Fine Swiss Watches in the Field..? (1 Viewer)

Sterngucker

RⒶdneck
I've always been suspicious of Damasko's use of martesitic steel for some of their cases. It is probably an alloy that is used for some stainless steel knife blades and, although it can be hardened, its carbon content would make it less corrosion resistant than austenitic steels such as 316L or 904L.

If the watch comes into contact with salt water it should be rinsed off and even sweat getting under the case back could cause pitting corrosion in the absence of oxygen.

For their dive watches, I see that Damasco uses an austenitic "submarine" steel.

John

PS:- A quick look at the English web site didn't reveal any serious errors, but perhaps I've become desensitised after nearly half a century in Germany. German advertising though does sometimes contain some pretty excruciating anglicisms. A commonly seen Dutch one (for beer) is "Socialise Responsibility". Wtf is that supposed to mean?


LOL ... I also have a Sinn U1 (Germanischer Lloyd rated 'submarine' steel) and so far the Damasko has fared no worse, ie. neither shows any sign whatsoever of wear or specifically rust/pitting.


PS. Here's a discussion of Damasko's steel and rust.
 
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etudiant

Well-known member
I've always been suspicious of Damasko's use of martesitic steel for some of their cases. It is probably an alloy that is used for some stainless steel knife blades and, although it can be hardened, its carbon content would make it less corrosion resistant than austenitic steels such as 316L or 904L.

If the watch comes into contact with salt water it should be rinsed off and even sweat getting under the case back could cause pitting corrosion in the absence of oxygen.

For their dive watches, I see that Damasco uses an austenitic "submarine" steel.

John

PS:- A quick look at the English web site didn't reveal any serious errors, but perhaps I've become desensitised after nearly half a century in Germany. German advertising though does sometimes contain some pretty excruciating anglicisms. A commonly seen Dutch one (for beer) is "Socialise Responsibility". Wtf is that supposed to mean?

Wow, that is a whole lot more in depth steel know how than is the norm!
I did think that the emphasis on 'submarine steel' was a little over the top, but am delighted to receive a bit more practical information to confirm my doubts.
Two immediate beefs with the English language site were the typo on the anti magnetic specification, written as 'anit-magnetic', followed by the arm bands getting labelled as 'manufactury', rather than 'own make' or 'factory issued'.
There may be others, but the stilted 'denglish' copy really did not do justice to what appear to be finely crafted hardware.
 

Alexis Powell

Natural history enthusiast.
United States
Hey folks, no more discussion of German watches in the fine _Swiss_ watch thread! Where are the mods when you need them?

--AP
 

elkcub

Silicon Valley, California
United States
Ok, I've used three fine Swiss watches since 1985: Rolex Date, Rolex Zephyr, and Victorinox V7-20, which is a dive watch good to 200m. Nowadays, the Rolex models reside in a safe but get wound every few months. The V-7 gets a new battery every year or so.

Ed
 

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