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Fine Swiss Watches in the Field..? (1 Viewer)

etudiant

Registered User
Supporter
Bravo!
I'd not dare to wear a watch like that in the field, even if I owned one.
It is probably silly to be too concerned about such heirloom pieces, they were built tough to begin with, but still....
My threshold of pain for field watches is at the budget Timex/Casio level.
 

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Hello The BulbMogul,

I own a very nice Vacheron-Constantin watch but it is a dress watch, quite unsuitable for field work. I bought it used 24 years, ago and it gave me good service until last year. By then it needed an overhaul. I was shocked at the estimate of its value made by the watchmaker. I still wear it but I wear it neither in Central Park nor on the Metro.

I own a genuine B. Altman quarts watch for the field. B. Altman was a Fifth Avenue department store which went out of business about 35 years, ago. Just a little bit more expensive than a Casio.

Happy bird watching,
Arthur :hi:
 

The BulbMogul

Well-known member
Bravo!
I'd not dare to wear a watch like that in the field, even if I owned one.
It is probably silly to be too concerned about such heirloom pieces, they were built tough to begin with, but still....
My threshold of pain for field watches is at the budget Timex/Casio level.

Hi there, I quite honestly only ear it out in the field if all we are doing is walking around with scope or binoculars. I would be very upset if I ever damaged it in any way...I have a hand full of pretty nice watches but the only Audemars Piguet.
 

The BulbMogul

Well-known member
Hello The BulbMogul,

I own a very nice Vacheron-Constantin watch but it is a dress watch, quite unsuitable for field work. I bought it used 24 years, ago and it gave me good service until last year. By then it needed an overhaul. I was shocked at the estimate of its value made by the watchmaker. I still wear it but I wear it neither in Central Park nor on the Metro.

I own a genuine B. Altman quarts watch for the field. B. Altman was a Fifth Avenue department store which went out of business about 35 years, ago. Just a little bit more expensive than a Casio.

Happy bird watching,
Arthur :hi:
I also would love to buy a new Vercheron one day as they are also a lovely and top quality piece..
 

jring

Well-known member
Bravo!
I'd not dare to wear a watch like that in the field, even if I owned one.
It is probably silly to be too concerned about such heirloom pieces, they were built tough to begin with, but still....
My threshold of pain for field watches is at the budget Timex/Casio level.

Agreed - while my nicer watches are nowhere near what is shown here, I would not wear them in the field, that is on anything more than a little walk around my home patch on a nice sunday afternoon.

If you insist on wearing a mechanical watch for a serious outing, I would recommend a Vostok Amphibia - rugged, waterproof and cheap to replace when it gets scratched, lost, stolen or eaten by a tiger.

Joachim
 

Troubador

Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
..........stolen or eaten by a tiger.

Joachim

Here we are, trying desperately to save tigers from extinction and all they do is steal and eat our watches!

I blame the parents. Tiger mums and dads just don't have the same sense of morals and integrity that they used to have so they can't teach their kids good manners.

Lee
 

Sterngucker

Well-known member
My heart pumps pi$$ for you guys. I must be lucky to no have such dreadful 1st-world problems: I just wear my custom Damasko DC66 24/7/365 without any fear of damage.
 

Sterngucker

Well-known member
That seems like a really nice watch. Good on you!


Damasko is a Sinn spin-off. They put a lot of effort into r+d and less into marketing and glitter. Their top models have in-house movements, the others are oem movements cased in-house in in-house cases. Their steel bracelet is an interesting piece of engineering.
Take a look at their 'Technologies' page: Germans are very good at engineering.


In over thirty years of watch collecting most of the fancy so-called alpha stuff is gone again. What has remained are a few Omegas, a Rollie 5813, a Sinn U1, a couple of Airmen ... and the Damasko DC66.


I think as we grow old we learn to separate the chaff from the wheat and whittling away we are left with things of aesthetic and engineering quality that have stood the test of time.
 

etudiant

Registered User
Supporter
Damasko is a Sinn spin-off. They put a lot of effort into r+d and less into marketing and glitter. Their top models have in-house movements, the others are oem movements cased in-house in in-house cases. Their steel bracelet is an interesting piece of engineering.
Take a look at their 'Technologies' page: Germans are very good at engineering.


In over thirty years of watch collecting most of the fancy so-called alpha stuff is gone again. What has remained are a few Omegas, a Rollie 5813, a Sinn U1, a couple of Airmen ... and the Damasko DC66.


I think as we grow old we learn to separate the chaff from the wheat and whittling away we are left with things of aesthetic and engineering quality that have stood the test of time.

Well, I looked up the Damasko web site and agree, they make really nice watches.
That said, they apparently can't be bothered to spell check their write up, so blatant typos remain, at least in the English language version. That just jars for a firm that highlights its focus on quality.
 

Sterngucker

Well-known member
LOL. I've noticed that on many German sites. Their English is perfect and needs no proof-reading from a native speaker. Otoh ... if we all spoke German as good as most of them speak English ... but sadly so many anglophones are very lazy when it comes to foreign languages (I am excluding Spanish/English speakers here in the US because the US has no official language and Spanish is so widely spoken here).
 

Tringa45

Well-known member
Europe
I've always been suspicious of Damasko's use of martesitic steel for some of their cases. It is probably an alloy that is used for some stainless steel knife blades and, although it can be hardened, its carbon content would make it less corrosion resistant than austenitic steels such as 316L or 904L.

If the watch comes into contact with salt water it should be rinsed off and even sweat getting under the case back could cause pitting corrosion in the absence of oxygen.

For their dive watches, I see that Damasco uses an austenitic "submarine" steel.

John

PS:- A quick look at the English web site didn't reveal any serious errors, but perhaps I've become desensitised after nearly half a century in Germany. German advertising though does sometimes contain some pretty excruciating anglicisms. A commonly seen Dutch one (for beer) is "Socialise Responsibility". Wtf is that supposed to mean?
 

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