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From my Manhattan Window (1 Viewer)

KC Foggin

Super Moderator
Staff member
Opus Editor
Supporter
United States
Hello KC,

It is a "common yellowthroat," once called a Maryland warbler or a Maryland yellowthroat. I dislike the current name just as I dislike the name "yellow dumped warbler" and prefer the old name fo myrtle warbler.

Stay safe,
Arthur

And I don't feel as though any bird should have the name "Common" to it.
 

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Hello,

Yesterday, I saw a juvenile red-tailed hawk in a tree, in front of my block of flats. I had a good look at it, explaining to others that it was a juvenile, not a chick. Someone in the building 'phoned the New York Audubon society, to ask if there was anything to do, as the bird was very quiet, but he had to leave a message. Someone else called the Parks Department and the fire brigade arrived to remove the bird. Then the Audubon society returned the call and its worker was aghast. He wanted to contact the fire brigade to retrieve the bird and put it back in the tree. In all probability the parents were around and the fire brigade was lucky that the parents did not attack them.
Just another day in a restricted New York. If all goes well, I might see a barber, next week.

Stay safe,
Arthur
 

delia todd

If I said the wrong thing it was a Senior Moment
Staff member
Opus Editor
Supporter
Scotland
Hello,

Yesterday, I saw a juvenile red-tailed hawk in a tree, in front of my block of flats. I had a good look at it, explaining to others that it was a juvenile, not a chick. Someone in the building 'phoned the New York Audubon society, to ask if there was anything to do, as the bird was very quiet, but he had to leave a message. Someone else called the Parks Department and the fire brigade arrived to remove the bird. Then the Audubon society returned the call and its worker was aghast. He wanted to contact the fire brigade to retrieve the bird and put it back in the tree. In all probability the parents were around and the fire brigade was lucky that the parents did not attack them.

What a sad mess by well-meaning people. I do hope it can be sorted out and the youngster returned. Please let us know if you can Arthur.

Just another day in a restricted New York. If all goes well, I might see a barber, next week.

Stay safe,
Arthur

We're a way off that here yet I think; had to take the scissors to my own hair the other day!:eek!:
 

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
good exercise

Hello all,

As I have been confined to my estate's private garden, I have seen very little new: just a common grackle and a northern flicker, last week. I have been going around and around that garden 8km, almost daily. I long for a change, but my physician forbids it. He and a I are both awaiting a vaccine.

Images are by Louis Agassiz Fuertes. The grackles are from Birds of New York and the flicker from Woodpeckers by Fannie Eckstrom.
Stay safe,
Arthur
 

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KC Foggin

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Opus Editor
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United States
Better to be safe than sorry Arthur but I know the feeling buddy.

Glad you got to see a couple of birds though ;)
 

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Another binocular and some birds

Hello,

On Thursday, I received my newly acquired eighty one yea old B&L 8x30 binocular from my optical technician. It is not a zephyr model but it is coated, which is odd. I took it bird watching on the weekend as far as my the garden of my building complex, or housing estate if you prefer.

I managed to see a wood thrush, female and male common yellowthroats, AKA Maryland warblers, a female yellow bellied sapsucker, a northern flicker, and a small flock of blue jays, perhaps six.

Stay safe,
Arthur :hi:
 

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elkcub

Silicon Valley, California
United States
Congratulations on your new ol' B&L 8x32 ! I'm surprised that it affords enough eye relief for you.

Ed
 

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Hello Ed,

As I have gotten older my ophthalmic prescription has changed from -7 to -4.5. Before the overhaul, the binocular was just able to focus at infinity. The technician set it to clearly focus at infinity. In the daytime, with my iris "stopped" down, my astigmatism is minimised. I could not use the binocular without my specs for astronomy.

Stay safe,
Arthur :hi:
 

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Hello,

Still trying to exploit by building's garden as much as possible. I still see small flocks of blue jays and frequent see northern flickers. Today, I though I saw a female red shafted one, but that is usually a western bird. Yellow or red shafted, it was a female.

Stay safe,
Arthur :hi:
 

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Hello all,

The weekend has been very rewarding on my small patch. Saturday, I my first juncoes and white throated sparrows of the season, as well an immature black throated blue warble. Today, I saw an immature green throated blue warbler [sorry, I cannot find links for illustrations of the warblers] Today, I also saw a female ruby crowned kinglet.
Saturday was a nice day of overlapping sessions, with both juncoes and a gray catbird.

Stay safe,
Arthur :hi:
 

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Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
An autumnal visitor and something less than common

Hello,

My garden revealed two nice birds. On Friday, I saw a great crested flycatcher and on Saturday, I saw a sign of autumn, a rufous sided or Eastern Towhee. Both are firsts for my garden birding.

Stay safe,
Arthur :hi:
 

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Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Congrats on you garden list getting these two beauties Arthur!

Hello KC,

Thank you.

On Friday, I had a modern glass with quick focussing, which was needed because that flycatcher was rather active. On Saturday, I had an old B&L Porro, which worked well for the situation.

This brings my block of flats, apartment building/garden list to 34, not bad for 320 metres from Broadway but there is only one building separating me from the Hudson River Park.

Stay safe,
Arthur :hi:
 

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
migrants, a warbler and a common bird

Hello all,

Welcome to my limited world, one hectare in Manhattan.

In the last couple of days, I have seen a female or immature blackpoll warbler, , common birds which had not yet been seen by me in the building's garden: a tufted titmouse, which were scarce last winter, a song sparrow and a brown creeper.

Stay safe,
Arthur :hi:
 

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KC Foggin

Super Moderator
Staff member
Opus Editor
Supporter
United States
Sounds pretty good Arthur.

I've noticed the Titmouse population seems to have declined a bit this year.
 

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Hello,

I am still seeing confusing autumnal warblers, but I keep on thinking they are immature pine warblers, possibly an immature yellow warbler. I am seeing thrushes but I think they are more Swainson's and hermit thrushes.

Last Sunday. I did see a field sparrow, a first for my garden. On Friday, I saw a white breasted nuthatch, another garden first. I am always delighted by nuthatches circling down a tree, headfirst.

Stay safe,
Arthur :hi:
 

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KC Foggin

Super Moderator
Staff member
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United States
Hi Arthur!

Luckily, I get to see the Red-breasted and White-breasted Nuthatches in addition to my standard Brown-headed Nuthatches but only occasionally.

It looks like it might be another irruptive year for the Nuthatches like we had 5 & 8 years ago. I'm getting reports about them being seen in North Carolina so fingers are crossed ;)
 

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