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From my Manhattan Window (2 Viewers)

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Hello,

On Tuesday, I had a follow up visit to the otolaryngologist, which allowed me to visit the Reservoir, again. The northern shovelllers were present, which is no longer the case for the Lake. There were also ruddy ducks, mallards, American coots and a double crested cormorant.

Elsewhere in the Park, I saw a palm warbler and a black and white warbler. Last week, I did see a northern rough winged swallow. So the season progresses.

On another note, after my year palm warbler.jpg black and white warbler.jpg rough winged swallows.jpg long absence from the Park, I have happily met some folks, Park workers, birdwatchers, including Chris Cooper, and others, whom I was happy to see again and they were happy to see me.
Stay safe and have a happy Earth Day,
Arthur :)
 

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Hello,

As I implied earlier, New York often has a very short spring. This morning it was 11ºC and the temperature may rise to 27ºC.

On the 21st and on the 26th, inst., I saw a red breasted nuthatch, in Central Park. On the 22nd, I saw a field sparrow in my garden. On the 22nd, I saw a great egret, at Turtle Pond and on the 26th, I saw a black crowned night heron at the Lake, near Oak Bridge; yesterday, I saw a northern waterthrush, near Triplets Bridge.

Stay safe,
Arthur
nuthatches II.jpg Field sparrow.jpg egret.jpg night heron.jpg northern waterthrush.jpg
 

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Hello,

Last week, I had a tentative sighting of bird, which I confirmed yesterday: a gray catbird. Yesterday, I managed to see a blue headed vireo, a yellow rumped warbler, aka Myrtle warbler, and a common yellow throat, aka Maryland warbler, and a cerulean warbler. Today, I saw a Cape warbler, but the catbird, gray.jpg blue headed vireo.jpg Myrtle Yellow.jpg Maryland yellowthroat.jpg Cerulean warbler.jpg lighting was poor, so I did not see much colour;

Stay safe,
Arthur
 

KC Foggin

Super Moderator
Staff member
Opus Editor
Supporter
United States
Hi Arthur!

That sure is a lovely image of this Cape May Warbler. Not a bad few days for you guy ;)
 

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Hi Arthur!

That sure is a lovely image of this Cape May Warbler. Not a bad few days for you guy ;)
Yes, a good couple of days.
All the images are from paintings by Louis Agassiz-Fuertes and published in Eaton's Birds of New York , New York State Museum, 1912-1914.

Stay safe,
Arthur
 
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Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Hello,

Bird from Monday, which I neglected to mention, were a wood thrush and a black throated blue wood thrush.jpg Black throated blue wing.jpg Indigo bunting.jpg warbling vireo.jpg American Redstarts.jpg warbler. On Tuesday, while walking in my building's grarden, I saw blue bird, not a blue jay and not an Eastern bluebird, but a dark blue bird, near an LBJ. I quickly realized that they were a pair of indigo buntings. They are transients in New York City. Whenever they appear in Central Park they attract a flock of binocular bearing humans. Gray catbirds are now common morning visitors to the garden.
On Thursday, I saw a warbling vireo, an American redstart.
More later.

Stay safe,
Arthur
 

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Hello,

Let me finish listing new bird for the season which I saw on Thursday morning. Near Azalea Pond, I saw a magnolia warbler, a hooded warbler, and an ovenbird. At the western end of Turtle Pond, I saw a female Baltimore Oriole; at the eastern end of the pond, I was fortunate to see a yellow warbler.

Stay safe,

Arthur

warbler, magnolia.jpg hooded warbler.jpg ovenbird.jpg oriole, Baltimore.jpg Yellow warbler.jpg
 

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Hello all,

The warbler season is in full swing, which is not to write that I am seeing them. Earlier this week, I saw an eastern kingbird and a Swainson's thrush. New warblers seen included a Canada warbler, and a bay breasted warbler. Today, I did see male and female scarlet tanagers. Today, I picked up the wrong binocular, a ten power instead of the identical looking 8x. Except for the tanager, I would have preferred the lower power.
Today, I admitted to another bird watcher that I was not a good bird watcher but that I was world famous. She laughed then I mentioned this thread.

