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Firth of Forth - Shag (1 Viewer)

Gander

Well-known member
I used to send in my ringed Shag sightings from my local patch (Seafield, Fife) until a few years ago. I stopped as response was sporadic, and I felt that as I was so close to the ringing site on the Isle of May, that the information was of little value. A couple of days ago, I bumped into someone from the Shag project, who was carrying out a survey on my patch. He convinced me that the information was of value, especially now that they had started ringing on the Inchkeith, in addition to May, so I have committed to sending in my reports again. I have also been assured that response to reports has improved.

As such, please see attached photo. Would I be correct in saying that the third letter has to be a O?
 

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delia todd

If I said the wrong thing it was a Senior Moment
Staff member
Opus Editor
Supporter
Scotland
LOL I thought DWA?

Do they accept pictures with the reports Paul?
 

Stonefaction

Stuck in Dundee.....
Scotland
RWA, I'd say. The letters are printed twice on the ring, so the very bottom of the letters can be seen on the right hand side of the ring - there are six 'tips' visible, 2 for the R, 2 for the W and 2 for the A.
 

Gander

Well-known member
RWA, I'd say. The letters are printed twice on the ring, so the very bottom of the letters can be seen on the right hand side of the ring - there are six 'tips' visible, 2 for the R, 2 for the W and 2 for the A.
You are spot on. Managed to get a better photo this afternoon.
 

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citrinella

Well-known member
I used to send in my ringed Shag sightings from my local patch (Seafield, Fife) until a few years ago. I stopped as response was sporadic, and I felt that as I was so close to the ringing site on the Isle of May, that the information was of little value. A couple of days ago, I bumped into someone from the Shag project, who was carrying out a survey on my patch. He convinced me that the information was of value, especially now that they had started ringing on the Inchkeith, in addition to May, so I have committed to sending in my reports again. I have also been assured that response to reports has improved.

As such, please see attached photo. Would I be correct in saying that the third letter has to be a O?
Excellent, thank you. Glad you got the better photo.

CEH aided by Lothian Ringing Group have been ringing shags on the south Forth islands for many years - including Inchkeith, Craigleith and Fidra. Use of colour rings has ramped up over the last decade or more so that for several years all the birds ringed have been fitted with colour rings. This has been a great success with thousands of reports submitted from third parties up and down the east coast.

All reports are welcome and are used by CEH to inform government on progress on their obligations on seabirds. In that light I would entreat anyone to report sightings to CEH. I can provide an email address by PM if required.

Mike McDowall,
Ringing Secretary, Lothian Ringing Group.
 

delia todd

If I said the wrong thing it was a Senior Moment
Staff member
Opus Editor
Supporter
Scotland
RWA, I'd say. The letters are printed twice on the ring, so the very bottom of the letters can be seen on the right hand side of the ring - there are six 'tips' visible, 2 for the R, 2 for the W and 2 for the A.
Well worked out Barry!!!
 

Gander

Well-known member
Excellent, thank you. Glad you got the better photo.

CEH aided by Lothian Ringing Group have been ringing shags on the south Forth islands for many years - including Inchkeith, Craigleith and Fidra. Use of colour rings has ramped up over the last decade or more so that for several years all the birds ringed have been fitted with colour rings. This has been a great success with thousands of reports submitted from third parties up and down the east coast.

All reports are welcome and are used by CEH to inform government on progress on their obligations on seabirds. In that light I would entreat anyone to report sightings to CEH. I can provide an email address by PM if required.

Mike McDowall,
Ringing Secretary, Lothian Ringing Group.
Do the colours represent any thing? Ringing site maybe?

I noticed a red ring this afternoon. Couldn't read the lettering, but first red ring I've seen. Thought it might be from Inchkeith, as the surveyor I bumped into, told me that they had started ringing there this year.
 

citrinella

Well-known member
Do the colours represent any thing? Ringing site maybe?

I noticed a red ring this afternoon. Couldn't read the lettering, but first red ring I've seen. Thought it might be from Inchkeith, as the surveyor I bumped into, told me that they had started ringing there this year.
Sorry for the slow reply - I'll see what I can find out.

Mike.
 

citrinella

Well-known member
Do the colours represent any thing? Ringing site maybe?

I noticed a red ring this afternoon. Couldn't read the lettering, but first red ring I've seen. Thought it might be from Inchkeith, as the surveyor I bumped into, told me that they had started ringing there this year.
Hi Gander,

Apparently the CEH project used red rings for a while some years ago - so the bird you saw was probably ringed some years ago, perhaps more than 10. Colour is not related to site - just what they happened to be using at that time.

As I said before, the "surveyor you bumped into" is not quite correct. From the data in the BTO database (and not all really old records are in the database) small numbers of shag have been ringed on Inchkeith every year since 1985. Colour rings (according to long time ringers - this is difficult to check in the database) have been being used for 20 years or more. The colony on Inchkeith became properly established with a big surge in numbers ringed in 2000. For a few years after that numbers ringed fluctuated but since about 2008 the increase seen in 2000 has been sustained. Please remember that numbers ringed can be a poor indicator of colony size as weather may prevent access at the critical time for ringing. Volunteers may not be available at the right time either.

Lothian Ringing Group and predecessors - going back to individual ringers - have been shag ringing on the southern Forth islands in association with CEH for a very long time. An older ringer tells me certainly since the 1960s, maybe longer. The BTO database includes records from Craigleith regularly since 1971, Inchkeith as noted since 1985, and Fidra and Inchmickery since 2008 though efforts have sometimes been held back depending on landlord permissions.

Hope this is of interest.

Thank you very much for submitting your sightings, as I said all are of value in helping CEH produce an accurate picture of long term trends in the health of our seabird populations. I am pleased to hear you are getting good feedback from them. If you want to know more about their projects it might be best to approach them. Enjoy your birding :)

Mike McDowall.
Ringing Secretary, Lothian Ringing Group.
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia

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