• BirdForum is the net's largest birding community, dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE!

    You are most welcome to register for an account, which allows you to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

Erythrocercus livingstonei francisi Sclater, WL, 1898 (1 Viewer)

Taphrospilus

Well-known member
OD of Erythrocercus livingstonei francisi here.

I just want give the name for discussion as I have no clue if The Eponym Dictionary of Birds is correct with:

Capt. H. F. Francis (d.1901) and his brother W. F. Francis (d.1900) were British explorers and collectors in Mozambique (1898); both served and were killed in the Boer War. Sclater's brief original description does not specify which brother is being honoured in the bird's name.

But it seem plausible from here

H . F . and W . Francis , and presented by them to the Museum.

I tend to attribute the name to H. F. Francis as he provided field notes to Sclater's article.

At least one of them H. F. Francis is mentioned in here several times with no additional names. He was part of the so called
Steinaecker’s Horse
(Francis Christiaan Ludwig von Steinaecker).

p. 29

During this confrontation the officer in charge of the fort, Captain HF Francis, and many of the Shangane troops,

p. 30-31
British archival records indicate that 337 members of Steinaecker’s Horse received special mention after the war. Of these 327 qualified for the King’s South African medal (BNA, WO 100/365). Eight members of the unit were specifically mentioned by Lord Kitchener (NAD, TAD, FK 1911, 1902). These are troopers DE Wilson and F Hennessey on 8 March 1902, Lieutenant WP Robertson and trooper WW Griffin on 1 June 1902 and captains HF Francis, AD Greenhill-Gardyne and lieutenants JM Dallamore and D Buchanan on 23 June 1902 (Woolmore 2006: 336).

p. 35
It was placed under command of Captain HF (Farmer) Francis. The garrison consisted of 30 men,4 but the local followers of Chief Mpisane were also armed (Pienaar 1990: 348). During the battle Captain Francis was killed and he was buried next to the fort.

So one of his names may Farmer supported by here. I would go one step futher as according here Henry Farmer Francis.

As the topic is very historical I assume it should be possible to get the names. And the King’s South African medal may help also to identify him.
 
Last edited:

PScofield

Well-known member
Henry Farmer Francis

Birth
1866 Umhlali Victoria County now Kwazulu Natal

Death Date:
07 Aug 1901 Impisane Komatipoort

Attached is probate
 

Attachments

  • francis.jpg
    francis.jpg
    162.2 KB · Views: 8

Björn Bergenholtz

... also known as "Calalp"
Some confirmation, and additional (gory) details, regarding Henry Farmer Francis, from a somewhat unsuspected source (at least in Ornithology), an Auction sales text, by the Noble Numismatics Pty Ltd (Auction 123; 31 March – 2 April 2020), for a "BOER WAR PRESENTATION SILVER SALVER" [my bolds and blue]:

[...]

On 16 May 1900, a day before the Relief Column entered Mafeking to end the 7 month siege, a 9 man patrol of the Imperial Light Horse, commanded by the prominent Australian, Major Walter Karri Davies, evaded the encircling Boer forces and entered the Town. There was much jubilation and singing of anthems at BP's headquarters on their arrival. After the relief, Major Karri Davies ordered a silver salver to be made and engraved for presentation to the Lowveldt big game hunter, Henry Farmer Francis, one of the 8 members of his patrol. Three days earlier Francis had lost his brother killed in action at the battle at Maritzani, a few miles south of Mafeking.

Farmer Francis later accepted a commission as Captain in Steinaecker's Horse and was killed in action during the pre-dawn battle at Fort Mpisane on 7 August 1901. He was already dead when ...

[...]

