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ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

Focuser smoothness on NL Pure? (3 Viewers)

BabyDov

Well-known member
Supporter
United States
I can see where using a pole, while sitting looking straight ahead looking at a more fixed subject, might be helpful. However. more often, I am looking upward into trees when following birds. It's hard to imagine pivoting my binoculars upward and sideways, while they rest loosely on a stick as I hold both stick and binoculars together. I think, then, the head rest might work better
 

SUPPRESSOR

Well-known member
England
Hi

I will happily put up a picture to demonstrate the ‘hold’ I adopt. The only downside is that after many years of deploying the bins in this fashion you might notice light marking on the side of objective armouring that is in light contact with the stick. This of course might be mitigated by slipping a length of cycle intertube of stitched leather over the stick in question.

I do not rest the bins in a V shaped cradle at the top of the stick.

I’m convinced this will deliver significant improvement over use of the NL’s headrest and suggest physics supports (no pun intended) my view.

LGM
Entering into the realms of fantasy here!
 

BabyDov

Well-known member
Supporter
United States
Without the lanyard, do you grip the stick and your binocular in the same way? If so, won't you be introducing more shake, especially with your right hand, that no longer is helped by a lanyard adding more steadying support for your binocular?
 

SUPPRESSOR

Well-known member
England
If you say so and for the last 40-years.

As promised the best picture I could take using a self-timer. Clearly I have added a lanyard to further aid one’s grasp but it’s not essential:
View attachment 1399067
View attachment 1399068
LGM
Yes, I see where you are coming from ,but, I got rid of my scope and tripod so I could travel light.
You certainly look the part and those monster Zeiss you do well with using just a stick and not a hoist!
I find my forehead rest does a very good job not perfect, but, apart from the wife what is!
Peter.
 

rpg51

Well-known member
Supporter
I can see where using a pole, while sitting looking straight ahead looking at a more fixed subject, might be helpful. However. more often, I am looking upward into trees when following birds. It's hard to imagine pivoting my binoculars upward and sideways, while they rest loosely on a stick as I hold both stick and binoculars together. I think, then, the head rest might work better
Its like a monopod. Western hunters use a tripod to stabilize binos when searching for animals with higher power binos. The extra support is helpful for sure. What you do for support depends in the situation you are in and what you are trying to accomplish. My personal feeling is that a stick or mono pod or trippod is best used when looking across long distances at animals or birds that are essentially stationary. The headrest in my opinion is excellent as well and provides both stability AND quick and accurate eye placement aligned with the exit pupil. Also, the head rest takes some pressure off your glasses if you are wearing glasses. I would not use a stick etc. when trying to observe fast moving subjects. But, that's just me.
 

Loud Green Man

Well-known member
Without the lanyard, do you grip the stick and your binocular in the same way? If so, won't you be introducing more shake, especially with your right hand, that no longer is helped by a lanyard adding more steadying support for your binocular?
Stick goes between fingers. No shake and at the risk of stating the obvious the advantage of this is the significant reduction in vertical movement.

I accept this is not the ideal setup if you’re attempting to make contact with and track/pan high flying birds but in a woodland setting where deliberate and un-rushed target acquisition is the order of the day you won’t be disappointed. And of course you’ll be using a pair of NL’s with that super-wide field of view so no losing sight of that delightful Goldcrest as it flits from fir to fir.

LGM
 

GrampaTom

Well-known member
United States
LGM, I think I dig this. I to travel light and hiking is an integral part of birding. Having a hiking staff in one hand to help with the walking, sure beats a tripod over the shoulder. The monopods, requiring some sort of bino adapter on top, would not be the best hiking staff. My terrain is trail between salt marsh and large open bay, where the viewing is mostly horizontal, out over those water bodies at swimming waterfowl and scampering shore birds. Cool, thanks
 

GrampaTom

Well-known member
United States
LGM, looks like each knot location on the longish "lanyard" loop thingy is for different viewing situations. The top one in the pic seems for standing. Is it the case the others are for when leaning or sitting? I see 3 is there more? T
 

Loud Green Man

Well-known member
LGM, looks like each knot location on the longish "lanyard" loop thingy is for different viewing situations. The top one in the pic seems for standing. Is it the case the others are for when leaning or sitting? I see 3 is there more? T
It can be gripped lower but if sitting you can improve stability further by angling the stick under the right knee and over the top of left. This locks things up for super-steady viewing!

The reason for more than one knot in the lanyard is you won’t always be on level ground when standing.

I have a number of sticks for different situations. I carry this one when out shepherding and it is great for when sitting down for a spot of lunch and scanning for anything of interest. I made the moveable grip from bits I picked up in a charity shop and a car exhaust mounting rubber I found lying in the road!
B8C647A9-5B9E-46AF-9EED-445915D874CF.jpeg LGM
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia

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