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Elite 10x42 phase coated (1 Viewer)

Binastro

Well-known member
On June 5 new white LED street lights were fitted outside my windows.

On June 6 at 3a.m. there was an extensive display of noctilucent cloud.
On June 7 at 3 a.m. there was a lesser display.
Birds began singing this morning during the display.

I normally used the Leica 8x32 BA which had excellent control of glare for these observations.
However, the surface brightness and whiteness of the new LED light is so high there was light spill/glare looking at the horizon just above the light.
This did not occur with the old light.

The 10x42 Elite is better and exhibits almost no glare here.
The AFOV of the Elite is smaller. The real field of the 10x42 Elite is 5.6 degrees the 8x32 BA 7.7 degrees.
The display looked beautiful in the 10x42 Elite with fine detail seen.
The noctilucent cloud moved faster than I have seen previously.

Close up photos of the LED lamp indicate some side shielding. Previously I asked for shielding which happened in two days for the old light, so maybe this was noted when installing the LED light.
I don't go out the front because of Covid and many passers by. So it may take a while before I can inspect the light from below.

My friend in Sweden unfortunately passed away mid March from this disease.
We spoke every two or three weeks for the past fifty years.
He seems to be a victim of Sweden's policy of non intervention and no official control of the disease.
Neighbouring countries have taken a different policy.

However, the U.K. statistics are truly awful and I avoid contact with people.

Regards
B.
 

Binastro

Well-known member
Andy, much appreciated.

This disease knows no boundaries.
We have more knowledge than we did one hundred years ago, so hopefully we may have some ways of minimising the impact.

We had the sunniest May on record, but yesterday brought a thunderstorm and much needed rain.

There is a bit more local wildlife, although car movements and pedestrian traffic are increasing. A lot more bicycles and a lot more runners in the early morning.

It is surprising how good a 1990s? 10x42 Elite can be.

The LED lights were a bit of a shock.
I heard workmen but only noticed the new lights when lit.
The cut off is very sharp and pools of white light flood the street. They probably produce reflection skyglow from the pavements and street.
Colours are quite good at night although I still hate LED lighting in general as the local 'security' lights are about 5 times overbright and produce massive light spillage.

Regards,
B.
 

dries1

Member
The LED application to local lighting has been a detriment to many astro viewers. Many times there is more light upward than illuminating the area at ground level.
Glad you got a chance to view with the Elite, I have never viewed through one...Nice to have a glass to combat glare, that is a big + in my book. My favorite glass combats it well at night, for example the Leica HD 12X50 thwarts glare better than most to my eyes.

Andy W.
 

Binastro

Well-known member
This morning June 17 at 3 a.m. I used the 10x42 Elite to view a fine bright display of noctilucent clouds low in the north.
As the display was slightly to the left of the white LED streetlight the Leica 8x32 BA gave a beautiful view also.

I should have also used the Canon 18x50 IS as the clouds were 400 miles away above Scotland, usually at about 82 km above sea level.
There was fine detail in the waves and bands.

Maybe a spotting scope also.

B.
 

Alexis Powell

Natural history enthusiast.
United States
The model you are discussing is the non-waterproof one, with focus on the far side of the hinge (excellent for use when wearing a hat), right? I liked that one (which has a very conventional view, with a some field curvature but little astigmatism) better than its successor, which has a flat field but also radical body sculpting (limiting grip options) and much astigmatism off-axis.

--AP
 

Binastro

Well-known member
Yes, Alexis the focus is on the far side of the hinge.

It says 61-1042 Japan BL in small print around the bottom of the focus knob.
A truncated triangle in gold colour in the middle of the focus knob bottom.
Also AB15xx serial number? around the bottom of the focus knob.

Mainly green multicoatings.

Regards,
B.

P.S.
Shining a bright torch through the binocular tubes there is no sign of moisture.
The binocular is very clean inside.

Rubber coated tubes.

The binocular is left on the table with no case for instant use.
Used for birds also.
 