Information from the book titled Steinaecker's Horsemen by William (Bill) Woolmore, pp189 [= same book as in Martin's post #1, last link], 'Francis Henry Farmer [i.e. FRANCIS Henry Farmer (Surname first, in Capital letters)], Lieutenant/Captain (AO310 6:4:01): A well-known lowveld big game hunter who was highly respected by both whites and blacks. He had hunted with his friend, Percy Fitzpatrick, and is mentioned by name in Fitzpatrick's classic Jock of the Bushveldt. It was Francis who, years before the war, captured the lions kept at his residence, Groote Schuur, by Cecil Rhodes. He had shot a lioness and discovered that she had three cubs nearby. Francis took the cubs back to his camp which was located near the kraal of Chief Mpisane Nxumalo and they were foster-mothered by his setter bitch. He later gave the cubs to his friend, Percy Fitzpatrick, who kept them for some time until their size and the problem of housing the rapidly growing lions forced him to part with them. Fitzpatrick presented the lions to Cecil Rhodes who had a den built for them at his residence in the Cape. Before they could be delivered however one died as a result of snakebite. The other two were still living at Groote Schuur in 1909, many years after their capture. Prior to the Anglo-Boer War Francis was the first warden appointed to the Sabie Game Reserve which was later expanded to become the Kruger National Park. While a Lieutenant in Steinaecker's Horse he wrote to Percy Fitzpatrick to see if he could later have him appointed superintendent of the park.

Francis served previously as Trooper No.647 in the Imperial Light Horse and served with that unit in Ladysmith during the siege and later was a member of the column which relieved the besieged town of Mafeking. His brother, who was also serving in the Imperial Light Horse, was killed outside Mafeking. Farmer Francis was discharged from the Imperial Light Horse on 12 October 1900. He joined SH (Steinaecker's Horse) as Lieutenant on 12 November 1900 (AO281 13:2:01) and was promoted to Captain on 5 March 1901. He was killed in action (shot through the head) at Fort Mpisane, north of the Sabie River, near Hassan Ughaz on 7 August 1901 where he had been in command of the garrison. On 6 June 1902 Steinaecker reported that Francis 'would have been recommended for award for general good service and military ability had he survived'. Regardless he was Mentioned in Lord Kitchener's despatches (London Gazette 29 July 1902). Percy Fitzpatrick later said of him, 'a braver or a stauncher comrade no man could want'. He qualified for the QSA medal with clasps Defence of Ladysmith, Relief of Mafeking, Transvaal & SA 1901. His medal and clasps were sent to Mrs W.Buckle, Stampford Hill, Durban.'

[here]​
For what it's worth ...

/B
--
 
Last edited:

Björn Bergenholtz

... also known as "Calalp"
Sclater in 1899 spelled the bird name as francisci?
https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/36067#page/154/mode/1up .
As in a (failed) "first revisor act", or/alt. an (unjustified) emendation ..?!?

Surely that one must be considered as nothing but a typo/printer's error? Simply as W. L. Sclater's refrence to "Bull. B. O. C. vii. p.lx (1898)" takes us to the OD itself, and his own "Erythrocercus francisi". Note that he writes about the "two brothers—Messrs. H. F. and W. Francis, ..." on the preceding page (in the Ibis piece, titled/equipped; "With Field-notes by H. F. Francis). I don't think he changed his mind.

Though, I would say (and agree with Martin, as of his post #1) that the title of the additional piece in The Ibis piece talks (somewhat, or strongly) in favour of "H. F. Francis", as the sole, single dedicatee [as do the Latin (singular) ending-i, in francisi (versus a more appropriate plural -orum)].


And who ist the brother W. F. Francis (d.1900) ?

Haven't got a clue [who he "ist" ;)].

I know nothing about his brother "W. F. Francis", and even less of the "F." in his alleged name (not even sure it belongs there?). It could simply origin in a mix-up between the two brothers, who knows?

Keep digging!

Björn
 

Björn Bergenholtz

... also known as "Calalp"
Oooups! One quick search for 'Francis' and 'Maritzani' (simply following the clue; "his brother killed in action at the battle at Maritzani") took me to yet nother Auction sale (!), this time of a Medal, suddenly giving us: Walter (Edmund!?) Francis (as of here):

[...]
Walter Edmund Francis was one of the first to enlist with the Imperial Light Horse as evidenced by his low unit number (167) and the date 22–9-99 (ie just before the war officially declared). He and his brother were noted lion hunters and were as used as scouts enjoying “many a rifle duel with the enemy”.
[...]

