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Falkland Islands moth (1 Viewer)

Tanager

Well-known member
Hi,

Can anyone identify this moth from the Falklands?

Many thanks,

Mark
 

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honeym

Well-known member
Hi
A lateral photo might help. If you still have the specimen could you post one?
It probably ought to be a species of Noctuinae but I don't have access to my list of the species recorded from the Falkland Islands.
There are a few features of the adult that could be checked which might help narrow down the options.
Martin
 
Last edited:

Tanager

Well-known member
Hi
A lateral photo might help. If you still have the specimen could you post one?
It probably ought to be a species of Noctuinae but I don't have access to my list of the species recorded from the Falkland Islands.
There are a few features of the adult that could be checked which might help narrow down the options.
Martin
Hi Martin,

Thanks for replying, I’ve put some more photos in the ID forum. Hopefully they are helpful.
All the best,

Mark
 

honeym

Well-known member
Hi Andy - not a Nutmeg.

I still believe it is a member of the Noctuinae as I believe I can see a spined hind tibia in one of the additional photos.

Unfortunately, I don't have access to the (Natural History) Museum collection at the moment (due to Covid19) so I'm not sure I can get it any further. Being able to see the specimen would help - if that was possible? It may be that dissection of the genitalia will be needed.

Martin
 

honeym

Well-known member
I've just had a thought.

It might be Pareuxoa falclandica or a closely related species. I would need to see the collection (which I curated) to be more certain.

Martin
 

Tanager

Well-known member
Hi Andy - not a Nutmeg.

I still believe it is a member of the Noctuinae as I believe I can see a spined hind tibia in one of the additional photos.

Unfortunately, I don't have access to the (Natural History) Museum collection at the moment (due to Covid19) so I'm not sure I can get it any further. Being able to see the specimen would help - if that was possible? It may be that dissection of the genitalia will be needed.

Martin
Hi Martin,

The moth arrived as a vagrant on Bird Island, South Georgia following recent strong west/north westerly winds (hence presumed Falklands in origin). It has been kept and will be exported back to the UK at the request of the environmental unit at British Antarctic Survey.

Many thanks for your help,

All the best,

Mark
 

honeym

Well-known member
Hi Martin,

The moth arrived as a vagrant on Bird Island, South Georgia following recent strong west/north westerly winds (hence presumed Falklands in origin). It has been kept and will be exported back to the UK at the request of the environmental unit at British Antarctic Survey.

Many thanks for your help,

All the best,

Mark
Hi Mark

Thanks for the up-date. If there's any problem getting an accurate identification, you can always contact me (although retired I still have my Museum email m.honey 'at' nhm.ac.uk). I've also maintained an interest in the moths of the Falkland Islands (and South Georgia) ever since writing a short note with Nigel Bonner on the presence of Agrotis ipsilon on the latter, also on Bird Island, back in 1987.

I've always thought more species could turn up as wind-blown accidentals.

Best wishes

Martin
 

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