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Exchange action of Zeiss straps!!! (1 Viewer)

Conndomat

United States of Europe
Europe
Hello,

E-Mail post from Zeiss!

Please replace the carrying strap of your ZEISS binoculars
For end customers

Batches of carry straps for our binoculars have exceeded legal limits on individual PAH (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons). ZEISS binoculars are not affected.
PAHs (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons) have carcinogenic, mutagenic and / or reproductive properties to humans and environmental organisms. Therefore, strict limit values ​​have been in force in the European Union since December 2015. "

We ask you to exchange the strap for your ZEISS binoculars. This concerns the series in the current assortment

Conquest HD
Victory SF, HT, RF, NV, FL, Pocket
Terra ED 32 and Terra ED 42
20x60S.

Please also exchange at Dialyt 8x56 GA T *, Dialyt 8x56 GA T * Special Edition and 7x50 GA T * Marine.

Using the form below, you can order a new strap directly from ZEISS and receive it free of charge.

You can easily dispose of the old straps in the trash.

We are happy to answer your questions via the free hotline 0800 934 77 33 and by email to [email protected].

Your ZEISS Consumer Products Team

Andreas
 

IAN JAMES THOMPSON

Well-known member
Hello,

E-Mail post from Zeiss!

Please replace the carrying strap of your ZEISS binoculars
For end customers

Batches of carry straps for our binoculars have exceeded legal limits on individual PAH (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons). ZEISS binoculars are not affected.
PAHs (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons) have carcinogenic, mutagenic and / or reproductive properties to humans and environmental organisms. Therefore, strict limit values ​​have been in force in the European Union since December 2015. "

We ask you to exchange the strap for your ZEISS binoculars. This concerns the series in the current assortment

Conquest HD
Victory SF, HT, RF, NV, FL, Pocket
Terra ED 32 and Terra ED 42
20x60S.

Please also exchange at Dialyt 8x56 GA T *, Dialyt 8x56 GA T * Special Edition and 7x50 GA T * Marine.

Using the form below, you can order a new strap directly from ZEISS and receive it free of charge.

You can easily dispose of the old straps in the trash.

We are happy to answer your questions via the free hotline 0800 934 77 33 and by email to [email protected].

Your ZEISS Consumer Products Team

Andreas
I had the same email supposedly from Zeiss. I couldn’t find anything about this subject on the Zeiss website. Which is why I’m worried it’s a scam email. Until I have some way that the email is definitely from Zeiss I’m not going to do anything about this and hopefully someone from Zeiss can confirm this email is defininetly true with this story, I’m wary of pressing about pressing any links and I’m not phoning or emailing anyone until I can get a confirmation that it’s true.
Ian.
 
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paddy7

Well-known member
I've just done this - a straightforward process, but you need the serial number of your bins.
Which, of course, made me realise i had no record of these, other than on the bins themselves, so have just spent 15 mins creating a doc with all serials recorded.
I don't use straps anyway (favouring the RYO harness) but may need them in the very, very, very unlikely scenario that i may ever sell the FL 8x32 or Pocket.
 

Binastro

Well-known member
Nearly everything we use or have used has problems.

If one looks up 'Disposal of glass' there are so many types, which have different rules. Lead glass, thorium glass, mirrors etc. etc.

Different local authorities have different rules for the same item.

The Hassleblad XPAN was stopped because of tiny amounts of lead solder. I think this should have been exempt considering how few were made.

Old photographic processes were dangerous.

Smoke detectors have small amounts of radioactive material.

My good friend was a clock repairer. He handled radium painted hands and clock faces. He had bottles of radium paint. I really can't understand why he is still around at 82. He has some medical problems. Could the radium be partly responsible? I don't know.

Then we have 'Mad as a hatter'.
Wall paper may have had arsenic.
Lead in paint.
Antifreeze in milk.

I used to manage our block but the EU regulations became so complex and different departments disagreed with other on the same item, we had to hand it over to a professional.
But even here things are impossible.
The fire brigade gives firm advice, the EU says differently, quite the opposite in fact.

In fact it is impossible to run a business or manage anything without breaking some law. Either EU, British or others.
I think that this is one reason for Brexit.

As to straps, I rarely use them except with heavy binoculars.
The Canon 18x50 IS has a strap, as did the Celestron 20x80.
The Zeiss Conquest HD 10x42 doesn't.

Zeiss are doing what is required under current laws.

Regards,
B.
 
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Conndomat

United States of Europe
Europe
I think that this is one reason for Brexit.

Regards,
B.

Hello Binastro,

maybe a small reason!

The main reason, however, is that the British governments have been talking badly about the EU for decades, they have credited themselves with everything that went well, the negative was always Brussels, and the Brexit campaign lied, it was a pity for so many Britons fell for the crap.

Andreas
 

MandoBear

Well-known member
Nearly everything we use or have used has problems.

If one looks up 'Disposal of glass' there are so many types, which have different rules. Lead glass, thorium glass, mirrors etc. etc...

...Then we have 'Mad as a hatter'.
Wall paper may have had arsenic.
Lead in paint.
Antifreeze in milk...

Let's face it - life is dangerous. I mean, ultimately, it's fatal...! :-O :-O

And yes, I also had the same email from Zeiss. I dug out the box my Conquest HDs came in order to get the serial number, rather than disturb the IPD setting on the bins themselves in order to make the serial number visible.
 