For what it's worth.

Though, note that his [rank and] name on the Memorial monument is/was engraved: [CIAPORAL ?] "W. FRANCIS". See attached detail.

No middle "E" (and certainly no "F.").

Either way; he's not to confuse with Sir Walter Francis (Hely-)Hutchinson (1849–1913), Governor of Natal and Zululand, South Africa (1893–1901), here, who repeatedly turns up, time after time, all over, when searching for "our" poor, less renowned "Walter Francis".

Good luck finding him (as well).

/B
--
 

Attachments

  • Monument, detail.jpg
    Monument, detail.jpg
    106.8 KB · Views: 7
Last edited:

mb1848

Well-known member
Slater used francisci in 1899 and Björn wondered if it was an (unjustified) emendation ..?!?
Franciscus is a Latin given name, originally an epithet meaning "the Frank, the Frenchman. Franciscus may serve as the latinization of the English name Francis. So francisci is the poroper Latinisation of Francis. So E. francisci is a proper emendation?
ICZN 19.2. Justified emendations

A justified emendation replaces the incorrect original spelling and, as a corrected original spelling, retains the authorship and date of the original name [Arts. 32.2.2, 33.2.2, 50.4];
 
Last edited:

mb1848

Well-known member
No.
32.5. Spellings that must be corrected (incorrect original spellings)

32.5.1. If there is in the original publication itself, without recourse to any external source of information, clear evidence of an inadvertent error, such as a lapsus calami or a copyist's or printer's error, it must be corrected. Incorrect transliteration or latinization, or use of an inappropriate connecting vowel, are not to be considered inadvertent errors.
 

Björn Bergenholtz

... also known as "Calalp"
Slater used francisci in 1899 and Björn wondered if it was an (unjustified) emendation ..?!?
Franciscus is a Latin given name, originally an epithet meaning "the Frank, the Frenchman. Franciscus may serve as the latinization of the English name Francis. So francisci is the poroper Latinisation of Francis. So E. francisci is a proper emendation?
Picky remark, but just to be clear; I did not wonder "if it was an (unjustified) emendation", I wondered if you wondered (thought, or believed) it as such (following your short #4). Nothing else.

On my part, it's of less concern. ;)

If it is/was a proper emendation, or not, (or even an attempt, that failed) I gladly leave in more capable hands.

This far, I'm quite content with francisi.

Björn
 

mb1848

Well-known member
Yes.
32.5.1.1. The correction of a spelling of a name in a publisher's or author's corrigendum issued simultaneously with the original work or as a circulated slip to be inserted in the work (or if in a journal, or work issued in parts, in one of the parts of the same volume) is to be accepted as clear evidence of an inadvertent error.
Two pages later in the Index the name is spelled correctly.
https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/101092#page/500/mode/1up .
 

mb1848

Well-known member
I unfortunately agree with Martin "Nothing published on BirdForum is
published in the meaning of the Code – content is neither printed nor part of any
e‐publication that might qualify, so a published correction is needed" Picky picky
 

Björn Bergenholtz

... also known as "Calalp"
Once again I think we're drifting into a topic that ought to belong in the Bird Taxonomy and Nomenclature forum.

As I see it, even if francisi would/could/might have been intended as francisci (which I doubt), the Etymology itself would still be the same (aimed at the same Francis), thus only with a somewhat longer explanation.

In my mind, even if latinized the way you suggest, it doesn't change the who and why.

However; Mark, it was a sharp-eyed observation.

Keep up the vigilance!

/B
-
 
Last edited:

mb1848

Well-known member
"even if francisi would/could/might have been intended as francisci (which I doubt)," Björn
I disagree. In a printed separate volume of the BBOC at the beginning in the List of authors the BBOC spells the bird francisci whch is the correct spelling. This is dated July 30, 1898. The origional description misspelled is dated June 30, 1898. Then in the index to the last section of the volume is the index which again spells the name correctly. The two correct spellings by the publisher is "if in a journal, or work issued in parts, in one of the parts of the same volume) is to be accepted as clear evidence of an inadvertent error." According to the rules.
I think that anything around the name of a bird is best talked about in this subforum.

https://www.google.com/books/editio...sts_C/vARHAQAAMAAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1&bsq=francisci .
 

