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Eriocnemis godini (Bourcier, 1851) (1 Viewer)

Taphrospilus

Well-known member
Eriocnemis godini (Bourcier, 1851) OD here

The Eponym Dictionary of Birds
Godin's Puffleg Eriocnemis godini Bourcier, 1851 [Alt. Turquoise-throated Puffleg]
Jean Louis Godin (1704–1760) was a French astronomer who worked in South America (1735). He was present in a minor role as a member of the French government-sponsored expedition to tropical America (1735–1738). After being with the expedition in Peru and Ecuador he was offered a post at Lima, Peru, as Professor of of Mathematics (1738–1751). He lost most of his money speculating and returned to Europe where he took the post of president of Cadiz midshipman's college. He was ennobled by the Spanish king for his work pertaining to the earthquake in Lisbon. Bourcier named two other hummingbirds after members of that expedition in the same paper that describes the puffleg. He was cousin to Jean Godin des Odonais (1712–1792), who was a French naturalist and professor in Quito, Ecuador, and married an heiress (1743) (q.v. Godin, I. above), resigned his chair and gave his time to natural science and Indian languages. Godin des Odonais explored in Ecuador and northern Peru, and collected a herbarium containing over 4,000 plant species. He also made drawings of c.800 species of animals. Later he spent 15 years exploring Cayenne and Brazilian Guiana, north of the Amazon. He donated his botanical collections to the MNHN, where they are still preserved. He published widely on both the plants and animals of northern South America, and also wrote dictionaries of South American languages. So it is possible that the bird is named after Godin des Odonais, but Jean Louis Godin is more likely. Only six specimens of this hummingbird are known, and it has not been recorded since the 19th century and a search (1980) for it was unsuccessful; it may be extinct.

The Key to Scientific Names
Louis Godin (1704-1760) French scientist, astronomer in Hispaniola, Ecuador and Peru 1735-1751 (cf. “Jean Godin des Odonais (1712-1792) ...French naturalist [nephew of Louis Godin] who was a professor in Quito” (Beolens & Watkins 2003)) (‡Eriocnemis).

Here Louis Godin (1704-1760) was part of the expedition. If Godin des Odonais is a valid candidate is unknown to me.
 

PScofield

Well-known member
I am confused as to why two 18th century naturalists are thought to be honoured by this eponym? The OD says:

Bourcîer adresse une Note sur onze espèces nouvelles de Trocliilidées, recueillies par lui en 1849 et 50, sans la république de Equator
 
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l_raty

laurent raty
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PScofield

Well-known member
That makes perfect sense Laurent and for this reason, Jean Godin des Odonais (1712–1792) does not seem like a good candidate at all especially considering that there was some negative sentiment in the 19th c about the fate of his wife!
 

Taphrospilus

Well-known member
I ask myself why the Eponym comp (not sure if this is the correct English word) him the additional name Jean? Where did this name derive from?
 

Björn Bergenholtz

(former alias "Calalp")
Sweden
I guess that you could blame Deutsche Biographie (here) ... ;)

If correct, or not (alt. the reason for/behind it), is all unknown to me.

I'd never heard about him (nor of "his" Bird) prior to this thread.
 
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