Eastern Yellow Wagtail? (1 Viewer)

Houbara2

Member
Found this in misty weather on Lizard Point this morning. So much white on the wing, especially the tertials. Calls of two types. A buzzy one often when on ground, and a rather more yellow wagtail like call in flight. Is ID on wing pattern possible? Hind claw visible in the other photo but from front doesn't really allow length to be judged.
 

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HH75

Well-known member
Hopefully you or someone else have gotten or can get sound recordings, a decent sound recording may prove this bird beyond reasonable doubt. At this time of year, such a 'grey and white' yellow wagtail certainly has a decent chance of being an Eastern. Also, a faecal sample might help...
 
Years ago the only equipment fir birders were binoculars and scopes, ten years ago affordable high end lightweight digital telezoom cameras became affordable and made a huge step for IDing on subtle plumage differences, right now accustics and sonogramms again are doing a huge step to better identifying cryptic taxons and soon genetic analyses will be more widely available. Easy to have a faeces collector with you (get one at your local pharmacy) and maybe it’s time now to invest in a sound recorder (quite affordable) and a good microphone (expensive, especially the small and handy directional ones), it will soon be the standard for acceptance for many taxons
 

James Eaton

Trent Valley Crew
In the field, how did that vent/belly appear? In the photos it appears as though it's got a yellowish tinge. If it was an Eastern, it would have to be a tschutschensis (taivana broader, yellower supercilium, macroynx lacks supercilium).

Immature tschutschensis that I see at this time of year would either have a completely white vent and belly, or, if there is colour there, it would also be found across the throat/breast too, or confined to the breast.

You mention a Yellow Wagtail-like call, which is not ideal! Eastern Yellow is a very different, piercing Citrine-like call. A sound recording would make it much easier.

James
 

njlarsen

Well-known member
Opus Editor
Years ago the only equipment fir birders were binoculars and scopes, ten years ago affordable high end lightweight digital telezoom cameras became affordable and made a huge step for IDing on subtle plumage differences, right now accustics and sonogramms again are doing a huge step to better identifying cryptic taxons and soon genetic analyses will be more widely available. Easy to have a faeces collector with you (get one at your local pharmacy) and maybe it’s time now to invest in a sound recorder (quite affordable) and a good microphone (expensive, especially the small and handy directional ones), it will soon be the standard for acceptance for many taxons

I recently bought this one for $25 which seems to do the trick (though I have limited experience yet): https://www.amazon.com/Saramonic-Di...p/B0725Y5TN1/ref=psdc_196575011_t1_B000MYPPPE

Niels
 

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