else, "secondary" is the expected second option.

Niels
 

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