Stay safe,
Arthur Kingbird.jpg Swainsons thrush.jpg Canada warbler.jpg Bay breasted.jpg Scarlet Tananger.jpg
 

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Sounds like a good week for you Arthur!
Hello KC,

Yes, it was. I was pleased that a northern mockingbird is sill visiting my building's, my block of flats', garden. I should add that today was my first day of no white throated sparrows.

Stay safe,
Arthur
 

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Hello,

First of all, I will relate some observations. Those eastern kingbirds have been building their nest in the same place for years. I missed them during the Pandemic. This is the sort of event which I anticipate, as it marks the seasons. Deep in the shadow above the Gill's source, I saw a male cardinal feeding a dark bird. I thought that it might have been a chick but it may have been courtship. Earlier this week I saw a blue jay eating carrion, which I had never seen before. Yesterday, I did see a white throated sparrow, possibly the last for the year.

I seem to have missed writing of an earlier sighting of a Nashville warbler. I also had sightings of blackpoll warblers, a red eyed vireo, cedar waxwings, an olive sided flycatcher, and a make second year orchard oriole. I had some nice sightings of male Baltimore orioles, once in full sunlight. Finally, I had sightings of chimney swifts

All illustrations are by Louis Agassiz-Fuertes from Eaton's Birds of New York, which had no illustration of the chimney swifts.

Stay safe,
Arthur
. Nashville warbler.jpg Blackpoll.jpg Red eyed vireo.jpg Waxwings, cedar.jpg Orioles, orchard.jpg
 

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Hello,

Deep in the shadow above the Gill's source, I saw a male cardinal feeding a dark bird. I thought that it might have been a chick but it may have been courtship.
Hello,

Someone has suggested that the male northern cardinal had been feeding a brown headed cowbird chick. Cowbirds do lay eggs in the nests of other species, which raise the young, so it may very well have been the case.

Stay safe,
Arthur
 

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Hello all,

There has been a shortage of new bird sightings. I have seen a couple things of interest. I had two sightings of turtles laying eggs and I have been watching the Eastern kingbirds build a nest and which are now incubating a clutch. I can reliably catch red bellied woodpeckers visiting their chicks in a nest hollowed in a tree. The red bellied woodpeckers have managed to keep the starlings from chasing them out.

My last two warblers were a female American redstart and a female blackpoll, weeks ago. However, I finally crossed paths with a barred owl, which has been around the Boathouse Cafe for many weeks. Two weeks, ago, I spotted one of those little flycatchers which I can never sort out. It may have been a willow, or an alder but I will guess from my brief sighting that it was a least flycatcher. For a few days there were a pair of male wood ducks at Turtle Pond, perhaps the most spectacular of Central Park's waterfowl.

My garden offers little more than gray catbirds, American robins, mourning doves and the norther cardinal.

I expect very little change for six weeks.

Stay safe,
Arthur
barred owl.jpg Least flycatcher.jpg Wood duck.jpg
 

KC Foggin

Super Moderator
Staff member
Opus Editor
Supporter
United States
Good for you spotting an Owl I have never laid eyes on Arthur. I do miss my occasional visits to Central Park when I lived in NYC. I have seen often the male and female Wood Duck though ;)
 

rdcny

Well-known member
Hi Arthur - this past Sunday (3 July 2021), we had some migrants on the Bob Bird Walk in Central Park: at least two (seen together) Worm-eating Warblers and a Swamp Sparrow. The latter is an early record southbound migration date for the species (SwSp). Worm-eating Warblers are notorious early July migrants IF we have just a hint of overnight winds from the northwest...early record date is 1 July for that species. We had a possible third Worm-eating Warbler later in the walk at a nearby location...but we are happy to be conservative in our count. See You soon - and Thank You again - Bob
 

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