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yarrellii

Well-known member
I was not aware of that model (with the focus wheel on the far end of the hinge; a feature I wish some models had, it feels to be in a more natural position). Apparently, those were B&L top of the range some 25-30 years ago or so. How would you rate them optically? And, by the looks of it, the device appears to have long and slim barrels, not unlike Dialyt. Is it possible that those had Abbe-Koenig prisms? Really intrigued by those.

As for the light; I live close a huge industrial warehouse and they have 3 huge LED-Blueish lights each one capable of lighting Wembley Stadium. Such a pity. I have to always look at the patch of sky in the opposite direction... which on the other hand increases my knowledge and appreciation of those particular constelations, cumulus and nebulae :D I only wish I could enjoy the stars on the other side as well!
Take care and clear skies!
 

Alexis Powell

Natural history enthusiast.
United States
I was not aware of that model (with the focus wheel on the far end of the hinge; a feature I wish some models had, it feels to be in a more natural position). Apparently, those were B&L top of the range some 25-30 years ago or so. How would you rate them optically? And, by the looks of it, the device appears to have long and slim barrels, not unlike Dialyt. Is it possible that those had Abbe-Koenig prisms? Really intrigued by those...

I liked them a lot optically, but they are nothing special (except the focus location) these days. Very early production was available with leather rather than rubber coating. Until ~1992 lacked phase coatings but it was added with great fanfare at that time. 7 degree FOV, nice sweet spot, gentle field curvature, relatively little astigmatism off-axis. They are SP, not AK prism, and have silver coatings I think. They are in those ways optically similar to the Leica BA/BN and as such very nice but not as wide or bright as today's best. Wish I had acquired the 7x36 model.

--AP
 

yarrellii

Well-known member
Alexis, thank you very much for the interesting comments. I've been searching a bit and I've come across the leather covered Elite. A beautiful device, reminded me somehow of the Trinovid.
When looking at offers of old but nice binoculars, I always wonder how would they compare with today's offering. I guess the build quality in some cases was rather high, but maybe coating technology has been "democrazised" and pretty inexpensive binoculars can give you bright and cripsy views to rival the old "sacred cows" in some respects.
Without leaving B&L, another of these binoculars that always leaves me wondering is the last of the Duscoverer, phase coated, that can be had for little money and which offers an opportunity to have a widefield 7x42 as backup/glove box pair. Always been very tempted. But then maybe a 150 $ Nikon AE can give a much sharper view!
 

Binastro

Well-known member
This morning around 3 a.m. I used the 10x42 Elite to view one of the best, if not the best, noctilucent cloud displays that I have seen in fifty years from England.

It stretched from 5 degrees elevation to 50 degrees elevation.
In azimuth from less than 320 degrees to 125 degrees.
It was in the both the northern and southern sky which is rare here.
Usually only in the north.
Very bright multiple changing forms.

Truly beautiful.

Probably courtesy of global warming.

Regards,
B.
 
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Alexis Powell

Natural history enthusiast.
United States
...Without leaving B&L, another of these binoculars that always leaves me wondering is the last of the Duscoverer, phase coated, that can be had for little money and which offers an opportunity to have a widefield 7x42 as backup/glove box pair. Always been very tempted...

A very nice binocular, though somewhat heavy/bulky. Good quality easy view. Should be great as a glove box bin. For long-term regular use, its Achilles heel is the diopter control, which can break and come loose.

--AP
 
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yarrellii

Well-known member
Binastro, last night we stayed up until pretty late and could enjoy the first glance of Andromeda of the year, as well as a lovely glance at the Milky Way, raising up vertically from the South and crossing a good part of the sky-vault. It was a view to behold :)

Alexis. Thank you for the information. I've been very tempted to get one as, like you say, glove-box bin. Being a sturdy 7x there would be less focusing required when using it in a rush, and in that case the weight and bulk are very secondary. I might get one, since 7x42 is my favourite format (even if they bulk/weight makes me use 8x32 on most occasions). Thank you very much, really informative, as always!
 

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