Binastro

Well-known member
Zeiss, amongst all optics firms, have been the most honourable regarding safety.
This may be because of ethics, or just a desire to have very high standards.

There is nothing particularly wrong with thorium glass, except perhaps to the workers grinding the glass.
Although now it is no longer allowed.

The 1975 Schott catalogue still had thorium glasses up to full thorium glass.
But Zeiss almost never used it.
I only found it in the 1.7x Mutar? a telephoto afocal converter.

Next Minolta, who made 150 types of glass themselves, and Nikon.
They only used it where really necessary. Fast telephotos etc.

Leica claimed they didn't use thorium glass. But they did, rather more often than Minolta or Nikon.

With Canon, Pentax and Olympus it was a free for all. It turned up everywhere.
TTH were perhaps even more a user of thorium glass as was Kodak, the first firm to use it in 1940.

Why do I mention this?

Because Zeiss may be particularly careful to comply with regulations.

It may be that many other makers straps contain similar chemicals and the makers either don't know, or are not so eager to comply.
Independent straps may be worse.

So any non Zeiss straps used to replace the ones noted by Zeiss as to be exchanged, may be worse than the ones people have.
It would be wise to accept Zeiss's offer to get compliant straps, rather than just using any straps.

It may be that even cloth or leather straps have problems.

As MandoBear says. Life is dangerous. Although at different levels of risk.

Regards,
B.
 

IAN JAMES THOMPSON

Well-known member
I’ve phoned Zeiss on the free telephone number and although the customer service gentleman was trying to speak English, I’m afraid I couldn’t make out very clearly what he was saying, even after I pressed the English language option. It was just impossible to make out what the customer service gentleman was saying about where the serial was on my binoculars. So I’m still no further forward.
Ian.
 

SteveTS

Well-known member
I've just done this - a straightforward process, but you need the serial number of your bins.
Which, of course, made me realise i had no record of these, other than on the bins themselves, so have just spent 15 mins creating a doc with all serials recorded.
I don't use straps anyway (favouring the RYO harness) but may need them in the very, very, very unlikely scenario that i may ever sell the FL 8x32 or Pocket.


For those who complete the online form (via the Zeiss email) Zeiss will send an e-voucher redeemable in their online shop and the new strap is completely foc... :t:
 

tenex

reality-based
Nearly everything we use or have used has problems.
Yes... to your list of hazards we could add cancer in chimney sweeps from coal tar, or possibly just anyone breathing the London air, and many more. (The hatters were using mercury, if anyone was wondering.) But those are somewhat extreme examples, and most of life is less obvious.

The EU is notorious for this kind of micromanagement, while here in the US we have California's voter-initiative Proposition 65, which obliges many products (including binos) to carry a label warning of "chemicals known to the state of California to cause cancer or reproductive harm". Would that be in the bino or the accessories? Would one have to eat them? Who knows. I wouldn't be able to sleep at night if I worried about binocular straps, especially ones that have been around for 20 years anyway.

Life can't be perfected, and people just don't reason with probabilities very well, even when there is a real threat. This became apparent in the 1700s when one had to decide whether to get inoculated against smallpox, and there was a small risk of contracting the disease from the inoculation itself. Even doing the math correctly (which some had discovered how to do) doesn't resolve all your doubts about the right decision.
 

etudiant

Registered User
Supporter
The EU is notorious for this kind of micromanagement, while here in the US we have California's voter-initiative Proposition 65, which obliges many products (including binos) to carry a label warning of "chemicals known to the state of California to cause cancer or reproductive harm". Would that be in the bino or the accessories? Would one have to eat them? Who knows. I wouldn't be able to sleep at night if I worried about binocular straps, especially ones that have been around for 20 years anyway.
.

The blunderbuss California Proposition 65 has forced manufacturers to label almost everything as 'known to cause cancer'. That includes warnings on rubber hoses that the water passing through them may not be safe to drink.

As a result, no one pays any attention to any of these notices, but producers of hazardous products now have a legal defense that the users were warned. Presumably that is exactly what the lobbyists wanted all along, cleverly allowing the useful idiots of the 'environmental' movement to spearhead passage of this law.
 

zzzzzz

Well-known member
The blunderbuss California Proposition 65 has forced manufacturers to label almost everything as 'known to cause cancer'. That includes warnings on rubber hoses that the water passing through them may not be safe to drink.

As a result, no one pays any attention to any of these notices, but producers of hazardous products now have a legal defense that the users were warned. Presumably that is exactly what the lobbyists wanted all along, cleverly allowing the useful idiots of the 'environmental' movement to spearhead passage of this law.

Doubt these warning labels will limit legal liability a judge just awarded 2 billion in a weed killer case, weed killer class actions lawsuits are being filled worldwide.

Canada has forced the tobacco giants to include warning labels on their cigarette packages for some time the provinces are still suing.

"B.C., in 1998, was the first province to sue tobacco companies for damages, adopting its first Tobacco Damages and Health Care Costs Recovery Act. Every province and territory (save the Yukon) has followed suit, with claims now exceeding $120-billion."

Its ironic Canada still allows the export of asbestos to India. Will they sue?
 
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