• BirdForum is the net's largest birding community dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE!

    Register for an account to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

Espanola, Ontario, Canada - fat robin? (1 Viewer)

Bird Brainer

Well-known member
Supporter
Canada
Not sure what to make of this bird. It looks like an American Robin, but it much bigger! Middle image has a confirmed AMRO for size, and it seems so much bigger! And bluer! Many thanks again!!!!
 

Attachments

  • fat robin one farm 200621.jpg
    fat robin one farm 200621.jpg
    224.8 KB · Views: 41
  • fat robin with robin farm 200621.jpg
    fat robin with robin farm 200621.jpg
    1.7 MB · Views: 41
  • fat robin three farm 200621.jpg
    fat robin three farm 200621.jpg
    454.3 KB · Views: 41

Butty

Well-known member
All are American robins - so the bird in pic no. 1 is, in fact, the same size as every other American robin. You can't compare the sizes of birds in different photos without a comparative standard that's present in all the photos. Judging the size of a lone bird is notoriously unreliable.
 

Bird Brainer

Well-known member
Supporter
Canada
All are American robins - so the bird in pic no. 1 is, in fact, the same size as every other American robin. You can't compare the sizes of birds in different photos without a comparative standard that's present in all the photos. Judging the size of a lone bird is notoriously unreliable.
thanks, it just seems soo fat!! I guess it is a male? I looked up Varied Thrush and it does not have the markings for that..
 

Butty

Well-known member
The apparent shape of any bird (and this certainly does affect thrushes) varies with lots of factors - primarily posture and degree of feather-ruffling. When a bird ruffles its feathers it looks instantly bigger than it did a moment ago.
I think the bird in pic 1 is a male, but that is not relevant to the fact that, at the moment the photo was taken, it looks fat. And looking fat, of course, has no relevance to how big it is.
 

Butty

Well-known member
Note also that birds' sizes are conventionally assessed by overall length - bill-tip to tail-tip - so this is unaffected by a bird ruffling its feathers (and thus looking fat).
 

Bird Brainer

Well-known member
Supporter
Canada
This bird is definitely bigger than other robins in my area. It looks almost bloated, compared to the more sleeker profile of the others. I am sure I have 10 or so in my yard, and have been watching them for months. Makes it all the more interesting - I will continue to photo this anomaly for my own interest!
 

Bird Brainer

Well-known member
Supporter
Canada
All are American robins - so the bird in pic no. 1 is, in fact, the same size as every other American robin. You can't compare the sizes of birds in different photos without a comparative standard that's present in all the photos. Judging the size of a lone bird is notoriously unreliable.
It is the same bird in all pics.
 

Butty

Well-known member
This bird is definitely bigger than other robins in my area.
All American robins, once their feathers are full-grown, are - as far as would be noticeable in the field - the same overall length. This is just the way that the vast majority of bird species are - and will apply to all of the individuals of a given species in your area. As I've discussed, looking 'bigger' (if that means fatter, bulkier, heavier, etc) is a different issue.
 

PYRTLE

Old Berkshire Boy
Image no.1 does show a blueish cast to the upperparts and is possibly a photographic artefact rather than it's true colour. Regarding size, look at how variable human beings are though for passerines the size range is quite small. As you said, a fat American Robin.
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

Users who are viewing this thread

Top