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Escaped Lynx killed - UK (1 Viewer)

lewis20126

Well-known member
Tranquilliser darts are only viable at very short distances as they are mainly fired from air rifles or CO2 powered rifles and the tranquilliser dart does not make an particularly aerodynamic or accurate delivery option. Most competent people familiar with their use would not attempt their use at a distance much greater than 50m. Whilst agreeing that the killing of the Lynx was unfortunate, perhaps the authorities who took the decision to kill the lynx felt that an opportunity once presented had to be taken and that the distance was too great to use the less lethal option. Sometimes the Hard option is the one that has to be taken and I am sure the decision to use lethal force in this instance was not taken lightly

So if it couldn't be taken down by a tranquiliser, why was it shot at all, when it posed NO risk to humans [see above]?

cheers, a
 

willimac

Well-known member
That’s a question that can only be answered by those on the ground at the time, they had to make a difficult call and then live with the consequences. Maybe try walking a mile in their shoes
 

lewis20126

Well-known member
That’s a question that can only be answered by those on the ground at the time, they had to make a difficult call and then live with the consequences. Maybe try walking a mile in their shoes

Why was it a difficult call, when the data on lynx attacks (ie NONE) are a few clicks away?

cheers, alan
 

Strontium Dog

Well-known member
It's a myth that lynx have never attacked people; clearly the authorities were unwilling to tolerate the risk, however minor.
 

Egrets Ivadafew

Well-known member
Before citing my own personal experience with Lynx, can I say I don't like the idea of animals being shot when they could be tranquillised, and that I am in favour, generally, of re-introduction schemes. So...
We (me, my wife, and our two sons) had driven up to Derbyshire for the day. On the way home, we dropped off at a zoo (up in the hills somewhere near Matlock as I recall). It was a shabby, rather depressing place and we didn't stop long. It was also in mid winter, just starting to get dark, and we were the only people there. My youngest son (a toddler at the time -maybe three years old?) was running on ahead and parallel to (what we didn't realise) was the fence to a lynx enclosure. There were several lynx the other side of the fence and lazing in the grass, the way zoo animals do. The largest one suddenly scrambled to its feet, ran to the fence, and began stalking my son (I'm talking down on its belly, head down below its shoulders, carefully placing its paws to maintain silence). It was chilling enough for me to run forward and catch my son, and as soon as the Lynx realised I was there it ran off.
It happened twenty years ago but I can still picture it. The only thing I can think is that my son, small, alone, and running, fitted in with the Lynx concept of what was prey. I understand that people don't get attacked by these animals out in the wild, but then that's maybe because we don't tend to let small children run off on their own in the wild. I just know that that Lynx would have attacked my son if it could, no shadow of a doubt.
 

lewis20126

Well-known member
clearly the authorities were unwilling to tolerate the risk, however minor.

Our 'authorities' tolerate plenty of worse risks without substantive action. Unfortunately, 'authorities' like to be seen to do small achievable things when they are generally impotent in the face of much greater challenges and risks (from viscous dogs to terrorism and everything in between)

cheers, alan
 

nicklittlewood

Well-known member
From afar, the shooting of the Lynx certainly does appear to be an overreaction. Surely, though, Borth Wild Animal Kingdom must face a high proportion of the responsibility for what happend, give that the animal was kept in what was evidently an inadequate enclosure. They have stated that they are "outraged" which implies a lack of recognising that responsibility. With two of their Lynx being killed in recent days, their animal husbandry must be pretty questionable.
 

Farnboro John

Well-known member
It's a myth that lynx have never attacked people; clearly the authorities were unwilling to tolerate the risk, however minor.

Its a myth, is it? Facts please, given that people from various countries with Lynx populations, plus the research put up at post #14, suggest that it's not a myth.

Some definite non-myths: 3000 people a year lose their lives in RTA and nobody cares enough to abandon motor vehicles: deer gore people to death almost annually and nobody has suggested they should be extirpated: despite frightful wails of desperation about the danger from the ignorant nobody has yet ended up in A&E as a result of Wild Boar attack in Britain (or, so far as I am aware, elsewhere in Europe?)

Additionally, and this I think ought to count for a lot, we in Western Europe want those in Africa, Asia and the Americas to endure the risks associated with having all the big predators that do occasionally lunch off humans in their wildernesses. Those people carry on their lives despite the risks they are running.

We should, as a people, gird up our loins, shoot down ruthlessly the namby-pamby wet-nappied idiots that shot this lynx supposedly in our name and get on with having charismatic megafauna returned to our islands. The Welsh council's action is pathetic and if it does reflect the modern psyche of the British people, we are in deep trouble. Personally I don't believe it does: I know very few truly risk averse people and an awful lot of habitual risk takers.

John
 

Jos Stratford

Beast from the East
It's a myth that lynx have never attacked people.

Could you link to any examples?

Sure, it can't be ruled out that there has never been an attack in the history of Lynx and humans coexisting, but it is not a myth to say that Lynx do not attack people, it is a general truth.
 
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Sangahyando

Well-known member
despite frightful wails of desperation about the danger from the ignorant nobody has yet ended up in A&E as a result of Wild Boar attack in Britain (or, so far as I am aware, elsewhere in Europe?)
There are occasional boar incidents in Europe, not least in Germany where the boar population might just be on an all time high, thanks to excessive maize cultivation, combined with only semi-effective hunting methods and a general lack of tigers. The latest noteworthy incident saw two wild boar invading a small town and injuring four people before being disposed of.
Also, boar collisions in traffic are pretty nasty.

It's a common argument of environmentalists over here that boar are more likely to injure or even kill people than wolves - not to mention lynx - are, and they're not wrong (even if it were only due to the much higher boar numbers relative to those of large predators).
 

dantheman

Bah humbug
Our 'authorities' tolerate plenty of worse risks without substantive action. Unfortunately, 'authorities' like to be seen to do small achievable things when they are generally impotent in the face of much greater challenges and risks (from viscous dogs to terrorism and everything in between)

Gloopy dogs? They're the worst ...
 

MJB

Well-known member
John,
I take your point:
"...nobody has yet ended up in A&E as a result of Wild Boar attack in Britain...",

but what about those subject to the appalling mental stress of Wild Bore Attack in what seemed like a most welcoming pub? Survivors should petition Parliament for a debate on this hidden scourge!
MJB
 

Farnboro John

Well-known member
John,
I take your point:
"...nobody has yet ended up in A&E as a result of Wild Boar attack in Britain...",

but what about those subject to the appalling mental stress of Wild Bore Attack in what seemed like a most welcoming pub? Survivors should petition Parliament for a debate on this hidden scourge!
MJB

I suspect Parliament is the last place in Britain likely to be receptive to preventive measures against Wild Bores!

John
 

Strontium Dog

Well-known member
Could you link to any examples?

Sure, it can't be ruled out that there has never been an attack in the history of Lynx and humans coexisting, but it is not a myth to say that Lynx do not attack people, it is a general truth.

Hell, there are videos all over Youtube.
 

Loud Green Man

Well-known member
Well there's plenty of evidence the zoo that lost this critter has some way to go in demonstrating they are given of a meaningful competence to be entrusted with displaying lynx.

To lose one cat might be forgiven but to throttle a second in as many weeks suggests something is far from right.

LGM
 

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
A 'Lynx UK Trust' spokesman said

'there are no recordings of attacks on humans by healthy, wild Eurasian lynx anywhere in the world'.


A
 

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