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Fireworks and birds and other wildlife (1 Viewer)

KenM

Well-known member
Probably just a coincidence but....a distinct lack of birds during my 2 hour window watch this am.

Perhaps a case of too much ''fizz bang!'' the night before....with a heavy ''hangover'' of cordite in the air.:-C
 

Jos Stratford

Beast from the East
If my memeory is correct iam pretty sure the brunnich's Guillemot at Portland disappear on the 1st january possible after new years fireworks

If we scan back over the last x years, I would suppose we can find individual rarities that disappeared on every calendar date of the year.

I would suppose it could be more meaningful if we, on an annual basis, see a marked exodus of common migrants from the UK/areas affected by fireworks on 5 November.

Did any European rarities disappear in the immediate hours following dawn on 24 June this year? :-O
 

King Edward

Well-known member
Never mind fireworks, there should be much greater controls on bonfires. I live in a reasonably rural area but there is frequently poor air quality from fires (not just at this time of year). Garden fires mostly, of material that could just as well be composted or piled to rot. If it was just around Nov 5th I wouldn't mind so much, but I really see no need for routine 'waste' disposal in this way. I say 'waste' because much of it is actually good organic matter, valuable both as a habitat resource and as a soil improver once rotted.
 

keith

Well-known member
Nope, haven't (nor any dog) - yet the police and others can train dogs (and horses) to withstand severe provocation. Maybe it needs to start very young?

Agree on wildlife.

A lot of gun dogs fail because they can't get used to the bangs.
 

saluki

Well-known member
A lot of gun dogs fail because they can't get used to the bangs.

A lot of gun dogs 'fail' because their owners don't know how to train them, dogs aren't born gun-shy. Getting pups used to a gun firing is fairly easy, but then that's going to be part of a gun dogs training. Different with fireworks and your average pet dog, most owners don't attempt to train them to ignore loud bangs - quite understandable. It's usually too late to start training them on 5th November, after that their behaviour is set and it becomes much harder to break that behaviour.
 

Euan Buchan

The Edinburgh Birdwatcher
Supporter
Scotland
There were not many fireworks round my street this year then before. A lot of folk were annoyed the main firework display in town was cancelled due to high wind and it wasn't even windy at all.
 

Sangahyando

Well-known member
A lot of gun dogs 'fail' because their owners don't know how to train them, dogs aren't born gun-shy. Getting pups used to a gun firing is fairly easy, but then that's going to be part of a gun dogs training. Different with fireworks and your average pet dog, most owners don't attempt to train them to ignore loud bangs - quite understandable. It's usually too late to start training them on 5th November, after that their behaviour is set and it becomes much harder to break that behaviour.
Yeah... but I'm pretty sure that dogs in their natural state, like other animals, aren't very partial to loud and sudden noises. Otherwise they would be too dumb to live. Still I agree that most dogs are poorly trained, which is a tragic waste.


There were not many fireworks round my street this year then before. A lot of folk were annoyed the main firework display in town was cancelled due to high wind and it wasn't even windy at all.
Could be an excuse for saving money.
 
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