Björn Bergenholtz

... also known as "Calalp"
"even if francisi would/could/might have been intended as francisci (which I doubt)," Björn
I disagree. ...
Mark, like I said in post #11:
On my part, it's of less concern. ;)

If it is/was a proper emendation, or not, (or even an attempt, that failed) I gladly leave in more capable hands.
Disagreements, doubts, or not, either way, I'm pretty sure we can explain the Etymology of it.

Good luck having it changed!

Björn
 

l_raty

laurent raty
In my experience, the most widespread practice of this time would have been to latinize a given name, but not a surname -- for a bird named after a "Capt. H. F. Francis", "francisci" is not what I would have thought of as the most expectable. (OTOH, I'm not sure that Sclater would have reminded the details of the dedicatee of every taxon he had named, thus it seems conceivable that he had ceased being aware that "Francis" was a surname when he subsequently changed the spelling. Of course the person who compiled the index may well never have been aware of this either.)

Anyway:
32.5.1.1. The correction of a spelling of a name in a publisher's or author's corrigendum issued simultaneously with the original work or as a circulated slip to be inserted in the work (or if in a journal, or work issued in parts, in one of the parts of the same volume) is to be accepted as clear evidence of an inadvertent error.
corrigendum (pl. corrigenda), n. A note published by an author, editor, or publisher of a work, expressly to cite one or more errors or omissions in that work together with their correction.
The silent introduction of an alternative spelling in an index might conceivably be intended as a correction; but, short of a citation of the erroneous spelling used in the work together with this correction, this does not appear to qualify as a "corrigendum" as defined in the Glossary.
 

mb1848

Well-known member
Thank you Laurent. Interesting the distinction between surname and Christian. I agree with your analysis of 32.5.1.1 I had taken "corrigendum" informally as any correction. But that is wrong. But I believe that W. Sclater's use of one of the two spellings in the work in 1899 (from my first post) he acted as a first reviser. And according to 24.2.4 as the original author he does not need to list both spellings.
"Original authors may be deemed to be First Revisers of spellings. When the author, or one of joint authors, of two different original spellings of the same name subsequently uses one of them as valid in a work (including the author's or publisher's corrigenda), and neither had previously been selected as the correct spelling by a First Reviser, the author is deemed to be the First Reviser, whether or not the author cites both spellings together (that used as valid becomes the correct original spelling)."
 

l_raty

laurent raty
But I believe that W. Sclater's use of one of the two spellings in the work in 1899 (from my first post) he acted as a first reviser. And according to 24.2.4 as the original author he does not need to list both spellings.
This might be defensible, but only if the index was not published later than the description. As you indeed noted above, the description is in an issue dated 30 June; the odds seem great that the index was published at the same time as the title page and preface, i.e, 30 July. If so, there is only one OS, and no first-reviser act is possible.
 

Björn Bergenholtz

... also known as "Calalp"
Re. fransis(c)i vs 2 X francisci

In the second volume* of The Birds of South Africa (four volumes, 1900–1906), by Arthur Cowell Stark [and (at least vol. 3 and 4) completed by Wlliam Lutley Sclater], on pp. 258–259 (and in the Index), it is clearly written: "Erythrocercus francisci", with the following references; "W. L. Sclater, Bull. B. O. C. VII, p. 60 (1898)" [i.e. W. L. Sclater's OD itself, see #1], followed by; "id. [idem = ditto: W. L Sclater, again] Ibis, 1899, p. 112" [here], as well as; "Alexander, Ibis, 1900, p. 90 [here]"

Looks like it's not only Mark who thinks the proper spelling was, or ought to be; francisci.

For what it's worth. If relevant, or not.

Björn

[*This certain book, Vol. 2 (from "1901", according to Google), is the only one missing in BHL (here), but I've found one copy, with some access, in Google Books (though only in Snippet view); here]
--
 
Last edited:

Users who are viewing this thread

Top